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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Russian Championship Superfinal (Women) Tournament

Olga Girya8/11(+6 -1 =4)[games]
Natalija Pogonina8/11(+6 -1 =4)[games]
Aleksandra Goryachkina7.5/11(+4 -0 =7)[games]
Valentina Gunina7/11(+6 -3 =2)[games]
Margarita Potapova6/11(+3 -2 =6)[games]
Alina Kashlinskaya6/11(+4 -3 =4)[games]
Alexandra Kosteniuk5.5/11(+5 -5 =1)[games]
Daria Charochkina5/11(+4 -5 =2)[games]
Anastasia Bodnaruk4/11(+1 -4 =6)[games]
Polina Shuvalova4/11(+2 -5 =4)[games]
Elena Tomilova3/11(+1 -6 =4)[games]
Zarina Shafigullina2/11(+1 -8 =2)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Russian Championship Superfinal (Women) (2019)

The 69th Russian Women's Championship Superfinal took place in the cities of Votkinsk (rounds 1-2) and Izhevsk (rounds 3-11), Russia from 10-22 August 2019. Rest days: August 12 and 18. Organizers: the Russian Chess Federation, the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation and the Government of the Udmurt Republic. Sponsors: Renault Russia, the Federal Grid Company of the Unified Energy System (Rosseti Group), PhosAgro and others. Tournament director: Alexander Tkachev. The event was a 12-player round-robin, where the winner would receive 600,000 roubles (~$9,000) and a Renault Arkana car. The top three finishers would qualify for next year's Superfinal. The time control was 90 minutes for 40 moves, then 30 minutes to the end of the game, with a 30-second increment from move one. No draw offers allowed before move 40. A tie for first place would be split by two 15+10 Rapid games and, if the score still tied, a 5 vs. 4 Armageddon game. Games started at 3 pm, except round 11 which started at 1 pm local time.

Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 =1 Girya 2462 * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 8 =1 Pogonina 2457 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 8 3 Goryachkina 2564 1 ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 7½ 4 Gunina 2497 0 0 ½ * 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 7 5 Potapova 2335 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 6 6 Kashlinskaya 2491 ½ ½ 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 6 7 Kosteniuk 2507 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 * 1 1 0 1 1 5½ 8 Charochkina 2352 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 * ½ 1 1 1 5 9 Bodnaruk 2429 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 4 10 Shuvalova 2419 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ * ½ 1 4 11 Tomilova 2376 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ * 0 3 12 Shafigullina 2332 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1 * 2

Category: VIII (2435). Chief arbiter: Elena Polovina

Girya and Pogonina had to determine the championship on tiebreak. Girya won the first Rapid game, but Pogonina won the second. They then played an Armageddon game, which was won by Girya, who had the white pieces (see Russian Championship Superfinal (Women) Tiebreaks (2019)). So Olga Girya became the Russian women's champion for the first time in her career.

Official site: http://ruchess.ru/en/news/all/evgen...
Chess24: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...
Chess-Results: http://chess-results.com/tnr461965....
ChessBase 1: https://en.chessbase.com/post/russi...
ChessBase 2: https://en.chessbase.com/post/russi...
TWIC: https://theweekinchess.com/chessnew...

Previous: Russian Championship Superfinal (Women) (2018). Next: Russian Championship Superfinal (Women) (2020). Open section: Russian Championship Superfinal (2019)

 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 66  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. D Charochkina vs Margarita Potapova  1-0312019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)A45 Queen's Pawn Game
2. O Girya vs A Kashlinskaya  ½-½672019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
3. V Gunina vs Zarina Shafigullina  1-0792019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D20 Queen's Gambit Accepted
4. N Pogonina vs E Tomilova 1-0692019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)E09 Catalan, Closed
5. P Shuvalova vs A Bodnaruk  ½-½412019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)B51 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
6. Kosteniuk vs Goryachkina  ½-½852019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D78 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O c6
7. A Kashlinskaya vs Zarina Shafigullina  ½-½412019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D25 Queen's Gambit Accepted
8. E Tomilova vs V Gunina  1-0392019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D02 Queen's Pawn Game
9. Goryachkina vs N Pogonina  ½-½402019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D20 Queen's Gambit Accepted
10. A Bodnaruk vs Kosteniuk  0-1652019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)C77 Ruy Lopez
11. Margarita Potapova vs P Shuvalova  ½-½752019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
12. O Girya vs D Charochkina  1-0402019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)B07 Pirc
13. D Charochkina vs A Kashlinskaya  0-1502019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)A21 English
14. Zarina Shafigullina vs E Tomilova  1-0362019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)A01 Nimzovich-Larsen Attack
15. V Gunina vs Goryachkina  ½-½402019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
16. N Pogonina vs A Bodnaruk  1-0562019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)A48 King's Indian
17. Kosteniuk vs Margarita Potapova  0-1412019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)B95 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6...e6
18. P Shuvalova vs O Girya  0-1282019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)B13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
19. Goryachkina vs Zarina Shafigullina  1-0592019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)C42 Petrov Defense
20. A Kashlinskaya vs E Tomilova  1-0492019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D44 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
21. D Charochkina vs P Shuvalova  1-0602019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)A03 Bird's Opening
22. O Girya vs Kosteniuk  1-0392019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)E32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
23. Margarita Potapova vs N Pogonina  ½-½372019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)D37 Queen's Gambit Declined
24. A Bodnaruk vs V Gunina  ½-½682019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)C67 Ruy Lopez
25. P Shuvalova vs A Kashlinskaya  ½-½352019Russian Championship Superfinal (Women)C43 Petrov, Modern Attack
 page 1 of 3; games 1-25 of 66  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-22-19  paavoh: Pogonina seems to have prevailed with 8/11 and a better S-B over Girya.
Aug-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fabelhaft: Girya won after playoff:

