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Tigran V Petrosian vs Julius Kozma
Munich Olympiad Final-A (1958), Munich FRG, rd 5, Oct-15
Torre Attack: Classical Defense. Petrosian Gambit (A46)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-08-16  zb2cr: 41. Rxe7 wins material for White. The main line is 41. ... Rxe7; 42. f6+, Kf7; 43. fxe7, Kxe7; 44. Nxc5 with an easy win.

Black could also try 41. ... gxf5. White has a simple win after 42. Rxf7+, Kxf7; 43. gxf5.

Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  drollere: this is such a simple position that it has the distinct flavor of a composed problem. material is equal (if you think B and N are the same thing), and space also is about equal although white has a much more aggressive range of action.

by the usual process of imagining different moves and seeing what follows. white Ng5 or Nd6 seem obvious to force a black R move followed by white Rxe7+, but the B can capture either way. so pawns must be used instead.

the pawn fork is especially fun when it includes check without possibility of recapture. so:

41. Rxe7 Rxe7
42. f6+ Kf8
43. pxe7+ Kxe7
44. Nxc5 with an easy win.

emboldened by my success with yesterday's puzzle, this week i was going to start scoring myself by cumulating the number of moves i get correctly in each puzzle, up to a maximum of three (21 possible each week), which is either the soltis rule or the soltis version of the kasparov rule about how deep most moves are analyzed over the board. but if the opponent is going to quit, i'm taking the credit. so, 3 for 3 today.

Aug-08-16  Razgriz: Wow I did not see this at all.
Aug-08-16  lost in space: 41. Rxe7 Rxe7 42. f6 and game over
Aug-08-16  YouRang: Easy Monday


click for larger view

Quite easy - white clearly has a pawn fork in store. It doesn't work so well on a bishop, but it works great on a rook.

<41.Rxe7 Rxe7 42.f6+>


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White will end up a piece better after 42...Kf7 43.fxe7 Kxe7 44.Nxc5 which is an easy win in the endgame.

Aug-08-16  patzer2: Black's decisive mistake appears to be 37...Re5? allowing 38. Rxe5 to (+1.48 @ 21 depth, Deep Fritz 15).

Instead, 37...gxf5 38. gxf5 Rh6 keeps Black in the game.

Early in the opening, instead of 4...b6, I prefer 4...Nc6 as 5. d5 Qa5 6. c3 Nxd5 favors Black. Also preferable to 4...b6 is 4...Qb6 = or 4...d5=.

Aug-08-16  AlicesKnight: Nice simple 41.Rxe7; if ....Rxe7 then 42.f6+ wins the R and leaves White up a piece, safe enough to go and put the kettle on.....
Aug-08-16  YouRang: A couple late blunders by black:

First, after <37.f5>, black had this position:


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Black simplifies with probably draw simply with <37...gxf5 38.gxf5 Rh6>


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It continued, <37...Re5? 38.Rxe5 dxe5 39.Rd2>


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Here white threatens to pin the bishop with Rd7 then win it with the pawn fork. Black doesn't want to move the bishop since it guards against Nxc5. Black ought to just eliminate it with 39...gxf5 40.gxf5. Now, 40...Rf8 threatens Pf5 and the pawn fork threat is gone.

But instead, he went with <39...Rf8?>, which allowed the pin <40.Rd7>


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Black has no way to save the bishop, e.g. 40...Re8 31.f6+. Black tried <40...Rf7>, obviously not seeing the puzzle solution <41.Rxe7 >.

Aug-08-16  Cheapo by the Dozen: A Monday puzzle that's a Petrosian position.

A Monday puzzle that, rather than being a flashy mate, is a decisive endgame move after a long positional struggle.

Coincidence? You be the judge.

Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a knight for a bishop.

Black threatens gxf5.

White can win a piece with 41.Rxe7:

A) 41... Rxe7 42.f6+ Kf7 43.fxe7 Kxe7 44.Nxc5 + - [N].

B) 41... gxf5 42.Rxf7+ (or 42.gxf6) 42... Kxf7 43.gxf5 + - [N].

Aug-08-16  morfishine: <41.Rxe7> and White is a piece up

*****

Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <41.Rxe7>, and that's it.
Aug-08-16  Caissas Clown: Was 4..b6 the losing move? Or at least , a poor choice,conceding the initiative too soon? Surely 4..d5 , or even Qa5 , were better.
Aug-08-16  YetAnotherAmateur: 41. Rxe7 and black is simply down a piece. Trying to respond with 41. ... Rxe7 42. f6+ Kf7 43. fxe7 Kxe7 makes things only slightly less worse for black.
Aug-08-16  TheTamale: Like <Penguincw>, I also struggled to see this. I think I saw Petrosian's name and immediately got intimidated--how can I be expected to think like Petrosian? I finaly saw it, proving that even Iron Tigran occasionally found himself in Monday puzzle positions.
Aug-08-16  saturn2: RxB drags the black rook into the pin f6
Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: A decisive combination to win a piece: entertaining and instructive.
Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White sacs the exchange, then gains a whole rook. Monday WO queen sac.
Aug-08-16  kamotekayo: <YouRang:>
<Black simplifies with probably draw simply with <37...gxf5 38.gxf5 Rh6>> What if white plays Nxd6?
Aug-08-16  YouRang: <kamotekayo><<...draw simply with <37...gxf5 38.gxf5 Rh6>>

What if white plays Nxd6?>

If 38.Nxd6


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Probably 38...fxg4+ 39.Kxg4 Bxd6


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Black is up a bishop

Aug-08-16  TheFocus: A famous game.
Aug-08-16  indomega: Hmmm...not so sure about 24...Nb8. I would do

24... Bf6 25. Nxf6 Rxf6.

Aug-09-16  kamotekayo: <YouRang:>
<Black simplifies with probably draw simply with <37...gxf5 38.gxf5 Rh6>> What if white plays Nxd6? I mean 39.Nxd6 is it a draw?
Aug-09-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: <kamo> at some point Black will play Bxd6+ and it seems to me to be dead drawn, as an example:

37...gxf5 38. gxf5 Rh6 39. Nxd6 Rh3+ 40. Kg4 Rh4+ 41. Kg3 Bxd6+ 42. Rxd6 Rxe2 43. Kxh4 Rxa2


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Aug-09-16  YouRang: <kamotekayo><What if white plays Nxd6? I mean 39.Nxd6 is it a draw?>

Sorry, I misunderstood your earlier post. If <37...gxf5 38.gxf5 Rh6 39.Nxd6>


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I see that <OhioChessFan> already addressed this, but as he pointed out, <39...Rh3+!>


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How does white escape checks with any advantage?

- 40.Kg2 Rh2+! 41.Kxh2 Bxd6+ 42.Rxd6 Rxe2+ 43.Kg3 Rxa2 =

- 40.Kg2 Rh2+ 41.Kg1 Rxe2 42.Nxe8+ Kf8 Nc7 43.Rxa2 =

- 40.Kg4 Rh4+ 41.Kg3 Bxd6+ 42.Kxh4 Rxe2 43.Rxd6 Rxa2 =

- If the king tries to run behind the Re2: 40.Kf2 Rh2+ 41.Ke1


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41...Bh4+! drops a rook

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