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Tigran V Petrosian
Petrosian 
 
Number of games in database: 2,054
Years covered: 1942 to 1983
Highest rating achieved in database: 2660

Overall record: +746 -167 =1120 (64.2%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 21 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian (128) 
    E92 E81 E80 E60 E91
 English (84) 
    A15 A14 A16 A13 A17
 Queen's Indian (84) 
    E12 E14 E19 E17 E15
 Nimzo Indian (83) 
    E40 E41 E46 E55 E53
 Queen's Gambit Declined (72) 
    D37 D35 D30 D38 D31
 Queen's Pawn Game (62) 
    A46 A40 D02 E10 D05
With the Black pieces:
 French Defense (145) 
    C07 C16 C11 C18 C15
 Sicilian (141) 
    B94 B52 B81 B84 B40
 Caro-Kann (84) 
    B18 B17 B11 B14 B12
 King's Indian (84) 
    E67 E63 E81 E91 E60
 Nimzo Indian (60) 
    E54 E32 E58 E56 E46
 French Tarrasch (54) 
    C07 C05 C03 C09
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Petrosian vs Spassky, 1966 1-0
   Petrosian vs Pachman, 1961 1-0
   Spassky vs Petrosian, 1966 0-1
   Petrosian vs Botvinnik, 1963 1-0
   Fischer vs Petrosian, 1959 1/2-1/2
   Petrosian vs Fischer, 1971 1-0
   Kasparov vs Petrosian, 1981 0-1
   Petrosian vs Smyslov, 1961 1-0
   Reshevsky vs Petrosian, 1953 1/2-1/2
   Keres vs Petrosian, 1959 0-1

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: [what is this?]
   Botvinnik - Petrosian World Championship Match (1963)
   Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1966)
   Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1969)

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Armenian Championship (1946)
   USSR Championship 1961a (1961)
   Curacao Candidates (1962)
   Tbilisi URS-ch sf (1956)
   USSR Championship (1959)
   Buenos Aires (1964)
   Nimzowitsch Memorial (1960)
   Keres Memorial (1979)
   USSR Championship (1951)
   USSR Championship (1969)
   Bled (1961)
   Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959)
   USSR Championship (1960)
   Stockholm Interzonal (1962)
   Zagreb (1965)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Petrosian Games Only by fredthebear
   Match Petrosian! by amadeus
   Match Petrosian! by docjan
   Python Strategy (Petrosian) by losi
   Python Strategy (Petrosian) by knightstorm
   Python Strategy (Petrosian) by Qindarka
   Tigran Petrosian's Best Games by Okavango
   Tigran Petrosian's Best Games by Okavango
   Biggest Heritor of Nimzo by Gottschalk
   Tigran Petrosian's Best Games by KingG
   Veliki majstori saha 27 PETROSJAN (Marovic) by Chessdreamer
   Tigran, Tigran, burning bright by sleepyirv
   Power Chess - Petrosian by Anatoly21
   Road to the Championship - Tigran Petrosian by paulo.campelor


Search Sacrifice Explorer for Tigran V Petrosian
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TIGRAN V PETROSIAN
(born Jun-17-1929, died Aug-13-1984, 55 years old) Georgia (federation/nationality Armenia)
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]

Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian was the World Champion from 1963 until 1969. He was born in Tiflis (modern day Tbilisi) in Georgia to Armenian parents, but eventually relocated to Armenia in 1946 before moving to Moscow in 1949.

Petrosian was an avid student of Aron Nimzowitsch 's theories. His play was renowned for its virtually impenetrable defence and patient manoeuvring, a technique that earned him the nickname “Iron Tigran”. Despite this, his capacity for dealing with tactical complications when the need arose prompted Boris Spassky to comment that: ”It is to Petrosian's advantage that his opponents never know when he is suddenly going to play like Mikhail Tal ”, and Robert James Fischer to observe that "He has an incredible tactical view, and a wonderful sense of the danger... No matter how much you think deep... He will 'smell' any kind of danger 20 moves before!" Petrosian’s pioneering use of the positional exchange sacrifice underscored both his positional and tactical grasp of the game. Moreover, he has two major opening systems named after him: the Petrosian Variation of the King's Indian Defence (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Be2 e5 7.d5) and the Petrosian System in the Queen's Indian Defence (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.a3).

