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Reuben Fine vs Robert Levenstein
Ch Marshall Chess Club (1932), New York, NY USA, rd 6, Nov-06
Old Indian Defense: General (A53)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: The final position is a forced zugzwang loss for Black with BLACK TO MOVE. For example, 63...Kb6 64.Kb4 Kb7 65.Kb5 etc. (If 64...Ka6 65.Kc5 Ka5 66.b4+ etc.) The White king will be able to lead his pawn to promotion and control the b8 promotion square. Therefore, Black resigned.

However, if it were WHITE TO MOVE instead, it's a draw because the Black king would be able to copy the White king (gain/maintain the opposition) to force a draw (by eventual stalemate Kb6 & Pb7 vs Kb8 or three-fold repetition of the position, or capture the pawn if abandoned). Simply getting in front of his White pawn is not enough for the White king, because he will not be able to remain there once Black mirrors on the b-file. If the Black king could move last to mirror the White king, the White king could make no forward progress. White must not lead with the pawn!

Aug-14-19  gambitfan: 1) mated-in-22 (46 ply) 63...♔b6 64.♔b4 ♔a6 65.♔c5 ♔b7 66.♔b5 ♔a7 67.♔c6 ♔a8 68.b4 ♔b8 69.♔b6 ♔a8 70.b5 ♔b8 71.♔a6 ♔c7 72.b6+ ♔c8 73.♔a7 ♔d7 74.b7 ♔e6 75.b8=♕ ♔f5 76.♔b6 ♔e4 77.♔c5 ♔f5 78.♔d5 ♔g4 79.♕e5 ♔f3 80.♔d4 ♔f2 81.♔e4 ♔g2 82.♕f4 ♔g1 83.♔f3 ♔h1 84.♕g5 ♔h2 85.♕g2#
Aug-14-19  gambitfan: gambitfan: <fredthebear: However, if it were WHITE TO MOVE instead, it's a draw because the Black king would be able to copy the White king (gain/maintain the opposition) to force a draw (by eventual stalemate Kb6 & Pb7 vs Kb8 or three-fold repetition of the position, or capture the pawn if abandoned). Simply getting in front of his White pawn is not enough for the White king, because he will not be able to remain there once Black mirrors on the b-file. If the Black king could move last to mirror the White king, the White king could make no forward progress. White must not lead with the pawn!>

What you say is right at move 63. The endgame King + Pawn against lone King is obtained some moves earlier and White had the choice to get in opposition with the adverse King and then win the game

61. Ke4 ! wins and not 61. Kd4 ? draws

Nov-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: The game data given for this game (January 9, 1932, round 10) are incorrect. This would place the game near the end of the 1931/32 Marshall CC Championship. Fine did defeat Levenstein in that tournament, but the game score (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, January 28, 1932) is not the game on this page.

Instead, this game was from the championship begun in late 1932 and completed by the end of the year (the complete results can be found int he Brooklyn Daily Eagle, December 29, 1932). I have not found the game in BDE, but it does appear in the American Chess Bulletin December 1932, p. p.184. (This issue also has a report on the tournament, with full results.)

However, I have not been able to track down the date or round number any further.

Nov-14-19  Retireborn: <Phony Benoni> Woodger's book (1st edition) gives this as round 6, played November 6 1932. Source is Fine's own notebook, apparently.

A ? is attached to 39...b6.

Nov-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Retireborn> Thanks.
Nov-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: By the way, Black's losing coming comes right after the rook trade <59...Rxe3+ 60.Kxe3>:


click for larger view

Now <61...Ke7!> draws. If White's king moves toward the pawn along the third rank, Black's king moves along the seventh. If the White king advances to the fourth rank, Black's king moves up to the third, If White pushes the pawn, Black will be able to block it in a drawable position.

This is an example of the Distant Opposition, rarely seen outside beginner books.

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