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King's Indian Attack (A07)
1 Nf3 d5 2 g3

Number of games in database: 31526
Years covered: 1850 to 2022
Overall record:
   White wins 34.9%
   Black wins 33.5%
   Draws 31.6%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Bassem Amin  188 games
Tomasz Markowski  123 games
Sergei Movsesian  98 games
Ivan Farago  74 games
Pia Cramling  60 games
Bojan Kurajica  58 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Petrosian vs Pachman, 1961
Fischer vs Myagmarsuren, 1967
Fischer vs Panno, 1970
Geller vs Averbakh, 1954
Ljubojevic vs Kasparov, 1983
Chigorin vs Lasker, 1899
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-13-07  nescio: <suenteus po 147> <<1.Nf3 and 2.g3 is a good choice and can lead to all kinds of positions> Many players (both here and of course certain GMs) have said the same thing. I'm curious to know why you think that is (and what the benefit of "all kinds of positions" is).>

I meant that the position of the central pawns isn’t determined immediately. After 1.Nf3, 2.g3, 3.Bg2, 4.0-0 you can still choose between set-ups with i) d4, c4 and Nc3 ii) e4, d3, c3 and Nbd2, iii) c4, d3, Nc3 and e3 or even e4, iiii) c4, e3, b3 and Bb2 and possibly a few others. Which one you select will depend on your preference, your mood and on the opponent’s build-up.

<<but if you want to know if it suits you, just play over quickly some games (50 or so) and see if you like them> I don't think I've ever heard this advice for sampling an opening before.>

I don’t know any other way. If you want to know how to play a certain opening you’ll have to see how the game might develop, looking at various characteristics, such as which squares often become strong or weak, which side attacks where frequently, and so on.

<< I'm also curious as to your definition of 'like.' For instance, I 'like most of Petrosian's games, but I don't really understand many of them :)>

I’m sorry, I have no other word. Some positions “feel good” and others don’t, even if the theoreticians give a different verdict. Petrosian is actually a good example. His games give me the impression that he didn’t care much about openings or middlegame theories and that he had his own highly individual ideas. That's why we often understand little of his moves at first glance.

<<I suggest you take out the repertoire explorer and look at the games of Barcza, Smyslov, Romanishin or Vaganian to name a few.> This sounds like instantly good advice. I'm becoming a devout follower of Smyslov's style and approach to play, and Vaganian is just too cool for school. Don't know much about Barcza or Romanishin, though.>

You seperated the two sentences which were in one paragraph. You can of course select the games of certain players to “sample” the opening. I mentioned these players specifically because they represent several different approaches.

May-13-07  diemjay: I just finished reading KIA: Starting Out, by John Emms. It is part of the Everyman Chess series. Great stuff. I'm a KIA convert and I intend to use it OTB as much as I can.

Cheers

May-13-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  ganstaman: <<I suggest you take out the repertoire explorer and look at the games of Barcza, Smyslov, Romanishin or Vaganian to name a few.> This sounds like instantly good advice. I'm becoming a devout follower of Smyslov's style and approach to play, and Vaganian is just too cool for school. Don't know much about Barcza or Romanishin, though.>

There is the Barcza System, right? Which is something that starts like this. I don't know precisely what it is, but if he got his name on it he must be good to look at.

Aha! Gedeon Barcza "The Opening 1.♘f3 d5 2.g3 known as the Barcza System is named after him."

May-17-07  diemjay: <gambitfan: 1. g3 d5 2. f3 f6 3. g2 c6 4. O-O g4 5. d3 bd7 6. bd2 e5 7. e4

In conclusion, I am not so much worried with the King's Indian Attack... Only an exceptionally brilliant player like Bobby Fischer or Garri Kasparov can afford to play this opening with reasonable winning chances...>

I'm not a brilliant player. However, I do enjoy playing the KIA.

I don't really feel that your 'example' opening is long enough to demonstrate the scope of KIA developement. There is tension just below the surface of this attack.

So...watch out for the Loch Ness monster.

Cheers

Jan-07-09  barrybackus: I am exploring the KIA. I find it really balanced for my level of play against most of black's openings.

I had a question regarding middlegame development though.

After you have your KIA set up...what is the best way for white to identify which side he should develop? What should I be looking for to advance on the Kingside? What about the Queenside? Any advice and sample PGNs would be very very appreciated.

Thanks!

Jul-01-09  WhiteRook48: I thought the King's Indian Attack wasn't initiated until white plays d2-d3 and e2-e4
Jul-05-09  WhiteRook48: does anyone have an idea of how I should play as White after 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 Bf5 4 0-0 Nc6? what gets the advantage?
Jul-06-09  MaxxLange: <WhiteRook48> I don't see much advantage for White

Black is refusing to play into a pure reversed KID by not playing ...c5. His move...Nc6 of course has the primitive threat of ...Nb4, which White can handle easily enough.

4...Nc6!? also avoids the standard kind of Lasker setup against the KIA or Reti, which would be 4...c6 (the "London System" is Black's anti-Reti reversed, actually)

So, the road to fighting for an advantage may be to ask, what is wrong with Black blocking his c pawn? What kind of situation will make the Nc6 sort of useless, or make Black need to push his c-pawn but not be able to push it?

