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Robert James Fischer vs Ortvin Sarapu
Sousse Interzonal (1967), Sousse TUN, rd 5, Oct-21
French Defense: Classical. Burn Variation (C11)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: An interesting discrepancy in the gamescore arises about this game. This is the correct gamescore according to "The Games Of Robert J Fischer" by Wade & O'Connell. However, in "Mr Chess - The Ortvin Sarapu Story" by Ortvin Sarapu he says 24...♖b5 was played and not 24...♕b3. For the rest of game the scores agree. ChessBase also agrees with Wade. Lou Hayes book agrees with Wade up to move 28 but then says Fischer played 29.♕g5+ and not 29.♖e8+. So who do you believe? For myself I'm inclined to believe Sarapu since he actually played the game.

Btw this score Fischer vs O Sarapu, 1967 is incorrect.

Feb-19-04  drukenknight: I thought we're doing Souza NEXT month?
Feb-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <dk> I've been sitting on this one for some time but your comments at the Kibitzers Cafe spurred me into action. We're only a little early anyway.
Feb-19-04  drukenknight: I would guess the correct move would be the one Sarapu says since he was probably looking at his game score when he wrote his book. IF both players were writing quickly it is more likely that Fischer would have wrote down his opponents move wrong, then Sarapu would mistype his own move.
May-04-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: A beautifully smooth performance by Fischer against an opponent who does not seem to make any obvious error. Later it transpired that castling was too dangerous, and <14...h6> was recommended.

This game is a warning aginst underestimating White's enduring initiative in the Burn (and also the Rubinstein) variation of the French.

I think that the ending shown is someone's analysis not the actual game which I understand finished:

<24...Qb3> 25.Qg4+ Kf8 26.Rd8+ Rxd8 27.Rxd8+ Ke7 28.Qg8 f5 29.Re8+ 1-0

May-04-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <Chessical> Your correct. This score in it's final moves is bogus. A closer score is this one Fischer vs O Sarapu, 1967 although even this may not be entirely correct. Before this game took place Russian Grandmaster Eduard Gufeld gave Sarapu some help with his opening preparation I believe.
May-28-04  drukenknight: Fischer at Souza. This one is kinda of a dud. The OConnell bio. says Re8+ was played at the end, like this game score shows.

Sarapu plays a little too cautious. 7....Qd5 in the early going might be better way to play this.

24...Rb5 that Sarapu claims was played does make sense, but then why not block the check w/ 25....Rg5? Maybe he just missed that.

He missed some other rook moves earlier in the game.

May-29-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Fischer took fifty-five minutes(!) to decide upon 14.f4 in this game. Does anyone know if he's ever taken longer to deliberate over a single move in a game?
May-29-04  drukenknight: YEs it took him even longer to play the first move in his match against Karpov in 1975. Oh wait! He still hasnt played it.
Aug-05-07  Zugzwango: The result is correct according to Agur's Bobby Fischer His Approach to Chess (pg.237). It was a blunder by Fischer (he puts the rook en prise for nothing), but Sarapu resigned. The forced mate in 3 was 29. Qg5+ f6 30. Qg8, and 31. Qe8/Qf8#. There was also a forced mate in 4 starting with 29. Qf8+. However, the database of CM9000 shows the 29th move to be Qg5+. Despite the discrepancy, I feel Augr's account of the game is more credible due to his abundant research in the Royal Dutch Library in The Hague.
Feb-24-08  HOTDOG: 24...Qb3? was obviously a blunder,but however White had already a won position
Sep-19-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: This game was played on three tables. Fischer asked the arbiter to shift the game twice because of poor lighting. Sarapu jokingly commented to Fischer "Are we playing musical chairs" to which Fischer just smiled. Sarapu agreed that the lighting was very poor and that he wasn't disturbed by Fischer's requests to move tables as it was Fischer's clock that was running while the table shifts were taking place.
Sep-19-08  ughaibu: Well, it was the 60s, they were probably playing by the glow of joss sticks.
Apr-26-09  madlydeeply: I suppose if 5. ...Be7, take with the bishop. If 5...Nbd7, take with the knight. Fischer loves queenside castling in the Burn and always seems to be a step ahead of dangerous looking black queenside attacks.
Aug-20-11  Zugzwangovich: <Benzol: An interesting discrepancy in the gamescore arises about this game. This is the correct gamescore according to "The Games Of Robert J Fischer" by Wade & O'Connell. However, in "Mr Chess - The Ortvin Sarapu Story" by Ortvin Sarapu he says 24...Rb5 was played and not 24...Qb3.> Fischer agrees with Sarapu in his 9/18/00 radio interview, stating that according to his own original gamescore Black's 24th was Rb5 and not Qb3.
Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Is it possible that the double table-change coincided with Fischer's 55-minute think?
May-11-14  sicilianhugefun: This is a good example of very strong centralization. The White queen was just so proud at e5
May-29-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Benzol: Fischer took fifty-five minutes(!) to decide upon 14.f4 in this game. Does anyone know if he's ever taken longer to deliberate over a single move in a game?>

Well it was a mistake. It isn't the best move. He may have been considering either 14. Nf5 or 14. Nb5 (14. Nb5 is slightly better) but Sarapu has Qc6 and the position is only slightly better for White, as Black has counter attacks on the c file.

After 14. f4 Rc5! and Fischer's position would not be so good. Black gains a small advantage.

Fischer had a small advantage but nothing significant. But that position of course is hard to play, although if Black brings his R to d8 instead of 17. ... Rc5?! he is well in the game. Fischer was less comfortable against the closed French and the Caro.

May-29-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Sarapu told me about this incident. He said he didn't mind as Fischer's clock was running! He thought the incident was interesting and amusing. It gave him one of the great stories he told as the one he told me about playing Kasparov...
Feb-27-16  PaulLovric: I have been talking to Sarapu's son. He is a friend of mine. He tells me his father use to train 8 hours every day plus wok full time.
Feb-27-16  RookFile: I'm actually glad to read this about the opening play. Played over this game just as a game of chess, and forgot that Fischer was white. Couldn't figure out what black was doing wrong and why he was supposed to lose this. As pointed out above, black even had an opportunity to sieze the advantage.
Feb-28-16  capafischer1: Fischer played accurately and seized the initiative with precise moves.
Aug-23-20  Zugzwangovich: How can Agur et al. claim that Fischer left a rook en prise with 29. Re8 when there's a queen on g8 guarding it?
Apr-22-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: Black had to play 24...Kg7 to try and stay in the game and be able to meet 25. Qg4+ with Kh6 where the King is relatively safe it seems.

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