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Hans Berliner
H Berliner 
 
Number of games in database: 136
Years covered: 1945 to 2001

Overall record: +59 -36 =39 (58.6%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 2 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian (15) 
    E94 E86 E81 E77 E99
 Nimzo Indian (12) 
    E30 E25 E31 E27 E24
 Queen's Gambit Declined (10) 
    D35 D31 D06
 Grunfeld (9) 
    D86 D85 D87
 French Defense (4) 
    C11 C14 C10
With the Black pieces:
 King's Indian (18) 
    E67 E60 E97 E80 E81
 Alekhine's Defense (11) 
    B03 B04 B05 B02
 Queen's Gambit Accepted (7) 
    D29 D27 D25 D23
 Queen's Pawn Game (4) 
    A45 D02 A46 D04
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Estrin vs H Berliner, 1965 0-1
   H Berliner vs A Rott, 1956 1-0
   H Berliner vs S E Almgren, 1946 1-0
   R H Steinmeyer vs H Berliner, 1959 0-1
   H Berliner vs Bisguier, 1960 1-0
   H Berliner vs G Sanakoev, 2001 1/2-1/2
   H Berliner vs G Borisenko, 1965 1-0
   H Berliner vs Fischer, 1957 1/2-1/2
   L Gilden vs H Berliner, 1959 0-1
   H Berliner vs H Seidman, 1957 1/2-1/2

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   US Championship 1957/58 (1957)
   60th US Open (1959)
   US Championship (1962)
   58th US Open (1957)
   54th US Open (1953)
   56th US Open (1955)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   5th Correspondence World Championship Final by crawfb5
   US Championship 1957/58 by suenteus po 147
   US Championship 1957/58 by shankartr2018
   Yankton 1946 by Phony Benoni

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Hans Berliner
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HANS BERLINER
(born Jan-27-1929, died Jan-13-2017, 87 years old) Germany (federation/nationality United States of America)

[what is this?]

IM and GMC (1968) Hans Jack Berliner was born in Berlin.

Berliner entered public school just as Hitler was rising to power. In 1937, his family immigrated to the Washington, D.C. area to escape Nazi persecution. A nephew of his uncle Emile Berliner, Joseph Sanders, arranged for several members of the extended Berliner family to immigrate to America. (1)

He learned chess at age thirteen and went on to play in several U.S. Championships and earn a spot on his country's Olympiad team in 1952. However, he is famous primarily for his feats in correspondence play, most notably his victory in the 5th World Correspondence Championship with the record score of 14/16, making him the ICCF World Champion from 1965-68.

His controversial book The System describes his rigorous and scientific approach to chess analysis. In his later years, he worked to help develop chess computers such as Hitech (Computer). He died in Riviera Beach, Florida on January 13, 2017.

(1) Biography by Bill Wall http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/a...
(2) Wikipedia article: Hans Berliner

