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Sergey Karjakin vs Boris Gelfand
Tal Memorial (2010), Moscow RUS, rd 1, Nov-05
Russian Game: Nimzowitsch Attack (C42)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: This is a really instructive ending. I had assumed, at first, that it was an easy draw after 49..Kc4 winning the c-pawn but I don't see a defense to White's plan of bringing the king to b7. The finesse 52 Bd4+ and 53 Bf6 is clever but I think it might be win even without that.
Nov-05-10  goodevans: 48 ... Kc4 would have made it harder for white.

I don't think 49 a7 Bxa7 50 Bxa7 would win because black's b-pawn holds up white's last pawn.

49 Bc7 might be better.

Nov-05-10  ILikeChicks: 47.c3 looks winning as well.Black's 43rd move was a horrible mistake.
Nov-05-10  Marmot PFL: 44...Ba5 was black's chance
Nov-05-10  Calli: Looks like he had to play 44...Ba5 which stops a5, a6. After 45.Bb6! it's all over. Instructive..
Nov-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <goodevans> <48 ... Kc4 would have made it harder for white.

I don't think 49 a7 Bxa7 50 Bxa7 would win because black's b-pawn holds up white's last pawn.

49 Bc7 might be better.>

You hit the nail right on the head.

After 48...Kc4 49 a7 Bxa7 50 Bxa7 Kxb5, the position is a tablebase draw.


click for larger view

However, after 48...Kc4 49 Bc7! Kxb5 50 Bxb8 bxa6, the position is a table base win.


click for larger view

Overall, I believe the difference in the two positions is that in the winning one, white's remaining pawn is passed and black's promotion square for his pawn is the same color as the white bishop.

And, with the bishop able to post up on e5, black's king can't get to the b3, c3 and d3 squares. This gives white's king time to take black's h pawn and then move back to escort his own pawn to promotion.

Nov-05-10  Eyal: <Jimfromprovidence: After 48...Kc4 49 a7 Bxa7 50 Bxa7 Kxb5, the position is a tablebase draw. However, after 48...Kc4 49 Bc7! Kxb5 50 Bxb8 bxa6, the position is a table base win. Overall, I believe the difference in the two positions is that in the winning one, white's remaining pawn is passed and black's promotion square for his pawn is the same color as the white bishop.>

Interestingly, after 48...Kc4 49 Bc7! Kxb5 50 Bxb8 <Kxa6>:


click for larger view

White is also winning, even though the pawn structure is identical to the one reached by the drawing line 48...Kc4 49 a7? Bxa7 50 Bxa7 Kxb5:


click for larger view

The difference being that since the black king is more backward in the first position, White has time for the maneuver c3-Bd6-Bb4, safeguarding his remaining pawn and blocking a possible advance of Black's b-pawn to b4, in order to exchange it.

Nov-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <Eyal> <Interestingly, after 48...Kc4 49 Bc7! Kxb5 50 Bxb8 <Kxa6> White is also winning...>

So you end up with something like this in your analysis.


click for larger view

Black can't force a pawn exchange and he loses his h pawn and the game as well, in a slow, tortuous manner.

That's amazing work <Eyal>. That means what I said earlier, below, is a bunch of crap.

“Overall, I believe the difference in the two positions is that in the winning one, white's remaining pawn is passed and black's promotion square for his pawn is the same color as the white bishop.”

Nov-05-10  Eyal: <Jim> Don't be too hard on yourself... in the line with <50...bxa6> the factors that you mentioned with regard to the pawns are indeed significant - I only wanted to point out that in a "slightly" different line, it's a different factor altogether (the position of Black's king) that enters into play and decides the game in favor of White. Just goes to show how devilishly tricky chess can be.
Nov-05-10  James Bowman: Very nice job by Karjakin, starts by weakening the king side and building an attack then quickly switches the game towards an endgame when Gelfand answers. Impressive job of schooling his elder bringing his pawn home. I had sorta relegated him to lurking in the shadows of the chess elite, glad I was wrong.
Nov-06-10  ILikeChicks: Looks like 43..cxb5 was not a losing mistake after all! Karjakin explains on http://video.russiachess.org Also, there you can find Aronian commenting his game vs Kramnik.
Nov-06-10  Eyal: ...Apparently the losing move isn't <44...Ke4> after all, even though it does give White winning chances that 44....Ba5 wouldn't. It's rather <47...Bb8??>

Position after 47.Kg2:


click for larger view

<After 47...Be5! White cannot win. 48.a6 bxa6 49.bxa6 Kc6 Black's key defense lies in the fact that white's bishop is the wrong color and does not control the a-pawn's promotion square. Ex: 50.a7 [with the bishop not on b8 this move doesn't gain a crucial tempo] Kb7 51.c4 Ka8 52.Kh3 [52.c5 Bd4!] Bg7 53.Kg4 Be5 54.Kh5 Bf4=> (http://www.chessbase.com/news/2010/...)

Nov-06-10  Kazzak: Here's the direct link to Karjakin's comments:
http://video.russiachess.org/browse...
Nov-06-10  Rogalentis: Dosen't 57...Bxb6 58.Kxb6 h4 59.a7 h3 60.a8=Q h2 ends with a draw?
Nov-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: <Rogalentis: Dosen't 57...Bxb6 58.Kxb6 h4 59.a7 h3 60.a8=Q h2 ends with a draw?> 61.Qh1+ Kf2 62.Qxh2+ wins for White.
Nov-06-10  shakespeare: Easy to win endgame if you know centurinis position - here even without dealing with the opponents king
Nov-06-10  splatty: Great endgame win for Karjak. Pretty awful game for Gelfand.
Nov-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I was wondering if this ending was necessarily a win. Interesting game.
Nov-15-10  LIFE Master AJ: Big time technique by Karjakin.
Nov-22-10  checkmateyourmove: wins over kramnik and gelfy with petrov, i would stay clear away from petrov against sergey for a while if i was a gm.
Oct-23-13  king 618: Nice Bishop ending by GM Sergey Karjakin!!

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