National Championships: Petrosian's first major win was the championship of Georgia in 1945 when he was 16. He won the 5th USSR Junior Championship in 1946 with a score of 14/15, won or came equal first in the championships of Armenia held in 1946, 1948, 1974, 1976 and 1980, won the Moscow championship in 1951; and shared first place with Vladimir Simagin and David Bronstein in the 1956 and 1968 Moscow Championships respectively. He gained his International Master title in the 1951 Soviet Championships, and went on to win the Soviet championship outright three times in 1959, 1961, and 1975, sharing the title with Lev Polugaevsky in 1969.

World championships: Petrosian won his Grandmaster title when he came equal second in the 1952 Interzonal tournament in Stockholm, which also qualified him for the 1953 Candidates tournament in Zurich. An eight time Candidate for the World Championship in 1953, 1956, 1959, 1962, 1971, 1974, 1977 and 1980, he won the Curacao Candidates Tournament of 1962 without losing a single game. The following year, he won the Petrosian - Botvinnik World Championship Match (1963) to become the 9th official World Chess Champion. He retained his title by winning the Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1966), the first time since the Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934) that the World Champion had succeeded in winning a title match. This feat was not repeated until Anatoly Karpov ’s success at the Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Match (1978). He also advanced to the Fischer - Petrosian Candidates Final (1971) semifinals, but lost, thereby losing the opportunity to qualify to the 1972 championship.

Team Play: Petrosian played in ten consecutive Soviet Olympiad teams from 1958 to 1978, winning nine team gold medals, one team silver medal, and six individual gold medals. His overall performance in Olympiad play was +78 =50 −1, the only loss being to Robert Huebner. He also played for the Soviet team in every European Team Championship from 1957 to 1983, winning eight team gold medals, and four board gold medals.

Classical Tournaments: Soon after becoming champion, he shared first place with Paul Keres in the first Piatagorsky Cup in Los Angeles in 1963. He won the tournaments at Biel and Lone Pine in 1976, the Keres Memorial in 1979, and took second place in Tilburg in 1981, half a point behind the winner Alexander Beliavsky. He was ranked among the top 20 players in the world until he died in 1984.

"Chess is a game by its form, an art by its content and a science by the difficulty of gaining mastery in it. Chess can convey as much happiness as a good book or work of music can. However, it is necessary to learn to play well and only afterwards will one experience real delight." - Tigran Petrosian

References: (1) http://www.ac-iccd.org/ (Petrosian often required a hearing aid during his tournaments), (2) Wikipedia article: Tigran Petrosian


 page 1 of 83; games 1-25 of 2,054  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Petrosian vs Kopelevic 1-0241942TbilisiC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
2. Petrosian vs Flohr 1-0451942SimulA52 Budapest Gambit
3. G Gamrekeli vs Petrosian 0-1351944Georgian ChampionshipB12 Caro-Kann Defense
4. Agamalian vs Petrosian  0-1561944Georgian ChampionshipA45 Queen's Pawn Game
5. Petrosian vs V Mikenas 0-1411944Georgian ChampionshipB05 Alekhine's Defense, Modern
6. Petrosian vs A Blagidze  0-1401944Georgian ChampionshipE64 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Yugoslav System
7. Petrosian vs N Sorokin 1-0231944Georgian ChampionshipD33 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
8. Petrosian vs V Tsintsadze 0-1221944Georgian ChampionshipB83 Sicilian
9. Mirzayev vs Petrosian  0-1601944Georgian ChampionshipB50 Sicilian
10. Petrosian vs Nersesov 1-0161944Georgian ChampionshipC42 Petrov Defense
11. V Sereda vs Petrosian  ½-½431944Georgian ChampionshipD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
12. V Malashkhia vs Petrosian 1-0191944Georgian ChampionshipB74 Sicilian, Dragon, Classical
13. Petrosian vs Kasparian  0-1501944Georgian ChampionshipE61 King's Indian
14. G Bakhtadze vs Petrosian 0-1271944Georgian ChampionshipA28 English
15. Petrosian vs A Smorodsky ½-½401944Georgian ChampionshipA28 English
16. Lolua vs Petrosian ½-½361945TbilisiC34 King's Gambit Accepted
17. Petrosian vs V Korolkov 1-0181945LeningradE10 Queen's Pawn Game
18. Petrosian vs Zeinalli 1-0201945LeningradA33 English, Symmetrical
19. Petrosian vs A Ebralidze 1-0481945Tbilisi ChampionshipA28 English
20. Petrosian vs M Shishov ½-½511945Tbilisi-chE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
21. Grigoriev vs Petrosian 0-1261945TbilisiB00 Uncommon King's Pawn Opening
22. Petrosian vs Y Rudakov 1-0321945LeningradD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
23. V Sereda vs Petrosian 0-1571945Georgian ChampionshipA49 King's Indian, Fianchetto without c4
24. Petrosian vs Chachua 1-0361945Training TournamentD05 Queen's Pawn Game
25. Petrosian vs Kelendzheridze 1-0191945Training TournamentC17 French, Winawer, Advance
 page 1 of 83; games 1-25 of 2,054  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Petrosian wins | Petrosian loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 91 OF 91 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-04-22  syracrophy: It's remarkable that The Tiger with his solid and prophylactic style has some of the most entertaining games were the King walks around the heat of the battle and survives.
May-04-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: I was fortunate to have the pleasure of playing in a simul against Tigran. I see that he was in the United States in 1978, but believe the simul I played in took place in the early 80's in Boston. Any one know the details better? thanks in advance Bruce
May-04-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Joshka how did you get on ?
Did you record the gamescore by any chance ?
May-04-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Petrosian gave a simul at the Boylston Chess Club in late February-early March of 1982.
May-04-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: <Joshka>