Last updated: 2017-01-23 12:29:57

 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 141  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Koltanowski vs H Berliner  1-0391945SimulD04 Queen's Pawn Game
2. H Berliner vs Larry Friedman 0-1291946US Junior ChC57 Two Knights
3. H Berliner vs S E Almgren 1-035194647th US OpenC11 French
4. M Aleman Dovo vs H Berliner  1-021194647th US OpenC11 French
5. G Kramer vs H Berliner  ½-½44194647th US OpenD23 Queen's Gambit Accepted
6. R Byrne vs H Berliner 1-053194647th US OpenC34 King's Gambit Accepted
7. L E Marquez vs H Berliner  1-0301946Yankton International TournamentD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
8. W M Byland vs H Berliner  ½-½271946Yankton International TournamentB01 Scandinavian
9. H Berliner vs R Cintron  1-0481946Yankton International TournamentC10 French
10. H Berliner vs A Margolis  0-1461946Yankton International TournamentC14 French, Classical
11. A Powers vs H Berliner  0-1431946Yankton International TournamentD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
12. H Berliner vs F Planas Garcia  ½-½321946Yankton International TournamentC11 French
13. H Berliner vs M Colon Romero  1-0231946Yankton International TournamentB70 Sicilian, Dragon Variation
14. H Berliner vs A Mengarini 1-0261949RochesterC36 King's Gambit Accepted, Abbazia Defense
15. H Berliner vs G Kramer  1-058195051st US OpenB04 Alekhine's Defense, Modern
16. Santasiere vs H Berliner  1-041195051st US OpenE67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
17. F Zita vs H Berliner  ½-½291952Helsinki Olympiad Final-AA04 Reti Opening
18. H Fajans vs H Berliner  0-144195354th US OpenB33 Sicilian
19. M Pavey vs H Berliner  ½-½41195354th US OpenD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
20. Dake vs H Berliner  ½-½21195354th US OpenE42 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 c5, 5.Ne2 (Rubinstein)
21. H Berliner vs C Henin  1-036195354th US OpenE99 King's Indian, Orthodox, Taimanov
22. H Steiner vs H Berliner  ½-½30195354th US OpenD29 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
23. H Berliner vs C Brasket  0-137195354th US OpenD85 Grunfeld
24. I A Horowitz vs H Berliner  1-044195354th US OpenD29 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
25. H Berliner vs K Burger  0-134195354th US OpenD85 Grunfeld
 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 141  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Berliner wins | Berliner loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: My impression from the review I read is that the book made outlandish claims about "The System." It could well be a good system, but to claim it was winning, or at least led to a solid advantage, is just not possible in 200 pages. Berliner apparently simply omitted all kinds of good defenses for black.

<The fact that Black has a very bad position after <1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5> and after <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5> certainly does not [instill] much faith in Black’s ability to find a satisfactory defensive set-up.”>

Now I would say that's a pretty controversial claim. He's saying black should not allow the Queen Gambit's Exchange variation? The opportunity comes up at the highest levels every day, and white usually does not play cxd5. He's saying the Grunfeld "does not instill faith"? The world's best players play the Grunfeld.

Jan-27-23  stone free or die: Well <saff>, I like writing that helps the reader along. My main point is that the "controversial" statement is a bit cryptic - especially more so as the bio has aged.

Reversing the clauses shows the contradiction more clearly:

<Berliner's rigorous and scientific approach to chess analysis is described in his controversial book <The System> >

A rigorous and scientific approach is controversial?!? Maybe on Rogoff -ha! But here if leaves one wondering why.

Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <A rigorous and scientific approach is controversial?!?>

A rigorous and scientific white repertoire in less than 200 pages?

A. Players have ignored it since it was published.

B. It doesn't do what it claims to.

Jan-27-23  stone free or die: <saff> I can only conclude you're a published author, which is the only explanation I can come up with for this pagecount obsession!

Just curious, how many pages do you think would be required?

As for (A), that does make a book controversial. If anything, it might suggest it just the opposite.

As for (B), you've just targeted about 90% of the contemporary published chess literature, haven't you?

.

Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <Just curious, how many pages do you think would be required?>

To present a winning plan for white (or at least gaining a solid advantage) from move one?

Thousands of pages.

Elite chess players are result-oriented, do we agree? If Berliner had actually presented as good an opening system for white as he claimed to, everyone would be playing it today.

But believe me, whoever reviewed it for "Inside Chess"--it must have been Benjamin or Donaldson--really, really hated it.

As I remember, repeating myself, the primary complaint was that the book was not nearly detailed enough, did not have deep enough varations, to justify Berliner's claims.

Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: Wow a bunch of kibitzes have been made today for Berliner on his birthday! He’s definitely 1 of the best correspondence chess players of all time & he got into corr chess before chess players were using computers for analysis. <fredthebear> I agree that Stockfish thinking that the Colle System is better than the Queen’s Gambit is controversial. I’ve noticed that when black plays ...g6 & fianchettos his ♔side ♗ vs the Colle, he/she normally doesn’t hv any problems fending off attacks from white. That is unless there’s a big rating difference & white has a substantially higher rating than black does OR black just plays a blunder. I plan to do some analyzing w/ Stockfish w/ both openings & c what happens!
Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <How about the Woodpecker Method, anyone?>

I tried it (one cycle, at least), and I still suck. But even a very good book can only do so much. I still think the method is worth trying. The problem, if you do something other than play chess for a living, is finding the time.

Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: The Woodpecker method is basically like using Reinfeld's two books: 1001 Brilliant Checkmates and 1001 Winning Chess Sacrifices and Combinations.

I remember Joseph Sparks mentioning that reading and re-reading those Reinfeld books can help a player improve at tactics and mates.

Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: To elaborate more on ...g6, when black plays this vs the Colle, white’s ♗ on d3 is “biting on granite”
Jan-27-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: This game is always worth looking at again:

Estrin vs H Berliner, 1965

Jan-28-23  whiteshark: The German GM Robert Huebner reviewed Berliner's work in detail in ChessBase magazine (No. 79 [2000] and No. 80 [2001]) and came to the conclusion

<"that <The System> is a system of faith. [...] The mind cannot gain a foothold on what is commanded, but it is not supposed to; allegiance and faith provide security.">

Jan-29-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: I broke down and bought a digital clpy of "The System." Looks like a smart purchase so far.

From the introduction:

<There seems to be some point where one side is far enough ahead to force his opponent to make concessions as discussed above. We believe that point also exists at the start of the game. The fact that Black has a very bad position after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5 and after 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 certainly does not instil much faith in Black’s ability to find a satisfactory defensive set-up. We have not as yet found any refutation of the Nimzo-Indian Defence, but are close. However, if the analyses of the Queen’s Gambit Declined and the Grünfeld Defence are correct, then the future will certainly bring further refutations, and chess will be a solved game by the year 2030. Many will wring their hands at this, and hope that I am wrong.>

So the Queens Gambit and the Grunfeld are discarded without a word of analysis. And only eight years until chess will be solved! (Tablebases reach seven pieces as I understand, so a long way to go before '30.)

Jan-29-23  Sally Simpson: Hi Saffuna,

(the book is so good you posted twice.)

Computers via tablebases are solving chess backwards. There maybe a huge leap in technology ( they will call it 'The God Chip') and come 2030 a 32 piece tablebase will be on everyone's mobile phone.

I suspect the best first move will be 1.Nf3 (commands central squares, does not weaken the pawn structure.) 1..Nf6 is the reply.

Jan-29-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <(the book is so good you posted twice.)>

I re-posted with a typo corrected. Then at the moment I had posted and went back to delete the original post, the hour had passed and I could no longer delete it!

Jan-31-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <The fact that Black has a very bad position after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5 and after 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 certainly does not instil much faith in Black’s ability to find a satisfactory defensive set-up. We have not as yet found any refutation of the Nimzo-Indian Defence, but are close.>

I'm very much in the market for a refutation of the Nimzoindian, given that I seem to be struggling for equality against it at times. So let me know when that gets figured out, <jim>.

Speaking seriously, I do think the terrible Black score for the QGD is meaningful. Not that super-GMs, who are generally satisfied to survive with Black, need to choose their defenses that way, but I know that, for example, FSR avoids really low-scoring lines.

Jan-31-23  savagerules: This Berliner guy is the 1 d4 and Wins equivalent of the 1 e4 and Wins mantra by the controversial Weaver Adams back in the day. Fischer referred to Adams on occasion and of course he was also a proponent of 1 e4.

I think Berliner wanted chess to be solved by 2030 and he would be 100 years old by then and could then die happy seeing his 1 d4 proven right. But Berliner died and 1 d4 is just another opening move, nothing special.

Jan-31-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: If one looks at the percentages in the Opening Explorer, 1. Na3 is awesome (66.7% wins), albeit on a small sample (30 games).

Of the first moves with thousands of samples, most score around 38% wins, the highest being 1. b3 (38.5%).

Feb-01-23  stone free or die: <beat> Ha!

But as I've often said, every number number is a lie without an error bar.

One also has to be very suspect of sampling bias for this screwball opening.

And what's <CG> criteria for game selection? (Are we filtering on min ELO, average ELO, recent tournament play, etc. etc.)

