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Albert Becker vs Max Euwe
Karlsbad (1929), Karlsbad CSR, rd 5, Aug-05
Russian Game: Three Knights Game (C42)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-01-09  WhiteRook48: what was 33...Qe5??
Sep-05-11  KokeFischer: A way to look for counterplay?!
or a simple blunder?
(36. Ng6+ was not so to easy predict)
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: 36.Ng6+! hxg6 37.Re3! wins the queen, leaving White with a winning material advantage.
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: I saw 36. Ng6+ hxg6 37. Re3 Qxe3+ 38. Qxe3+ right away.

I said to myself, "That's not resignable. There must be something better."

And I wasted five minutes trying to find it.

Mar-17-20  Cheapo by the Dozen: Not the best Tuesday puzzle, for <al wazir>'s reasons.
Mar-17-20  saturn2: I thought 36. Ng6+ hxg6 37. Re3 Kd8 (or Qxd3) 38. Rxe5 Rxe5 39 c4 is a win for white. The d pawn is very strong.
Mar-17-20  SpamIAm: Interesting that Euwe plays Alekhine's Defense, which was very new at the time, but Becker declines to play 2.e5 and all that that entails, preferring the relative simplicity of 2.Nc3. Euwe, for his part, could've tried to keep the hypermodern theme going with a move such as 2...d6, 2...e6, or even 2...Nc6?! but himself decides to go back to 'normal' with 2...e5.
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a knight and a pawn for a bishop.

Black threatens Qe1#.

White can win material with 36.Ng6+ hxg6 37.Re3 Qxe3+ 38.Qxe3+.

Mar-17-20  Walter Glattke: Black threatens Qe1#, therefore change RN against Q with 36.Ng6+ (and gardez) hxg6 37.Re3 not Kd8? 38.Rxe5 Rxe5 39.Qh8+ and QxR but 37.Re3 Qxe3 38.Qxe3+ with material win, agree to agb 2002, here more details only. Weaker are 36.d5 Kd8 or 36.Rg7+ Kd8
Mar-17-20  Walter Glattke: Of course 37.Re3 Kd8 38.Rxe5 Rxe5 (Qh8 Re8)
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: Hmmmm, the first 3 moves were easy enough but I struggled to find the other 18!
Mar-17-20  malt: White can pick up the Queen with
36.Ng6+ hg6 37.Re3
Mar-17-20  Brenin: 33...Qe5 looks like a blunder or a fingers-crossed attempt at counterplay, but the alternatives look miserable for Black. Realistically, Black was losing after 30...Qd6 allowed a K-side invasion.
Mar-17-20  morfishine: What <FSR> and <scormus> said, of course I didn't see til the end
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <al wazir: I saw 36. Ng6+ hxg6 37. Re3 Qxe3+ 38. Qxe3+ right away.

I said to myself, "That's not resignable. There must be something better.">

Perhaps the chessgames guidelines for puzzles of the day should be your starting point, instead of unreasonable expectations:

<<<The goal is to find the best move, or sequence of moves, in the given position.>>

You do not always have to find a checkmate! Just find the best move. >

Daily Puzzle F.A.Q.

Mar-17-20  moodini: Haha. I saw the alignment of the pieces and went for the amazing 36. Re3 ?!

I annotated it as a dubious move because maybe the opponent will not see the check either and resign.

Mar-17-20  Nullifidian: I must be missing something, because the only thing I can see to do here is the clearance sac 36. ♘g6+. It can't be refused because it forks the king and queen, and then 37. ♖e3 pins the queen and allows it to be picked up the next move, either by ♖xe5 or ♕xe3+ if the enemy queen captures the rook. White will then be up two points: a queen to a rook and bishop and with an extra pawn. But that seems like a very piddling advantage.
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: Not very conclusive, is it? Nonetheless it is a nice combination.

As happens (to me) so often, I did not get this on my first try. Had to look away for a few minutes and then return to it.

Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  erniecohen: A straightforward 36.♖g7 ♔d8 37.g3 also wins.
Mar-17-20  Walter Glattke: Evidence for stormus: finding the other 18, I had an option with 39.Qg3 Bxb5 (better Re5!? or not!?) 40.Qc7 Re7 41.Qd8 Kf7 42.Qh8 Re7 43.Kf3 Bc2!? 44.d6 Rd7 45.Qh7+ Kf6 46.Qxg6+ Ke5!? 47.g4 fxg4+ 48.Kxg4 Rxd6 49.Qg7+ Rf6 50.Kg5 Kd4 51.Qxf6+ Kxd3 but no clear other moves to find instead of the match moves.
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Green eg pg tips what?
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Mark Twain nah!
Mar-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Breunor: Exact same for me as Al Wazir but computer views as a bag advantage for white.
Mar-17-20  TheaN: The point why this Tuesday is a bit off is the rather simplicity of the combination: I glanced at the game line, but felt White was in a crushing position. However, Black's escape clause with Kd8-c8 can only be stopped by 36.Qh4+, but then Kd6 is playable. If White tries to go all in with 36.Rg7+ Kd8 37.Rxd7+?! he's on thin ice, as the position's strong but the rook's not worse than the knight. The gameline does simply win material.

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