I too would be interested in seeing the gamescore if you still have it. I have great respect for Petrosian as a player and would like to see how you fared.

May-09-22  Ulhumbrus: Fischer indicated during the early 1960s that Petrosian was the strongest player in the world then.

Korchnoi said that most players- including perhaps most Soviet players - regarded Petrosian's style with contempt but Fischer alone amongst them evaluated Petrosian's style more accurately.

Fischer said that he liked Petrosian's play more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik.

This suggests that Fischer considered Petrosian's play to be more accurate or sounder than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik.

Perhaps Fischer considered Petrosian's play to be more in accordance with what Fischer evaluated the true state of balance of the position to be than the play of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik. Possibly in comparison with Petrosian's play Fischer considered Tal's play to be less sound at times, Spassky's play to be too optimistic at times and Botvinnik's play to lack sufficient foresight at times.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: <Ulhumbrus: Fischer indicated during the early 1960s that Petrosian was the strongest player in the world then... Fischer said that he liked Petrosian's play more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik.>

That's interesting, especially the second one. Not that I don't believe you but what are the sources for these?

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: difficult to rank players from different eras. Carlsen has played a LOT of chess, played in more tournaments than Fischer or Spassky, absolutely more than Capablanca. The more you play, the more often you'll have a bad day and get a chess lesson. Especially when you factor in internet G30 tournaments.
May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: <HMM>

That is certainly one of the key reasons why it's impractical to compare players of different eras. I like what Michael Jordan (a man who knew greatness probably as much as anyone ever has) had to say about greatness in basketball: <I believe greatness is an evolutionary process that changes and evolves era to era.> This of course can apply to most anything, including chess.

May-11-22  Ulhumbrus: < 0ZeR0: <Ulhumbrus: Fischer indicated during the early 1960s that Petrosian was the strongest player in the world then... Fischer said that he liked Petrosian's play more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik.>

That's interesting, especially the second one. Not that I don't believe you but what are the sources for these?>

Korchnoi's remarks about Petrosian come from the earlier version of his book <Chess is my life> Batsford first paperback edition 1978, chapter 8, page 46, penultimate paragraph <...For years, chess masters regarded his inimitable style with contempt and fear...>

Kasparov in his book <My great predecessors part III>, the book on Petrosian and Spassky, page 54, col 1 quotes Kotov saying that Fischer said <If Petrosian played more boldly, he would be the strongest player in the world>

I suggest that Petrosian was indeed the strongest player in the world in the early 1960s from 1960 to 1963 and that Petrosian was at his peak during this period.

I don't remember where I read that Fischer said that he liked the play of Petrosian more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik although he may have said it to Hort or to Gligorich.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <0Zer0>, that is a most insightful quote from Jordan and one I had never seen.

