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Siegbert Tarrasch vs Fritz Riemann
"Riemann Geometry" (game of the day Sep-12-2020)
Breslau (1879), Breslau GER
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Cordel Variation (C67)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
May-24-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: If 19.Qe4, then 19...Kf8 20.Qf4 Qd5+ 21.Rf3 Rxg5
Sep-08-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Well, in case of 19.Qe4 simple 19...Qd5 20.Qxd5 Bxd5+ 21.Kg1 Rxg5+ 22.Kf2 Rg2+ 23.Ke1 Rxc2 is even more devasting. And 19.Qf4 Qd5+ 20.Rf3 can continue with 20...0-0-0 (it is better than immediate Rxg5, which is playable too) 21.h4 (or else Rxg5) 21...h6 and white is toast.
Sep-12-20  offramp: The pun for today is topical because a few days ago the Breakthrough Prize in maths was awarded. Some limey won $3,000,000 for his thoughts on transformative contributions to the theory of stochastic analysis, particularly the theory of regularity structures in stochastic partial differential equations, or something.
Sep-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <offramp>: Riemannian geometry has nothing to do with <transformative contributions to the theory of stochastic analysis, particularly the theory of regularity structures in stochastic partial differential equations.>
Sep-12-20  offramp: <al wazir: <offramp>: Riemannian geometry has nothing to do with <transformative contributions to the theory of stochastic analysis, particularly the theory of regularity structures in stochastic partial differential equations.>>

That's strange. I thought it had a <little bit> to do with transformative contributions to the theory of stochastic analysis, particularly the theory of regularity structures in stochastic partial differential equations, although I admit that my knowledge of transformative contributions to the theory of stochastic analysis, particularly the theory of regularity structures in stochastic partial differential equations is a little rusty.

Sep-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Tarrasch might have underestimated Riemann. 13.Nd2 threatens a massive central buildup and attack with 14.Nf3, 15.Bf4 and 16.Rae1, but if 13...Bg5; 14.Nb3,Bxc1; 15.Raxc1 and now White has a huge lead in development and is well placed for Queen side operations.
Sep-12-20  Brenin: While Sir Martin Hairer, Professor of Probability and Stochastic Analysis at Imperial College London, does not work explicitly on Riemannian geometry, the subject would be as familiar to him as the pavement outside his house. See https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.02884, for example.
Sep-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: This is from the period they called Siegbert the 'Breslau Morphy'. But not for long.
Sep-12-20  herttach: Some limey won $3,000,000. Not British but Austrian. Works in an English university. A significant number of mathematicians worldwide do not fully understand his work.
Sep-12-20  offramp: I meant limey in the stochastic, or Pickwickian, sense.
Sep-12-20  catlover: Wanting to clear up what "Reimann geometry" was, I looked it up in Wikipedia.

"Riemannian geometry is the branch of differential geometry that studies Riemannian manifolds, smooth manifolds with a Riemannian metric, i.e. with an inner product on the tangent space at each point that varies smoothly from point to point. This gives, in particular, local notions of angle, length of curves, surface area and volume. From those, some other global quantities can be derived by integrating local contributions." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riema...

Well, that sure clarifies things, doesn't it?

Sep-12-20  RandomVisitor: Apparently 17.Nd2 keeps things even:


click for larger view

Stockfish_20090822_x64_modern:
NNUE evaluation using nn-308d71810dff.nnue enabled

<46/75 08:08 -0.02 17.Nd2 Rg8 18.h3 Qd6 19.Rf4> 0-0-0 20.Nb3 Rde8 21.Qd4 Bf5 22.Qf2 Re2 23.Qxe2 Qxf4 24.Rf1 Qg3+ 25.Qg2 Qxg2+ 26.Kxg2 Bxc2

Sep-12-20  RandomVisitor: The uncommon 8...Nf5 invites 9.Qe4! and a nice game for white:


click for larger view

Stockfish_20090822_x64_modern:
NNUE evaluation using nn-308d71810dff.nnue enabled

<40/53 04:10 +0.81 9.Qe4 g6 10.c4> Bb7 11.Nc3 0-0 12.Rd1 Re8 13.Bf4 d6 14.h3 a5 15.c5 d5 16.Qc2 Ng7 17.Ne2 Ne6 18.Be3 Qd7

Sep-12-20  Brenin: <catlover>: Despite the jargon, it really isn't that difficult. If you understand the concepts of length, angle, area and volume in the ordinary 3-dimensional euclidean space we (think we) live in, then Riemannian geometry simply extends those concepts to smoothly curved spaces, such as the surface of the Earth, or the 4-dimensional space-time continuum appearing in general relativity. Understanding the Ruy Lopez is a much tougher proposition.
Sep-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: I have (and this is no joke) a cookbook called (I kid you not) "Manifold Destiny". It contains recipes for food you can cook by wrapping it in aluminum foil and placing it on top of your car's engine. Then, on a long trip, the heat of the engine will cook your food and you can enjoy it when you arrive at your destination.

In addition to recipes the book contains diagrams of different engines; in-line 4- and 6-cylinders, V-6s, and V-8s (presumably you will not attempt to cook any food in the engine compartments of your V-12 Ferrari or Lamborghini), the suitable places on the engine (you wouldn't want it to fall off or interfere with your engine's performance) to place your food depending on whether you need to cook it quickly at a high heat or slowly at a lower heat, and the length of your trip. It has a list of some specific cars, models, engines, and their suitability for cooking certain types of dishes, as well as the number of typical servings that can be cooked based on available space.

Each recipe provides a guide to the distance required to cook the food, although the authors caution you to think in terms of time, since during rush hour your dish might be cooked in 3 freeway rams. Some recipes have the name of the car used to cook it, such as 'Hyundai Halibut with Fennel' or 'Pat's Provolone Porsche Potatoes'. And probably most appropriate of all, something that will appeal to those who enjoy puns in this site, 'Chevrolet Stingray', for those who enjoy skate.

The book is available on Amazon for a not unreasonable US $ 16 for the paperback edition. And it is certainly good for a laugh or two. Unfortunately the book is rather dated, published in 2008 and it has not been updated. Modern car engines with their surrounding plastic coverings may not provide as many good places to cook your food, and the results may be different. And some of the reviewers have actually tried some of the recipes (I haven't tried any) with mixed results, so don't necessarily take the book seriously. As the saying goes, when it comes to manifold cooking, your mileage may vary.

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