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Reti Opening (A09)
1 Nf3 d5 2 c4

Number of games in database: 2534
Years covered: 1854 to 2021
Overall record:
   White wins 37.9%
   Black wins 30.1%
   Draws 32.0%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Iturrizaga Bonelli  40 games
Olga Zimina  26 games
Evgeny Tomashevsky  21 games
Antoaneta Stefanova  13 games
Salomon Flohr  12 games
Petr Haba  12 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Euwe vs Loman, 1923
Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937
Euwe vs Alekhine, 1927
B Andonov vs Lputian, 1987
T Hillarp Persson vs I Sokolov, 2009
Lisitsin vs Capablanca, 1935
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 page 1 of 102; games 1-25 of 2,534  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Shumov vs C Jaenisch 0-1431854St Petersburg m1A09 Reti Opening
2. Euwe vs G Kroone  1-0221923AmsterdamA09 Reti Opening
3. Euwe vs Loman 1-0181923RotterdamA09 Reti Opening
4. A Rozenshain vs V Bliumberg  0-1301924Ch BelarusA09 Reti Opening
5. S Takacs vs Rubinstein 1-0381924MeranoA09 Reti Opening
6. Tartakower vs Janowski 1-0321924New YorkA09 Reti Opening
7. Reti vs Janowski 1-0431924New YorkA09 Reti Opening
8. K Piltz vs S Rosselli del Turco  ½-½421924Paris Unofficial OlympiadA09 Reti Opening
9. P Romanovsky vs Dus Chotimirsky 1-0561924USSR ChampionshipA09 Reti Opening
10. NN vs Lasker 0-1221924Simul, 36bA09 Reti Opening
11. Deutsch vs Koni 1-061925WenenA09 Reti Opening
12. Euwe vs Spielmann ½-½561925WiesbadenA09 Reti Opening
13. F C Short vs M Romi  0-1321925Scarborough-AA09 Reti Opening
14. Tartakower vs Spielmann 1-0261925MoscowA09 Reti Opening
15. B Verlinsky vs Rubinstein 1-0651925MoscowA09 Reti Opening
16. Ratner vs M Romi  0-1401926Paris-ch 1926/27A09 Reti Opening
17. Lokvenc vs Leonhardt  1-0271926DSV KongressA09 Reti Opening
18. Tarrasch vs Alekhine 0-1581926SemmeringA09 Reti Opening
19. Reti vs Nimzowitsch 0-1691926SemmeringA09 Reti Opening
20. Reti vs K Havasi 1-0351926BudapestA09 Reti Opening
21. Kupchik vs Showalter  0-1521926ChicagoA09 Reti Opening
22. Carlos Torre vs Ed. Lasker 0-1481926ChicagoA09 Reti Opening
23. Bogoljubov vs P F Johner 1-0251926BerlinA09 Reti Opening
24. Kostic vs Przepiorka  0-1451926MeranoA09 Reti Opening
25. Reti vs G A Thomas 1-0841926Hastings 1926/27A09 Reti Opening
 page 1 of 102; games 1-25 of 2,534  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-06-04  Slovensko: This is one of my favorite openings because it requires great patience and careful maneuvers. Although it often doesn't give white too much, I like to play it as white along with the English/Queen's Pawn.

I have one problem with it though...After 2...dxc4, what is the best continuation for white? Is it 3.Qa4+, 3.e4, 3.e3, 3.g3 or the awkward(sp?)-looking 3.Na3 move?

