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Evgeny Bareev vs Peter Svidler
Russian Championship Superfinal (2005), Moscow RUS, rd 9, Dec-28
Gruenfeld Defense: Russian. Prins Variation (D97)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Dec-28-05  syracrophy: 37...Rxd6 38.Rxd6 and the threat is 39.Nc6! winning
Dec-28-05  Timothy Glenn Forney: The power of a passed pawn ,control of the center and space, are the themes of this fantastic game by Bareev. I like his strategy ,making his opponent tie up all his pieces around the passed pawn.
Dec-28-05  csmath: <The power of a passed pawn ,control of the center and space, are the themes of this fantastic game by Bareev. I like his strategy ,making his opponent tie up all his pieces around the passed pawn.>

Timothy, I think Bareev strategy here is fairly standard though of course he is executing it quite convincingly.

However there are few things about this game that are not as impressive as it might look at first:

(a) Svidler has chosen rather compromised line for whatever reasons. They claim he is an expert on Grunfeld but here he did not play that way.

(b) prior to Svidler's 31. ... Qd8? Bareev has not really accomplished convincing advantage and even though black has been rather bound around that pawn it is hard to see any particular impressive plan of Bareev else than shuffling queen around.

(c) the decisive moment in the game was 31. ... Qd8 which is a grave positional error by Svidler, it is hard to see any particular reason why he has played this awful move that costed him a game.

Bareev in this tournament has presented himself as a punisher of serious errors by other players. He punished serious positional errors by Svidler and Morozevich, and a serious tactical oversight by Kramnik.

Dec-28-05  setebos: I fully agree csmath. Occasionally Svidler plays poorly. This game reminds me of a game he lost to Piket in an ICC tourney some years ago when he got clobbered in a Grunfeld.
Dec-28-05  jhoro: <csmath> you say that 31... Qd8 was the bad move, but it seems if Svidler had played 32... Re7 he would've eliminated the pesky pawn (so 32... Ne7? appears to be more of a mistake). and ya, i used a computer for this where your analyses always seem to be done withouth machine assistance, but i'm just to lousy to do it on my own ;-)
Dec-28-05  yogi1986: i don't think you should take kramnik, morozevich, and svidler's openings too seriously here. They have far more important tournaments with far tougher competition coming up quite soon. corus, m-tel and the candidates etc.
Dec-28-05  csmath: <you say that 31... Qd8 was the bad move, but it seems if Svidler had played 32... Re7 he would've eliminated the pesky pawn (so 32... Ne7? appears to be more of a mistake). and ya, i used a computer for this where your analyses always seem to be done withouth machine assistance, but i'm just to lousy to do it on my own ;-)>

I always use computer for analyses, in fact multiple engines. 32. ... Qd8? is a decisive positional error (in a cheerless position) for many reasons:

1. It ties down the queen on the eight rank.

2. It cuts off b7 rook from 7th rank and coordination with queen.

3. It opens up d6 for the rook invasion.

It is simply a terrible move. Svidler had an option to continue to shuffle b7-b8 rook and Bareev would have to find some other plan (say h4-h5 etc) to break in.

But you are correct in noticing that Ne7 isn't the smartest move either. I think that after 32. ... Qd8 the position is already lost for black and that Bareev would find the way through without much effort.

Dec-28-05  csmath: <i don't think you should take kramnik, morozevich, and svidler's openings too seriously here. They have far more important tournaments with far tougher competition coming up quite soon. corus, m-tel and the candidates etc.>

I take their play here very seriously. If Kasparov could play with full force of his talent last year then so do these guys who are lesser players than he is.

Dec-28-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  AgentRgent: <jhoro: where your analyses always seem to be done withouth machine assistance> Surely you're joking!?
Dec-28-05  Timothy Glenn Forney: (it is hard to see any particular impressive plan of Bareev else than shuffling queen around.)csmath- He is hardly shuffling,every move of the queen had a purpose,controling the a1-h8 diagonal or protecting his only advantage the passed pawn.
Dec-29-05  hitman84: brilliant refuting of Nb4 by bareev if u observe svidler lost due to the many tempos he gave with his N moves.
Dec-29-05  hitman84: 17...Qd7 seems to be dubious instead he could have played a5!? idea a4 its very important for black to create counterplay on the Q-side,after Qd7 the Q just dies taking the place of what could have been a potential square for N,brilliant play by Bareev.
Dec-29-05  alicefujimori: Bareev actually played a novelty by the way. 15.Rd2 was the novelty and if anyone cares to look at similiar games in the chessgames.com database, you'll see what was the purpose of this move.

So it's not suprising that Svidler was obviously suprised by Bareev's novelty, and I don't think he reacted in the best possible way.

