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Geza Maroczy vs Hermann von Gottschall
Barmen Meisterturnier A (1905), Barmen GER, rd 15, Aug-30
French Defense: Classical. Alapin Variation (C14)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  nasmichael: This is my first time looking at the ending explorer, and I can see it as a valuable tool. The wrestling that took place in this longer game must have been an interesting struggle as it took place. Anyone have information that would tell me about the details of the game or the tourney in which the game took place?
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: <Nasmichael> Barmen is a city in the North Rhine-Westphalia region of Germany. The tournament took place in August-September 1905, and celebrated forty years of the Barmen chess club. There were five tournaments, and a chess waltz was specially composed.

The top two tournaments were a grandmaster and a master tournament (A and B). There were three "Hauptturniers" (Majors).

In the grandmaster section David Janowski and Geza Maroczy came joint first. Many of the competeitors had just come from the Ostende tournament three weeks earlier. This shows the stamina required of professionals in the early twentieth century - dealing with steam trains rather than preparing on computers, and usually having to play in what big tournaments (1,500 marks first prize) were available as they were relatively sparse.

Mikhail Chigorin showed the sings of his decline, as he had done in his Ostende performance.

The B tournament was won by the dual named Leo Fleischmann Forgacs, with Aron Nimzowitsch sharing 15-16th (which made him completely reassess his chess and start analyzing games with a ferocious appetite).

The lesser tournaments were still very strong.
In the "Hauptturniers"

A: was won by Akiba Rubinstein and Oldrich Duras

B: Was won after a tie breaker by Savielly Tartakower - Of his first major tournament he wrote: "I considered my task as a mere promonade...only to be overhauled at the very end by...George Shories". They played a match for the title of master which Tartakower won; having refused to "buy" the title from his opponent. Shories was confident; he had achieved reasonable results in minor tournaments in England (3-5th Folkstone, 1901; 6th Tunbridge Wells, 1902; 1st Canterbury, 1903)

C: Was won by Jeno Szekely

Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: Duras and Rubinstein also played a match for the master title. Rubinstein had to leave while the match was tied 1:1. Organizers then made an exception and awarded the master title to both.
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Mikhail Chigorin showed the sings of his decline, as he had done in his Ostende performance.> I seem to remember reading that Chigorin was already very ill with cancer.
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <B: Was won after a tie breaker by Savielly Tartakower - Of his first major tournament he wrote: "I considered my task as a mere promonade...only to be overhauled at the very end by...George Shories". They played a match for the title of master which Tartakower won; ...> Hmm, could you check that again? I just read that Shories won the title match.
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: <Gypsy> I have re-checked and I was wrong. Shories won the match.
Jun-19-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: Thanks <Chessical>.
Jun-20-04  vonKrolock: bravissimo, <Chessical> and <Gypsy> - the only fact that i can add is that the game Schlechter-John in Barmen 1905 is a classic
Jul-03-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: This game was played in the 15th and final round. Coming in, Maroczy and Janowski were tied for first, with Marshall and Schlechter a half-point behind. To make matters more interesting, Janowski was playing Black against Schlechter. However, Janowski contrived to win his game, so Maroczy HAD to win this one--and finally found a way to do so.

This capped a great comeback by Maroczy, who scored 6½ points in his last seven games.

By the way, besides Schlechter vs W John, 1905, there were two other great games in this tournament which resembled it somewhat: Maroczy vs H Suechting, 1905 and Janowski vs Alapin, 1905.

Jul-28-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Tremendous effort by Maroczy in the ending to penetrate Black's defenses. Frankly, much of his maneuvering looks like an attempt to lull Black to sleep (perhaps literally!), but after the a-pawns leave the board the White King finally has the wherewithal to invade the dark squares.
Jun-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: <Phony Benoni> However, Janowski contrived to win his game, so Maroczy HAD to win this one--and finally found a way to do so.

<Phony Benoni>
This probably explains why after patient maneuvring Maroczy decided to play 83. ♗xe6, getting three pawns for the piece, and and ending which von Gottschall can't defend.

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