Feb-06-04  Benjamin Lau: The opening explorer at first suggests that 3. Na3 is the best but searching farther down the line, one sees that black equalizes easily with correct opening play. The best continuation, looking about 8 moves deep is e3 transposing into a form of the Queen's Gambit Accepted, which is quite good for white and you since you play queen's pawn, this should not be difficult for you. The game would probably continue like this: Opening Explorer
Feb-13-04  marcus13: Can this position can be gain by 1.c4 d5 2.Nf3 or is there a refutation to this move order.
Feb-13-04  Benjamin Lau: I don't like this opening. When I play the Reti (as white), I normally refuse to enter this. Black can play 2...d4!? to great effect in practical games. White has trouble justifying his lack of space in the center and if he fails to crack d4, must seek play on the wings.
May-06-04  ruylopez900: But Lau, play on the wings is What hypermodernism is all about =D (though I admit they don't reccomend handing the centre over on a silver platter)
May-06-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: 2...d4 is actually a rather poor choice. You'll notice that white scores well after 3. b4. Black will have some difficulty maintaining his center (usually requiring the weakening ...f6), while Whites play is very fluid and natural. Additionally white often has opportunities to enter a reversed Benko Gambit with an extra tempo, which is eminently acceptable (especially since I play the Benko as black)!
May-06-04  Benjamin Lau: I never said 2...d4!? is completely correct of course. I just think that when you have the white pieces, you should try to squeeze out your initiative by gaining space in the center, preferably in a classical manner (that's of course my style with the white pieces), not by playing on the wings like in the Benko or the KID. I know the tenets of hypermodernism but usually prefer to use them with the black pieces.
May-06-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: <by gaining space in the center, preferably in a classical manner> Then I don't think 1. Nf3 is for you. ;-)
May-06-04  Benjamin Lau: Lol, I do prefer 1. d4. But it really depends on the scenario. I've found that some people respond very poorly against the Reti, it gives them nothing solid to "setup" against, so which one I employ is just a matter of who I'm playing. On a random note, I retract my statement about the KID being bad (on another page.) I played it a few times recently with the black pieces and whether it fails miserably or blows your opponent off the board seems mostly style again. I've found that it works wonders particularly against computers. I've decided to add that fun opening to my repertoire again. ;)
May-07-04  ruylopez900: <Benjamin Lau> Yes, computers never do seem to get the hang of hypermodern openings, it seems they almost realx =D. As for the Reti It can also easily trasnpose into several openings if you feel like giving your Opponent an inferior position (if they've co-operated of course ;))
May-07-04  Lawrence: <ruy>, excuse me, did you say "trasnpose"? :-)
May-07-04  ruylopez900: oops. Tyop. =D hehe
Dec-07-04  drukenknight: See agent, this is what I am complaining about. Reti A09. If I go to the home page and put in Reti for the opening, it only gives me to A04-06. So now there are at least four folders where my original Reti posts were and now I cant find any of them!
Dec-07-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: Indeed it would seem that A09 is a bit out of place.
Dec-07-04  drukenknight: Its just that how can I be sure I have seen all Reti categories? If I put moves into the opening explorer it gives me tons of games, but when you look at games in that list it only lists one categorization for each game, is it possible alternative ECO categories are not listed (i.e. when you dispaly a list of games).
Dec-16-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: Last weekend I scored 3 out of 4 on board 3 in the State Team Championship. I was rather proud of this game. The ending looks strange due to a time scramble.

[Event "State Team Championship"]
[Date "2004.12.12"]
[Round "2"]
[White "AgentRgent"]
[Black "Guy in a Baseball Cap"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 d5 3. c4 d4 4. b4 Nf6 5. bxc5 Nc6 6. d3 Qa5+ 7. Nbd2 g6 8. Bb2 e5 9. Bg2 Bxc5 10. O-O Ba3 11. Bxa3 Qxa3 12. Qb3 Qe7 13. Ng5 O-O 14. Nge4 Nxe4 15. Nxe4 f5 16. Nd2 Be6 17. Rfb1 Rf7 18. Rb2 Qc7 19. Rab1 Rb8 20. Qa4 Rff8 21. Nb3 e4 22. Nc5 Bc8 23. dxe4 b6 24. Nd3 Be6 25. exf5 Bd7 26. fxg6 Ne5 27. gxh7+ Kh8 28. Qc2 Bf5 29. Rc1 Ng4 30. Qd2 Rbd8 31. Bd5 Qxh7 32. h4 Rd6 33. Nf4 Qg7 34. Kg2 Rxd5 35. cxd5 Be4+ 36. Kf1 Bxd5 37. Rb5 Qe5 38. Rxd5 Ne3+ 39. Qxe3 Qg7 40. Rh5+ Kg8 41. Rg5 dxe3 42. Rxg7+ Kxg7 43. Ne6+ Kf7 44. Nxf8 exf2 45. Kxf2 Kxf8 46. Rc8+ Ke7 47. Rc7+ Kd6 48. Rxa7 Kc5 49. Rc7+ Kd4 50. e3+ Kd5 51. h5 b5 52. h6 b4 53. h7 b3 54. axb3 Kd6 55. Rc1 Kd5 56. h8=Q Ke4 57. Qd4+ Kf5 58. g4+ Kg5 59. Rc5+ Kh4 60. Rh5# 1-0

Comments anyone? ... anyone? ... Buehler? ... Buehler? ;-)

