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  1. "Richard Réti's Best Games" by Golombek
    Richard Réti's Best Games by Golombek
    Compiled by suenteus po 147

    The games and compositions collected here are from Harry Golombek's book "Richard Réti's Best Games." Since the compositions could not be included in order with the games below they follow this tournament introduction:

    Compositions:

    Endgame Study p.80
    Kagan's Neueste Schachnachrichten, 1921


    click for larger view

    ----------White to play and draw----------

    Endgame Study p.100
    Teplitz-Schonauer Anzeiger, 1922


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.101
    Kagan's Neueste Schachnachrichten, 1922


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.101
    Hastings and St. Leonards Post, 1922


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.130
    Berliner Tageblatt, 1923


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.130
    Casopis ceskoslovenskych sachistu, 1924


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.152
    Wiener Tageblatt, 1925


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.152
    28 Rijen, 1925


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.173
    Shakhmatny Listok, 1927


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.173
    Shakhmatny Listok, 1927


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    ----------White to play and draw----------

    Endgame Study p.196
    Magyar Sakkvilág, 1928


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    ----------White to play and draw----------

    Endgame Study p.197
    Narodni Listy, 1928


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    ----------White to play and draw----------

    Endgame Study p.197
    Denken und Raten, 1928


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.197
    Shakhmaty, 1928


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.198
    Koelnische Volkszeitung, 1928 [Reti & H. Rinck (1935)]


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.198
    Munchner Neuiste Nachrichten, 1928


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.198
    Shakhmaty, 1929


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.199
    Magyar Sakkvilág, 1929


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.199
    Basler Nachrichten, 1929


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    ----------White to play and win----------

    Endgame Study p.199
    Ostrauer Morgenzeitung, 04.1929


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    ----------White to play and draw----------

    “Reading can take you places you have never been before.” – Dr. Seuss

    Endgame Principles – Part 1

    1. The great mobility of the King forms one of the chief characteristics of all endgame strategy. In the middle game the King is a mere ‘super’, in the endgame on the other hand – on of the ‘principals’. We must therefore develop him; bring him nearer to the fighting line. – Aaron Nimzowitsch

    2. The king, which during the opening and middle game stage is often a burden because it has to be defended, becomes in the endgame a very important and aggressive piece, and the beginner should realize this, and utilize his king as much as possible. – Jose Capablanca

    3. A player can sometimes afford the luxury of an inaccurate move, or even a definite error, in the opening or middle game without necessarily obtaining a lost position. In the endgame … an error can be decisive, and we are rarely presented with a second chance. – Paul Keres

    4. Endings of one rook and pawns are about the most common sort of endings arising on the chess board. Yet, though they do occur so often, few have mastered them thoroughly. They are often of a very difficult nature, and sometimes while apparently very simple they are in reality extremely intricate. – Jose Capablanca

    5. Ninety percent of the book variations have no great value. That is because either they contain mistakes or they are based on fallacious assumptions. So, just forget about the openings. And, spend all that time on the endings. – Jose Capablanca

    6. It is a well-known phenomenon that the same amateur who can conduct the middle game quite creditably, is usually perfectly helpless in the end game. One of the principal requisites of good chess is the ability to treat both the middle and end game equally well. – Aaron Nimzowitsch

    Endgame Principles – Part 2
    7. If you are weak in the endgame, you must spend more time analyzing studies. In your training games, you must aim at transposing to endgames which will help you to acquire the requisite experience. – Mikhail Botvinnik

    8. If you are weak in the endgame, you must spend more time analyzing studies; in your training games you must aim at transposing to endgames. That will help you acquire the requisite experience. – Mikhail Botvinnik

    9. When I was preparing for one term’s work in the Botvinnik School I had to spend a lot of time on king and pawn endings. So when I came to a tricky position in my own games I knew the winning method. – Garry Kasparov

    10. The business of the endgame is maneuvering to control critical squares, advancing or blockading passed pawns, preparing a breakthrough by the king, or exploiting the subtle superiority of one piece over another. – Pal Benko

    11. In a rook and pawn ending, the rook must be used aggressively. It must either attack enemy pawns, or give active support to the advance of one of its own pawns to the queening square. – Siegbert Tarrasch

    12. You will already have noticed how often Capablanca repeated moves, often returning to positions which he had had before. This is not lack of decisiveness or slowness, but the employment of a basic endgame principle which is ‘Do not hurry’. – Alexander Kotov

    13. If you study the classic examples of endgame play you will see how the king was brought up as soon as possible even though there seemed no particular hurry at the time. – Alexander Kotov

    “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” ― George R.R. Martin

    If you're American when you go in the bathroom… … and American when you come out, what are you in the bathroom?

    European.


