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Hikaru Nakamura vs Magnus Carlsen
Magnus Carlsen Invitational (2020) (rapid), chess24.com INT, rd 2, May-03
Queen's Gambit Declined: Cambridge Springs Variation (D52)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
May-03-20  Ulhumbrus: The commentators with the computer evaluations suggested that it was a mistake for Nakamura to combine the move 41 Ne5 with the move 43 Kg2.

Nakamura had to play either play 41 Kg2 instead of 41 Ne5 or else, having played 41 Ne5, to delay 43 Kg2 and play instead 43 h4 before Black could advance his g pawn by 43...g5.

May-03-20  SirChrislov: 0.00 EqualStockfish 11 64 POPCNT | Cloud | Depth: 34 |

0.00 58. Kg1 g3 59. Rb7+ Kf8 60. a7 Ra1+ 61. Kg2 Ra2+ 62. Kf1 Ra1+ 63. Kg2

0.00 58. Kh1 Kd7 59. Rd6+ Ke7
0.00 58. Kf1 Kd7 59. Rd6+ Ke7

Final, game#4
end time wht0m53s, blk2m52s
Winner Carlsen 2½ : 1½ Nakamura

May-04-20  metatron2: <Ulhumbrus: The commentators with the computer evaluations suggested that it was a mistake for Nakamura to combine the move 41 Ne5 with the move 43 Kg2. Nakamura had to play either play 41 Kg2 instead of 41 Ne5 or else, having played 41 Ne5, to delay 43 Kg2 and play instead 43 h4 before Black could advance his g pawn by 43...g5>
 

After 41. Kg2 black can force things with Ra3, and now if white plays 42. Ne5, it is not such a improvement compared to the game, since with the R on a3 black will later play g5 (with h6 first if white plays h4), and then white has a problem to bring his K up to the 3rd rank due the e3 pin that allows black f4, and further ruin of white's pawn structure after taking on e3.

If white will try to keep his N with say Ne1, then black's B will get activity against white's king side pawns that are all on black squares.

As for 43. h4, it does seem much better than Naka's 43. Kg2, which allowed the immediate 43 .. g5 and black took advantage of white's broken pawn structure, in order to build a pawn phalanx that could easily draw.

However, after 43. h4 black has h6+g5, which looks similar to the game, other than the option that white has to play h4-h5 after black's g5 (I think that Svidler mentioned that). It does seem to give white some chances to transpose to endgames when white gives his a+e pawns in return for black's e and h pawns, and that can win depending on the positions of the white and black kings.

But that is quite a delicate nuance to see in time trouble, especially after Carlsen himself played 42.. Kd7 and instead of the immediate 42..g5, so Nakamura intuitively replied with a quick K move of his own.

So all in all, I think that this endgame is very difficult to win. Black has much more chances to draw this endgame due to the bad pawn structure white has on his K side. And to win this endgame while being short of time against Carlsen is almost impossible, since it is easier to defend that position than playing it for a win.

So a well deserved draw for Carlsen here, that gave him a well deserved match and tournament win.

May-04-20  JustAnotherMaster: Thx for the tournament MC...great coverage and Grischuk even looked so clean I couldn't believe it was him on the final day. Miss staying safe and watching this every morning.
May-05-20  Ulhumbrus: <metatron2: <Ulhumbrus: The commentators with the computer evaluations suggested that it was a mistake for Nakamura to combine the move 41 Ne5 with the move 43 Kg2. Nakamura had to play either play 41 Kg2 instead of 41 Ne5 or else, having played 41 Ne5, to delay 43 Kg2 and play instead 43 h4 before Black could advance his g pawn by 43...g5>

After 41. Kg2 black can force things with Ra3, and now if white plays 42. Ne5, it is not such a improvement compared to the game, since with the R on a3 black will later play g5 (with h6 first if white plays h4), and then white has a problem to bring his K up to the 3rd rank due the e3 pin that allows black f4, and further ruin of white's pawn structure after taking on e3.

If white will try to keep his N with say Ne1, then black's B will get activity against white's king side pawns that are all on black squares.

As for 43. h4, it does seem much better than Naka's 43. Kg2, which allowed the immediate 43 .. g5 and black took advantage of white's broken pawn structure, in order to build a pawn phalanx that could easily draw.

However, after 43. h4 black has h6+g5, which looks similar to the game, other than the option that white has to play h4-h5 after black's g5 (I think that Svidler mentioned that). It does seem to give white some chances to transpose to endgames when white gives his a+e pawns in return for black's e and h pawns, and that can win depending on the positions of the white and black kings.

But that is quite a delicate nuance to see in time trouble, especially after Carlsen himself played 42.. Kd7 and instead of the immediate 42..g5, so Nakamura intuitively replied with a quick K move of his own.

So all in all, I think that this endgame is very difficult to win. Black has much more chances to draw this endgame due to the bad pawn structure white has on his K side. And to win this endgame while being short of time against Carlsen is almost impossible, since it is easier to defend that position than playing it for a win.

So a well deserved draw for Carlsen here, that gave him a well deserved match and tournament win.>

After 41 Kg2 Ra3 one alternative to 42 Ne5 is 42 Nb2 and on 42...Ra2 43 Nc4.

Otherwise an alternative to both 41 Ne4 and 41 Kg2 is 42 h4 once again hindering the advance ...g5.

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