Dec-16-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <AgentRgent> Congratulations on your fine score! Looks like your opponent (GIABC lol) slightly misplayed the opening, grabbing space with 3 ... d4 but then the inconsistent 7 ... g6!? followed by 8 ... e5 & 9 ... Bxc5. Please review some potential missed tactics. After 17. Rfb1 Rf7?! note 18. Qxb7! wins a Pawn = 18 ... Qxb7 19. Rxb7 Rxb7 (19 ... Ne7? 20. Rxe7 Rxe7 21. Bxa8) 20. Bxc6 regains the exchange after 20 ... Rab8 21. Bxb7 Rxb7 or 20 ... Rb2 21. Bxa8 Rxd2 22. Kf1 (although here Black's Rook on the second rank is annoying). Tripling on the b file was strong yet slower. Then after 20 ... Rff8 21. Bxc6 wins a Pawn = 21 ... bxc6 22. Rxb8 Rxb8 23. Rxb8+ Qxb8 24. Qxc6 hitting the Be6 while the Nd2 covers b1 - maybe 24 ... Kf7 25. Nb3 with a bind. After 22 ... Bc8?! 23. Na6 wins the exchange, whereas 23. de b6 24. Nd3 won a Pawn. Looks like 34 ... Rxd5!? was desperation and you defended well, but 37 ... Qe5?? 38. Ng6+ wins faster than 38. Rxd5. Then 40. Rh5+ Kg8 41. Qe6+ Qf7 42. Qh6 was the way to go (42 ... Qg7 43. Rg5; 42 ... Qh7 43. Rg5+; otherwise 43. Qh8+ & 44. Rh7+). Finally, 46. Rc7 was the ideal technique, bringing the King up to force mate. Nice game!
Dec-17-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: <tpstar:> Thanks for the comments. I often overlook tactics like you mentioned, though in some cases I just prefer to keep a better position rather than winning a pawn (i.e. 18. Qxb7 through 21...Rxd2 & 21. Bxc6).

Also doesn't <22 ... Bc8?! 23. Na6> lose a piece to 23...bxa6 24. Rxb8 Nxb8! ?

Anyway, thanks again for the analysis.

Dec-17-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <AgentRgent> Of course it does - I was just making sure you were paying attention. ;>) Sorry, forgot how the Nc6 covers the Rb8, so good for you for avoiding that goof! I liked your overall strategy of Queenside pressure, with the major pieces plus the Bg2, but at some point I would have cashed it in and grabbed the Pawn. Boo ya.
Dec-17-04  fred lennox: <AgentRgent> I enjoyed your exellent game. Thank you for sharing it. The way you sustain the tension, instead of automatically simplify, is admirable. To allow for counterplay but to control it, is for me, the essence of good strategy.
Dec-17-04  ArtNJ: AgentRegent, nice game. Suggest reviewing 13. e3!, which I think is even stronger then your sequence.
Dec-17-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: <ArtNJ> I know that e3 is common move in many reversed Benoni lines, but I didn't like the look of it here. After 13. e3 dxe3 14. fxe3 White's prospects on the f file seem offset by his own weak pawns. Did you have something specific in mind?
Mar-25-05  ongyj: <AgentRgent> I find your game really well played and enjoyed reviewing it:) I just want to challenge your view on 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 d4 is a mistake on Black's part. At move 2 Black's alternatives are 2...dxc4 or c6 or e6. Of course c6 and e6 may lead to QGD if White desires. Don't you find 2...dxc4 worse? With this move White has pawn majority on the centre and an open c file. Of course Black has compensations, which balances out in the opening. What I'm trying to say is that 2...d4 is not wrong. Black has made the choice of trying to keep the game ugly. 3.b4 e6 and now it's up the White to move. Will it spend a move to keep the b pawn under attack, or will it go for 4.Be2 attacking Black's d pawn right away? But is Black really toast here? I just can't agree on that. Anyone to offer more insights that I overlooked? Thanks!
Jun-17-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: Here's my latest excursion into the wonderful world of the Reti.

Silver vs Gold

[White "AgentRgent"]
[Black "MrGolden"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 Nf6 3. cxd5 Nxd5 4. b3 Nc6 5. Bb2 e6 6. g3 Nf6 7. Bg2 Bd6 8. d3 e5 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. O-O Re8 11. Ng5 Bf5 12. e4 Bg4 13. Qc1 Qd7 14. Re1 h6 15. Ngf3 Bh3 16. Bh1 Rac8 17. a3 Nh5 18. b4 a6 19. Nc4 f5 20. exf5 Qxf5 21. Nh4 Qf6 22. Bd5+ Kh8 23. Be4 Ne7 24. Nf3 Nf5 25. Ncxe5 Bxe5 26. Nxe5 Rxe5 27. Bxe5 Qxe5 28. Bxb7 Qd4 29. Bxc8 Nfxg3 30. Bxh3 Nf4 31. Bf1 Nxf1 32. Re8+ Kh7 33. Qxf1 Ne2+ (time) 34. Rxe2 1-0

Jun-17-05  aw1988: Lol. You have entertaining opponents, Mr. Rgent. Guy in a baseball cap must have been a ferocious sight.
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