    92 games, 1907-2015

  2. # Chess Evolution Volumes 51-100
    Cloned from Qindarka

    'Chess Evolution Weekly Newsletter' by Arkadij Naiditsch and Csaba Balogh.

    Best games of Volumes 51-100.

    Q: What did the fish say when he swam into a wall? A: Dam.


    183 games, 2013-2014

  3. # Chess Informant Best Games 801-900
    by Qindarka

    'Chess Informant'.

    Best games of Volumes 81-90.

    98 games, 2001-2004

  4. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 19
    (500 games) 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 19 Compiled by 0ZeR0

    Nuremburg 1896: Nuremberg (1896)

    20th Century Games: Game Collection: Las Mil y Una Partidas (1001 Chess Games)

    Battles Royal: Game Collection: Battles Royal of the Chessboard by R.N. Coles

    Historical: Game Collection: Guinness Book - Chess Grandmasters (Hartston)

    Alpha Scandi: Game Collection: Alpha Scandinavian (White)

    Evolution: Game Collection: # Chess Evolution Volumes 51-100

    * Play Stockfish 1-10: https://labinatorsolutions.github.i...

    POTD 2019: Game Collection: Puzzle of the Day 2019

    “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” ― Anna Quindlen

    “Nothing is dearer to a chess player's heart than his rating. Well, of course everyone knows he's under-rated, but his rating, its ups and downs, however miniscule, are his ego's stock-market report.” ― Lev Alburt

    “The ideas which now pass for brilliant innovations and advances are in fact mere revivals of ancient errors, and a further proof of the dictum that those who are ignorant of the past are condemned to repeat it.” ― Henry Hazlitt

    The talking dog
    A guy spots a sign outside a house that reads “Talking Dog for Sale.” Intrigued, he walks in.

    “So what have you done with your life?” he asks the dog.

    “I’ve led a very full life,” says the dog. “I lived in the Alps rescuing avalanche victims. Then I served my country in Iraq. And now I spend my days reading to the residents of a retirement home.”

    The guy is flabbergasted. He asks the dog’s owner, “Why on earth would you want to get rid of an incredible dog like that?”

    The owner says, “Because he’s a liar! He never did any of that!”

    — Submitted by Harry Nelson

    .

    500 games, 1788-2022

  5. 1 Barry Attack
    8 games, 1889-2023

  6. 1 Defensa Philidor, ese campo de minas
    Hay que andar con pies de plomo al jugar esta apertura con negras. Sobre todo con el alfil de rey, que parece que le hayan echado un mal de ojo.
    20 games, 1750-2008

  7. 1 Fun With the London & Colle Systems
    35 games, 1914-2023

  8. 1 Grand Prix Attack. Schofman Variation (f5) (B
    early f5, black fianchetto king side-g7,
    22 games, 1972-2017

  9. 1 Isolated Pawn
    18 games, 1966-2009

  10. 1 QID
    A study of the Queen's Indian Defense

    Here is what Vladimir Kramnik has to say:
    "Botvinnik’s example and teaching established the modern approach to preparing for competitive chess: regular but moderate physical exercise; analysing very thoroughly a relatively narrow repertoire of openings; annotating one’s own games, those of past great players and those of competitors; publishing one’s annotations so that others can point out any errors; studying strong opponents to discover their strengths and weaknesses; ruthless objectivity about one’s own strengths and weaknesses."

    “Reading can take you places you have never been before.” — Dr. Seuss

    Q: What do you call a fish with no eyes?
    A: A fsh.

    (to the tune of "Did I Remember," hit song from 1936) by beatgiant

    Did I remember to tell you I play chess,
    and I am livin' to kibitz alone?
    Did I remember to say I'm here all day,
    and just how carried away with GMs' play?
    Chess was on my screen and that was all I knew,
    Posting a mate in 2, what did I say to you?
    Did I remember to tell you I play chess,
    And pray forever more the site's online?

    “I went frantically mad with chess. I bought a chess-board. I bought Il Calabrese. I shut myself up in my room and spent days and nights there with a will to learn all the games by heart, to cram them into my head willy-nilly, to play alone without end or remission. After two or three months working in that fine way, and after unimaginable endeavours, I went to the Cafe with a lean and sallow face, and nearly stupid. I made a trial, playing with Monsieur Bagueret again. He beat me once, twice, twenty times.” — Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Canine concerns
    A poodle and a collie are walking together when the poodle suddenly unloads on his friend. “My life is a mess,” he says. “My owner is mean, my girlfriend ran away with a schnauzer and I’m as jittery as a cat.”

    “Why don’t you go see a psychiatrist?” suggests the collie.

    “I can’t,” says the poodle. “I’m not allowed on the couch.”