<Millbase> gives 1.Na3 a 55% scoring (21 games), dropping down to the expected 42% if Black answers with 1...e5 (6 games).

(Note- if White answers 1...e5 with 2.Nh3 the scoring goes to 100% (2 games).)

Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <keypusher: <The fact that Black has a very bad position after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5 and after 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 certainly does not instil much faith in Black’s ability to find a satisfactory defensive set-up. We have not as yet found any refutation of the Nimzo-Indian Defence, but are close.>

I'm very much in the market for a refutation of the Nimzoindian, given that I seem to be struggling for equality against it at times. So let me know when that gets figured out, <jim>.>

Berliner was a crackpot, right up there with Weaver <White to Play and Win> Adams. (Weaver in action: W Adams vs G Kramer, 1946) But you knew that. The Nimzo-Indian is Black's best defense to 1.d4, scores 49% for Black, and will never be refuted. btw, I heard Peter Svidler recently say that all mainstream openings will turn out to be drawn with best play, with the possible exception of the King's Indian, which might just lose for Black.

<Speaking seriously, I do think the terrible Black score for the QGD is meaningful. Not that super-GMs, who are generally satisfied to survive with Black, need to choose their defenses that way, but I know that, for example, FSR avoids really low-scoring lines.>

Yes, I pay a lot of attention both to how different openings score and what the engines think of them. You won't see me playing lines for Black that score 40%.

Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  nizmo11: <Sally Simpson> <I suspect the best first move will be 1.Nf3 (commands central squares, does not weaken the pawn structure.) 1..Nf6 is the reply.>
After 1.Nf3 Nf6 the perfect game continues 2.Nc3 Nc6, and then the main moves are 3.Ng1! and 3.Nb1!
Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <After 1.Nf3 Nf6 the perfect game continues 2.Nc3 Nc6, and then the main moves are 3.Ng1! and 3.Nb1!>

Correct. Advancing pawns only weakens white's defensive position.

Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <beatgiant> Opening Explorer shows that the six most popular opening moves are 1.e4, 1.d4, 1.Nf3, 1.c4, 1.f4, and 1.b3. 1.f4 is an outlier (=weak), with White scoring only 34.4% and Black scoring a walloping 41.7%. We'll put it aside.

The rest all have White wins of between 37.2% (for 1.Nf3) and 38.5% (1.b3, as you note). Black's winning percentage for these openings varies more widely, from 24.7% (1.Nf3) to 33.4% (1.b3). So 1.b3 is both the winningest and losingest opening move of those five, making it overall the worst-scoring move of them. I am surprised to see that 1.c4 is White's best-scoring move in the database, with a 12.7% gap between wins and losses, while 1.Nf3 (No. 2) is 12.5%.

1.e4 has only a 7.8% difference. This is due primarily to the mighty Sicilian, Black's most popular response. Opening Explorer shows that 1...g6 scores even better, but I suspect that in the case of that opening the Black players are higher rated than the Whites.

Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <FSR> <beatgiant> Mildly surprising to me that 1.g3 is nearly as popular as 1.b3 and 1.f4 put together (and scores better than either). Does it even have a name? I guess some people call it the Hungarian Opening.

I guess 1.g3 (which I've done pretty well with online) generally transposes to something else, while 1.b3 and 1.f4 have more of an identity.

Feb-01-23
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <keypusher> 1.g3 is also called Benko's Opening. It's a little offbeat, but I think it's as good as the "Big Four."
Feb-02-23  sudoplatov: Just for fun, we once ran LACHEX for several hours from the beginning position; the Book was turned off. LACHEX found 4 opening moves worthy of consideration: d4 and e4 followed closely by c4 and Nf3. I'm guessing that transpositions were collapsed into "normal" lines. It did tell us that the evaluation function was reasonable.

We also tried 1d4 Nf6, c4 e6, 3.Bb4 a3 and LACHEX preferred Bxc3. Also, after 1.e4 e5, 2.Nf3 Nc6, 3.Bb3 a6, the computer preferred Ba4 a bit over Bxc6 (its only choices.)

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