<A tie for first place is split by two 15+10 rapid games and, if the score is still tied, a 5 vs. 4 Armageddon game>

Aug-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: Another example of the silliness of determining the winner of a tournament at classic time control based on the winner of (only) two games played at rapid time controls where the winner of the rapid time control games can very likely be due entirely to chance. Then add to that silliness an Armageddon game at even faster time controls, with different rules than used in the tournament for which we are trying to determine a winner, and when there is no statistical evidence whether the time control/draw odds don't favor one player over the other.

In contrast the player with the higher Sonneborn-Berger score is the player who performed the best against the other players in the very same tournament for which we are trying to break a tie. Add to that that no additional effort or cost is required on anyone's part.

Doesn't that seem foolish to you? It certainly does to me.

Aug-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fabelhaft: <In contrast the player with the higher Sonneborn-Berger score is the player who performed the best against the other players>

I’m not too certain about that, if Pogonina really performed better than Girya she should have scored more points than her.

Aug-28-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<fabelhaft> I’m not too certain about that, if Pogonina really performed better than Girya she should have scored more points than her.

The Sonneborn-Berger score is calculated by adding the sum of the scores of the players they defeated to half the sum of the scores of those they drew against. If Pogonina (or anyone else) had a higher Sonneborn-Berger score then her <opponents> performed better than Girya's <opponents> in the tournament. So the player whose opponents performed better in this tournament will get the higher Sonneborn-Berger score, since that player's opponents played better than any other players that tied for the same place. See, for example, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonne....

This could cause an oddity that some may object to. If Girya had defeated Pogonina (or vice versa) and finished the tournament with the same score, then Pogonina of necessity would have scored better than Girya against her opponents. This is the reverse of some tiebreakers who break the tie by first comparing the two player's head-to-head score. But it makes more sense to me for the tiebreaker to consider the results of a many games as possible rather then having it decided based on the result of a single game.

And to me, even this is more reasonable than deciding the winner of the tournament by playing rapid, blitz, or Armageddon games at time controls different than the time control used in the tournament for which the tiebreak is being applied.

Sep-08-19  roentgenium: I'm afraid I must respectfully disagree with you here, <AylerKupp>. Whilst I personally have no problem with using the Sonneborn-Berger score as a tiebreaker method, I feel your arguments carry their weight in a Swiss-style tournament, as opposed to a round-robin tournament such as this one.

By definition as a round-robin tournament, each of the 12 players in the Russian Women's Superfinal played each other once. Girya and Pogonina both finished with 8/11. Suppose for the sake of argument that Girya has the higher Sonneborn-Berger score than Pogonina. I argue that this is no clear indication that Girya 'performed better' than Pogonina in the tournament.

Why? Because whilst you may argue (in this hypothetical case) that Girya did better than Pogonina in their games against people who performed better, this would also imply that Girya did worse than Pogonina in their games against people who performed worse!

What follows is merely my opinion, but I don't really see why beating those who did better and then losing to those who did worse is any better than the reverse. If we were to compute a performance rating for both Pogonina and Girya for this tournament, excluding the game where they directly played against each other, it should work out to be the same performance rating. To me, the 'zero-sum' nature of the opponents in a round-robin format is a reason why the Sonneborn-Berger method is not the best suited for tiebreaking.

It's different in a Swiss, as your opponents tend to only represent a portion of the playing pool, and therefore the strength of opponents can vary considerably. Hence why tiebreak methods such as Buchholz, Median-Buchholz, Sonneborn-Berger and Cumulative Score are widely employed.

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