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David Bronstein vs Felix Winiwarter
Krems (1967), Krems AUT, Sep-??
Spanish Game: Closed Variations. Worrall Attack Delayed castling line (C86)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-08-07  acirce: 36.Ndxc4! Not the most common of ideas in the Ruy - the positional piece sacrifice on c4. Still very much worth knowing about.

Fritz finds the sac very much quicker than Rybka - almost immediately. Rybka keeps on suggesting lines that solely consist of placing a knight on f5 and randomly shuffling White's pieces around on the first three ranks and calls it "+1.2" which of course is just a meaningless number. But it realizes the sac is good when you enter it.

Oct-10-15  Brown: So many times on the Black side of the Ruy at least one of Black's Ns are misplaced. This is an extreme case.
May-30-16  DrGridlock: In "200 Open Games" Bronstein reports interesting kibbitzing during the game between himself and vice-president of the Institute of Geological Research, Yakov Stanislavovich Eventov.

After 18 d5:
Eventov: "Are you sure you don't want d5 for a piece?"

Bronstein: did not have time for a reply

After 21 a5:
Eventov: "Are you really counting on breaking through on the King-side?"

Bronstein: "I don't want to break through on the king-side at all."

After 25 h5:
Eventov: "Have you decided to play for a draw as white?"

Bronstein: "I'm beginning to win now."
...
"I played a5 to take away b6 from the black knight, and then h5 so that this same knight should not leap onto g6. That means its fate is clear: to travel the route from f8-h7-f8-d7 and back again. ... life is not too easy for black's second knight either ... the pawn on d5 keeps both knights in. ... I shall sacrifice on c5, and I have rather more means of breaking through than Black has of defending this pawn."

The position with White to move after 35 ... Ne3 is an interesting one.

David Bronstein - Felix Winiwarter


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Computers will see (as Rybka did above, and Komodo did for me), that White has a large positional advantage (1.8 or so for Komodo's eval), but can't quite come to make the sacrifice on c5 that accomplishes the breakthrough. Until getting quite deep into the eval, Komodo wants to "dither" around moving White's pieces are preserving his positional advantage without sacrificing any material. It's only at larger plies that Komodo finally wants to break through on c5.

Most humans, like Eventov and Winiwarter, don't see the paralysis that is in black's position before the sacrifice.

Mar-02-21  Brown: Karpovian play and thinking from Bronstein here, as quoted by the kibitzing above.
Mar-03-21  Olavi: It would have been stylish to resign after 26.Nf5+. Perhaps a bit arrogant too, but black is dead lost.

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