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Jan Timman vs Werner Hug
Nice Olympiad qual-8 (1974), Nice FRA, rd 3, Jun-09
French Defense: Winawer. Retreat Variation Armenian Line (C18)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-19-06  zb2cr: For some reason I saw this one quickly, a matter of only a few seconds.
Dec-19-06  nimzo knight: 'LoveThat...' Thanks for analysis. It seems white has enough threats to keep the material advantage.
Dec-19-06  micartouse: A little easier than most Tuesdays. I tried Ra8+ right away, but it took about 5 or 10 seconds to follow it up with the right move.
Dec-19-06  sataranj: got it right away
Dec-19-06  TTLump: I love Tuesdays. If a 2440 player can make this kind of blunder, then there might be hope for us Patzers! Hug was a 22 year-old IM when he played this game and was most likely in time trouble.

Another interesting challenge related to this game would be to select the two moves for black that led to his demise, 1. the blunder that led to the loss of his Queen and 2. the tactical error that weakened his position leading to an almost certain loss in the end game.

Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I got this one easy-but thought there was more to it. The check at f4 looks good,but black can interpose at e5 with no loss.

In fact,white wins queen for rook as the knight is protected on e8 after taking the queen. (At first,I thought it was going to be queen for rook and knight).

Dec-19-06  Stonewaller2: After the text, as Black against anyone but Timman, my goal would be to simplify down to ♔+♕ vs. ♔+♖. Give me the ♖ every time . . .
Dec-19-06  LoveThatJoker: Happypuppet: Since there seems to be a dearth of topics to discuss, what would you propose as an alternative to a quickly losing 34...exf5? I was looking at 34...Kd6, which looks suicidal, but I think Black can get safe again before White can really take advantage of it. There seem to be few other choices.

---

34...Kd6 Unfortunately, doesn't work for Black, Happypuppet.

Even though I understand that you have asked for other alternatives and not stating that 34...Kd6 is the move, I will analyze the fault in this move and then conclude by giving you what I thought was Black's best try.

34...Kd6 does not work because

35. Nb5+ Ke7 (35...Kd5?? 36. Bc4#)

36. Qc5+ Kd8 (36...Kf7? 37. Nd6+ wins Q)

37. Ra8+ Bc8 (37...Nb8?? 38. Rxb8+ Bc8 39. Rxc8+ Kd7 40. Qc7#)

38. Rxc8+ Kxc8 39. Nd6+ winning the Q.

Therefore, although an honest try to get out of a jam, 34...Kd6? - and it does deserve the '?' because all of Black's subsequent moves are forced - does not work for Black.

Dec-19-06  LoveThatJoker: Now looking at the game again, Happypuppet, I believe that Black's undoing came as early as move 6, believe it or not!

6...cxd4?! is dubious. Of course, as Yasser Seirawan has stated, "center pawns are more valuable." But in this position after white himself has played the rather strange 6. b4?! the correct manner of proceeding was simply to capture on b4 with 6...cxb4. What can white do now?

Well he can try: A) 7. axb4 but where is the advantage for him really after 7...Bxb4. Nowhere.

B) 7. Nb5? is immediately refuted by 7...bxa3+!. So that is no good.

and now we come to the manoeuvre that gave White the initiative after Black's faulty reply to 6. b4?! cxd4?!

C) 7.Qg4 again ?! 7...Kf8! and White has nothing.

And if you don't think that my analysis is correct consider the fact that on Black's 34th move he did not want to exchange Queen's because he knew he would be down at least a pawn and in some lines even two.

Unfortunately throught the middle game Black spend most of his time trying to defend a pawn with poor manoeuvres.

Therefore simply put, as Gm Dzindzihashvilli has said..."Never ever violate the principles of chess." If you can win a pawn cleanly without complications, then win it!

I hope this helps.

LTJ

P.S. No problem, Nimzo Knight. With pleasure.

Dec-19-06  YouRang: Geez, a basic knight fork tactic, and it took me half of forever to find it! More coffee please.
Dec-19-06  Shajmaty: <LoveThatJoker: Now looking at the game again, Happypuppet, I believe that Black's undoing came as early as move 6, believe it or not! 6...cxd4?! is dubious. Of course, as Yasser Seirawan has stated, "center pawns are more valuable." But in this position after white himself has played the rather strange 6. b4?! the correct manner of proceeding was simply to capture on b4 with 6...cxb4.> I disagree.