At this point in the game, you are totally uncommitted, except to making a KID kingside with White. You need to move a center pawn pretty soon...what center configurations are good for the Nc6? avoid those!

Jun-06-10  JoustingWindmills: Diemjay, if you like Emms KIA book, try Don Maddux's KIA! His experience as a teacher really helps in the book organization IMHO. He starts with KIA approaches agains the French, CK, Sicilian et al and then goes into various structures for both black and white. Too, it has the training DB along with 21,000 gameas. I consider this book, along with Oleinikov's QID to be the best opening presentations around. They are both available in the Chessbase ebook format too.

Sorry if I sound like a commercial but this cd is a cut above.

Jan-10-11  philchess: How do I get into the King's Indian Attack after 1.g3 e5?
Jan-10-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: <philchess: How do I get into the King's Indian Attack after 1.g3 e5?> Here are some King's Indian Attack games starting with 1.g3 e5 - http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches.... They should give you an idea of the different variations.
Sep-08-11  Elrathia Kingi: A recent Ponomariov-Bruzon game (Ponomariov vs L Bruzon, 2011) featured 6...a5 and 7...a4, which seems to violate everything I have ever learned about developing pieces, not losing tempo, and paying attention to the center. What is the theory behind those moves?
Nov-25-11  Eric Farley: This site's classification of the King's Indian Attack is not correct. The Reti-Rubinstein 1923 game, for instance, is NOT a KIA. It's a Reti-Barcza system; as a matter of fact, in his book "Masters of the Chessboard" Reti used this game as a model to show his system. Today it's like this:
1. Nf3 d5 2.c4 it's a "pure" Reti
1. Nf3 d5 2.g3 and then c4 it's a Reti-Barcza

If there's an early c4, after g3, it's a Reti-Barcza. If there's an early d4, it may be a Grunfeld Reversed or a Catalan. If there's an early e4, then it's a King's Indian Attack. Needless to say, transpositions in this area abound. People interested in these systems might consult Keene's good book "Flank Openings."

Nov-25-11  MaxxLange: <What is the theory behind those moves?> Black often plays to gain space on the Queenside against these systems. In the game you cite, it looks like he can get away with doing this so early because White's development is also slow.
Dec-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

King's Indian Attack
1.♘f3 d5 2.g3


click for larger view

Mar-10-12  darshandatta: I use KIA against french defence
Nov-05-13  yoyomama: How do I download a PGN database of all KIA games?
Nov-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: <yoyomama> Not enough moves, too many games in DB, make one more move and select "PGN Download" on top of the games listing section.
Oct-29-19  Chesgambit: I played Caro-kann defense every time aganist e4 ıf white play d3 Fischer vs I Ibrahimoglu, 1970 Immortal match
Oct-29-19  Chesgambit: play Tarrasch varition aganist French or KIA (Sugar NN lose aganist ( played e6)Tarrasch varitipn positional pawn sacrfice varition)
Jun-23-22  suenteus po 147: Is the Keres variation just 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Bg4 3.Bg2 Nd7 or are there additional moves?
Jun-23-22  Z free or die: <suenteus po 147> According to SCID's classification those are the moves.

(Although SCID doesn't give that particular opening a specific subcode beyond the A07 code)

Jun-23-22  suenteus po 147: <Z free or die> Thanks!
Jun-23-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: (A07) variations:

Reti, King's Indian attack (Barcza system)
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3

Reti, King's Indian attack, Yugoslav variation
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 c6 4. O-O Bg4

Reti, King's Indian attack, Keres variation
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Bg4 3. Bg2 Nd7

Reti, King's Indian attack
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6

Reti, King's Indian attack, Pachman system
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O e5 5. d3 Ne7

Reti, King's Indian attack (with ...c5)
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 c5

This post is so true:
<Nov-25-11 Eric Farley: This site's classification of the King's Indian Attack is not correct. The Reti-Rubinstein 1923 game, for instance, is NOT a KIA. It's a Reti-Barcza system; as a matter of fact, in his book "Masters of the Chessboard" Reti used this game as a model to show his system. Today it's like this: 1. Nf3 d5 2.c4 it's a "pure" Reti
1. Nf3 d5 2.g3 and then c4 it's a Reti-Barcza
If there's an early c4, after g3, it's a Reti-Barcza. If there's an early d4, it may be a Grunfeld Reversed or a Catalan. If there's an early e4, then it's a King's Indian Attack. Needless to say, transpositions in this area abound. People interested in these systems might consult Keene's good book "Flank Openings.">

1.g3 is the (A00) Hungarian Opening. It is also called the Benko Opening (not the Benko Gambit). It certainly can transpose to the KIA if White plays Bg2, d3, Nf3, 0-0, and e4 in any order, perhaps with Nbd2, c3, and Qc2 helping to support e4.

The King's Indian Attack is a reversed King's Indian Defense. The King's Indian Attack may start in the center 1.e4, 2.d3, 3.Nbd2. Study Bobby Fischer's (A07) games: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

Jun-23-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: This confirms: https://gambiter.com/chess/openings...
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