A bit of irony: the one time I saw Jordan play live, he made little impression (17 during a season in which his average was twice that), but teammate Horace Grant came through with a big game as Bulls crushed Knicks anyway.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: <Ulhumbrus: < 0ZeR0: <Ulhumbrus: Fischer indicated during the early 1960s that Petrosian was the strongest player in the world then... Fischer said that he liked Petrosian's play more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik.>

That's interesting, especially the second one. Not that I don't believe you but what are the sources for these?>

Korchnoi's remarks about Petrosian come from the earlier version of his book <Chess is my life> Batsford first paperback edition 1978, chapter 8, page 46, penultimate paragraph <...For years, chess masters regarded his inimitable style with contempt and fear...>

Kasparov in his book <My great predecessors part III>, the book on Petrosian and Spassky, page 54, col 1 quotes Kotov saying that Fischer said <If Petrosian played more boldly, he would be the strongest player in the world>

I suggest that Petrosian was indeed the strongest player in the world in the early 1960s from 1960 to 1963 and that Petrosian was at his peak during this period.

I don't remember where I read that Fischer said that he liked the play of Petrosian more than that of Tal, Spassky or Botvinnik although he may have said it to Hort or to Gligorich.>

Thank you for the informative and thorough reply. I have read both of the books by Korchnoi and Kasparov though it has been quite some time. I agree with you regarding Petrosian's playing strength during this time as well.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  0ZeR0: <perfidious: <0Zer0>, that is a most insightful quote from Jordan and one I had never seen.

A bit of irony: the one time I saw Jordan play live, he made little impression (17 during a season in which his average was twice that), but teammate Horace Grant came through with a big game as Bulls crushed Knicks anyway.>

Horace Grant always did strike me as a dependable sidekick for MJ. One who would almost always come up big right when you needed him to.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: charles Oakley was always a little bitter that Bulls GM Jerry Krause swapped him to New York and then went out and got Grant, but Oak never had the offensive chops. Chicago doesn't win some of those rings without Grant.

Cheapskate Bulls later lost Grant to Miami, where he won a title there, too.

May-11-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime:

Is the great FIXER alive in that photo above ??

Just sayin ...

May-11-22  Petrosianic: <harrydavidchapman>: <Is the great FIXER alive in that photo above ??>

You WOULD ask a question like that, Killer duh lol

Jul-21-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: <Benzol><OZeRO> I sure did have the game score, but have misplaced it over all the years I have collected chess books/magazines/postal chess cards/ have probably thrown out more chess memorabilia than folks possess. <how did you get on> think I resigned in about 13 or 14 moves. I was an absolute beginner, just getting chess fever. I also played <Susan Polgar> when they called her by her Hungarian name and her hair was naturally curly/dark and very thick. Believe it was her first professional appearance in America as a chess professional. Hoping I can find these games scores by these two GM's I played. Also played John Curdo and my first chess event ever was a simul against Jimmy Rizzitano.
Jul-21-22  offramp: I am older when the great Petrosian died. He was pretty young.
Aug-13-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rudolf Zipperer: It's amazing that Petrosian only lost 3 out nearly 100 games after 1. c4?!

https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

Aug-13-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rudolf Zipperer: By the way, anyone know, why there's a different number of games after 1.c4?!

On this page, under most played openings, there are 96 games listed.

But, when you click on it there are 98 games listed?!

Strange ...

Aug-13-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Rudolf>, there are now fewer games than before, as I have reclassified some and propose to complete yet more. Most likely hundreds, if not thousands of games listed under A10-19 are assigned incorrect codes.
Aug-14-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rudolf Zipperer: <perfidious: <Rudolf>, there are now fewer games than before, as I have reclassified some and propose to complete yet more. Most likely hundreds, if not thousands of games listed under A10-19 are assigned incorrect codes.>

Thanks <perfidious>! That makes sense. Opening classifications seems like a nightmare to me, with all the move orders and transpositions.

Aug-14-22  Ron: <Rudolf Zipperer: It's amazing that Petrosian only lost 3 out nearly 100 games after 1. c4?! https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

And one of those losses was an uncharacteristic speculative attack against...Mikhail Tal!

Petrosian vs Tal, 1976

Aug-14-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Rudolf Zipperer: <Ron: <Rudolf Zipperer: It's amazing that Petrosian only lost 3 out nearly 100 games after 1. c4?! https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

And one of those losses was an uncharacteristic speculative attack against...Mikhail Tal!

Petrosian vs Tal, 1976>

Very true. They were good friends after all, weren't they? Would explain that game. Petrosian mimicking Tal. "Living legends." ... "Barely living" ...

Nov-01-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: Petrosian has almost as many draws as Botvinnik has total games played. He was truly hard to beat.
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