6. b4 is the most often (more than 70%) played move in such a position, and also 6...cxd4 is much more often (like 20:1) played than 6...cxb4(?), which is answered by 7. Nb5! If then 7...bxa3(?), as U suggest, 8. c3 with a clear advantage (dark squares). Opening Theory, my friend.

Dec-19-06  zb2cr: Just for laughs:

Black plays 37. ... Kb8; 38. Nxe8, Bxe8; 39. Qxe8+, Kc7. Now 40. h4 and Black is nearly in <Zugswang>. His Knight is preventing too many dangerous checks to move, his Rook is forced to protect the Pawn at f5. Perhaps best is 40. ... Kd6.

Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: Rook sac plus Knight fork wins a big Hug!
Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Again, a microsecond to get this one.
Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Werner wanted to Hug the Timman, but it was not meant to be.
Dec-19-06  soberknight: For those who are unaware: it is a time-honored tradition here (no pun intended) for people to write, "I got this puzzle in the square root of 2 times 10 to the power of -7 seconds" or something of that ilk. It's just another way of saying, "This puzzle was so easy, and I'm so smart." I don't find it funny, but I've learned to tolerate it.
Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  howardb86: It took me the longest of all of ya' to get this, BUT I'm 68 years old and have not played chess for 45 years! What a great site this is. Oh yes, took me over a minute. Trying to get retooled for grandkids who are coming on learing the game in school. Imagine.
Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <For those who are unaware: it is a time-honored tradition here (no pun intended) for people to write, "I got this puzzle in the square root of 2 times 10 to the power of -7 seconds" or something of that ilk. It's just another way of saying, "This puzzle was so easy, and I'm so smart." I don't find it funny, but I've learned to tolerate it.> I coudln't solve ANY puzzle here until the last monday. Last week I solved 6 puzzles (only Sunday went wrong), and this week also both Mo and Tu. I din't try to be funny or tell I'm smart. If I would have spent an hour on it, I'd write "got it in 1 hour":-) But what should I write if I got it just by taking a really short look at the position????
Dec-19-06  be3292: <echo unlucky: Timman needed the hug .... goddit.
Dec-19-06  jimx: I wrote down the answer to this puzzle and sealed it in an envelope 2 weeks ago. Today I opened the envelope in front of several independent witnesses to confirm that I was indeed correct. Thus proving that I solved it in approximately negative 336 hours. *

* might be complete bollocks.

Dec-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  norami: If only they exchanged another pawn. Each player would have had one of each - king, queen, rook, bishop, knight, pawn.
Dec-19-06  GannonKnight: Got it right away!

Pretty easy given the positions of the white knight, black king and black queen. I looked for a fork opportunity.

I agree with the time trouble. It was move 36 and most tournaments have a time limit for 40 moves.

Dec-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: If you play through the game, it was an extremely exciting and well-played game. Without any deep analysis, I would have to say that Black was OK, and only lost near the end of this terrific struggle.
Jan-11-07  LoveThatJoker: Shajmaty: <LoveThatJoker: Now looking at the game again, Happypuppet, I believe that Black's undoing came as early as move 6, believe it or not! 6...cxd4?! is dubious. Of course, as Yasser Seirawan has stated, "center pawns are more valuable." But in this position after white himself has played the rather strange 6. b4?! the correct manner of proceeding was simply to capture on b4 with 6...cxb4.> I disagree. 6. b4 is the most often (more than 70%) played move in such a position, and also 6...cxd4 is much more often (like 20:1) played than 6...cxb4(?), which is answered by 7. Nb5! If then 7...bxa3(?), as U suggest, 8. c3 with a clear advantage (dark squares). Opening Theory, my friend.

Opening Theory changes, you condescending piss ant.

Black wins a pawn in exchange for the dark squares. If Black plays his cards right he can hold it! This is what I am saying. I am more inclined to win a pawn yet withstand pressure for it fool!

Jan-11-07  LoveThatJoker: Shajmaty: Look for this game

Hase, Ricardo - Rossetto, Hector D 1/2
Date: 1972.??.?? Tour. 49. ARG-ch pre-fn/B ECO: C17

See what I mean?! All your '?' in your analysis stink of superficiality and lack of original thinking.

STOP RELYING ON FRITZ AND THINK FOR YOURSELF!

LTJ

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