An interesting alternative to look at is 15...Re8, keeping the maximium amount of flexibility in the position and see what White does before commiting the bishop on c8. Now:

1) 16.Rad1 Ba6 17.Nb5 (17.Qb3? Bxc3 18.bxc3 Bxe2 19.cxb4 Bxd1 20.Rxd1 Qd6 21.bxc5 bxc5 and Black's definitely better.) 17...Qd7 18.a4 (18.Bf1 Nxa2) 18...Bb7 with counterplay against the d-pawn

2) 16.a3 (I suspect this was what Bareev would play against 15...Re8) An example variation runs 16...Ba6 17.Nb5 Rxe2 18.Rxe2 Nxd5 19.Rad1 Qd7 20.Rxd5 Qxb5 21.Qxb5 Bxb5 Although black has only a pawn for the exchange, the fact that he still has the bishop pair + got rid of the dangerous d-pawn, he shouldn't complain too much.

Anyway. The variations above at least wouldn't made Black tied up like in the actual game. I wonder if Svidler had consider this option.

Dec-29-05  twinlark: <alicefujimori>

Interesting analysis. I got a vague impression during the game that 15. Qc4 was a subtle trap by Bareev designed to elicit 15...Ba6 and the exchange of Bishops. A deep and evil plot be Bareev to trick Svidller into parting with a piece that would have (in restrospect) been important in blockading d7. It's absence crippled Black's options and failed to relieve any congestion in Black's position. Perhaps not fatally, but it provided more scope for Black to err.

Psychology plays an important role in chess, as it does in other sports.

Incidentally, ChessBase informs us today of 16...Qd7 (instead of 16...Bxe2) 17.Bxa6 Nxa6 18.Re1 Rfe8 19.Rde2 Rxe2 20.Rxe2 Nc7 21.Ne5 Bxe5 22.Rxe5 Re8 23.f4 Kg7 24.h3 f6 25.Rxe8 Nxe8 26.Qb5 Qe7 27.Kf2 Nd6 [and now the Black Knight is blockading the passed pawn] 28.Qd3 ½-½ Lputian,S (2585)-Kalantarian,N (2495)/Yerevan 1995. (This game is not in the ChessGames database. <Chessgames.com>: perhaps now it should be?)

Dec-29-05  alicefujimori: <twinlark>Thanks for the update. This is all very interesting.
Dec-29-05  sucaba: <alicefujimori>, 15. _ ♖e8, which implies an exchange sacrifice, is interesting. On 16. a3 ♗a6 17. ♘b5 ♖xe2 18. ♖xe2 ♘xd5 19. ♖ad1 ♕d7, 20. a4 could be an improvement for White, for example 20. _ ♖d8 21. ♖ed2 ♗b7 22. ♘xa7 .
Dec-29-05  alicefujimori: <sucaba>After 20.a4 Black has 20...Qg4! when 21.Rxd5 can be met with 21...Qxa4 winning back the piece.
Dec-29-05  sucaba: <alicefujimori>, I had noticed this move 20. _ ♕g4 too, but only after 15. ♖e8 16. a3 ♗a6 17. ♘b5 ♖xe2 18. ♕xe2 ♘xd5 19. ♖ad1 ♕d7 20. a4.

In the line with instead 18. ♖xe2, the move 20. _ ♕g4 fails to 21. ♕xg4 !?

Dec-29-05  alicefujimori: <sucaba>Sorry, I didn't see that it was 18.Rxe2 instead of 18.Qxe2. But after your 18.Rxe2, Black has the straightforward 18...Qxd5 instead of 18...Nxd5 that you have suggested.
Dec-29-05  hitman84: <alicefujimori> very interesting analysis yes swidler was caught offguard by Rd2 <twinlark>thx for the instructive game.
Dec-30-05  setebos: Was 22..bxc3 forced? Why did Svidler part with his strong bishop so lightly?
Dec-30-05  Timothy Glenn Forney: It was a zwischenzug,instead of moving his N to safety.He didn't want whites N on e4 with Nxf6 on the next move.
Jan-01-06  csmath: <I think Bareev missed a strong move: 22. Nd5! after which black can play: 22... Bd8 23. h4 Ra7 24. h5 b5 25. Qc2 g5 26. Re2 Rxe2 27. Qxe2

22... Qxd6! 23. Nc7 Qxc7 24. Rd7 Re6 25. Rxc7 Nxc7 26. Qf4 Nb5 27. Qxh6>

So what if black simply takes the knight?

As in 22. ... Nxd5.

Jan-02-06  Hesam7: <csmath> Sorry I made a mistake. IMO 22. Nb5 was white's strong move:


click for larger view

22... Rad8 23. Nc7 Ref8 24. b3 Nc6 25. Qb5 Nd4 26. Nxd4 cxd4 27. Qxb6 Qxd6 28. Qxd6 Rxd6 29. Nb5 Rd5 30. Nxd4 Re8 31. Nf3 Rxd2 32. Rxd2 Kg7

Jan-22-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: Looking at opening explorer, it would appear that 11. ....Nb4 is a poor choice -- black has no wins and mainl losses. 11... Bg4 yields better results. BTW, an analysis by Robert Byrne in the NY Times today says that whites game was already won by 31. Qa2 so 32. Qd8 is no great disaster.
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