    — Submitted by L.B. Weinstein


    10 games, 1984-2023

  11. 1. e4 Gambits [White]
    The Human Side of Chess by Fred Reinfeld

    A Biographical Work on the World Champions
    Reviewed in the United States on December 27, 2013 Since this is a lengthy review, I've divided it up into various topics. Please pick and choose those topics that are of interest to you. If you want a quick review of this book, then the fourth paragraph, "Reinfeld's coverage of the World Champions," should, hopefully, suffice.

    WHO WAS FRED REINFELD? Fred Reinfeld (January 27, 1910 - May 29, 1964) was considered one of the world's most prolific chess writers. In 1950, Reinfeld was ranked as the sixth strongest chess player in the United States. (See the article on Fred Reinfeld in the Wikipedia encyclopedia for more information.)

    A COMPARISON OF THE 1952 AND 1960 EDITIONS OF THIS BOOK. The "Human Side of Chess" was published in 1952 (302 pp.). It covers the World Champions from Adolf Anderssen to Max Euwe. There is a short chapter (5 pages), "After Alekhine," that briefly covers the period from Alekhine's death in 1946 to 1951 (Botvinnik's match with David Bronstein). A revised edition of this book appeared in 1960 under the title "The Great Chess Masters and Their Games" (334 pp.). Chapter IX, "After Alekhine," was shortened to four pages and a new chapter, "Mikhail Botvinnik and Vassily Smyslov" (23 pp.), was added. Four games (2 by Botvinnik and 2 by Smyslov) were added to the Game section at the end of the book (66 pp. in the 1st edition; 92 pages in the revised edition). Unfortunately, the publisher decided to delete the "Tournament and Match Records" (10 pages) and the Index (6 pages) from the revised edition. When I read this book as a teenager in 1957, I was fascinated by the tournament and match records of the various World Champions. I was sorely disappointed when this section was left out of the revised edition in 1960.

    REINFELD'S COVERAGE OF THE WORLD CHAMPIONS. Reinfeld devotes approximately 30 pages to each world champion. Unlike Reuben Fine's "Psychoanalytic Observations on Chess and Chess Masters" or John S. Hilbert's "Shady Side: The Life and Crimes of Norman Tweed Whitaker, Chessmaster," this book is neither a psychological study nor does it consist of intimate and detailed biographical commentary, i.e., I wouldn't call it a scholarly work. Yes, there are psychological insights and, yes, there are some personal details, but Reinfeld is mostly interested in the world champions as chess players first and foremost. We are not going to learn those intimate details that so often add spice to a biographical work. One also notices that Reinfeld is not reluctant to draw conclusions from what appears to be flimsy evidence. For example, he notes that Anderssen "was brusque at times, still suffering from the conflict between pride and embarrassment over money troubles and his humble origins." Can this be substantiated? Or is this simply a conjecture on Reinfeld's part? It should also be pointed out that Arnold Denker and Larry Parr, in their book, "The Bobby Fischer I Knew and Other Stories," warn us not to "read Fred's chess books for precision history." Although I did not note any factual errors in this book that is not to say that such errors don't exist. "My purpose," according to Reinfeld, "is not to criticize and not to apologize; only to understand." In my opinion, he more than succeeds. After reading this book, you will indeed have a greater understanding of these world champions.]

    WHY DOES REINFELD BEGIN HIS BOOK WITH ADOLF ANDERSSEN? According to FIDE (the World Chess Organization), Wilhelm Steinitz was the first World Champion. Fred Reinfeld disagreed! He begins the reign of the World Champions with Adolf Anderssen of Germany (Anderssen was born July 6, 1818 in Breslau). Why does Reinfeld begin with Anderssen and not Steinitz? The answer is very simple, Anderssen won the first international chess tournament, London 1851. Howard Staunton wrote a wonderful book on this tournament. The title of the book is "The Chess Tournament" (377 pp. + 83 page introduction; published in 1852). It is interesting to note Staunton's comment from page lxxiv of his introduction, "...[it] will be ever memorable in the annals of Chess, as the first general meeting of players from different parts of the world...." Seven years later, Anderssen was defeated in a match (7 losses, 2 wins, and 2 draws) against the American Paul Morphy. Morphy retired from chess shortly after this match. Anderssen then played a match with Wilhelm Steinitz in 1866 (Steinitz won the match by 8 wins, 6 losses, and 0 draws), so, according to this scenario, Steinitz was the third not the first World Champion.

    When Alekhine died on March 24, 1946, the World Championship was decided by a tournament of the world's best players in 1948 (this tournament was won by Botvinnik). Reinfeld indirectly implies that the London Tournament of 1851, the first international tournament in which the world's best players participated, was the equivalent of the 1948 tournament.* If one accepts this line of reasoning, then Anderssen was the first World Champion. Since Steinitz's match with Zukertort in 1886 was for the "Championship of the World," then, according to the official version, Steinitz should be considered the first World Champion. In short, the title of World Champion did not exist prior to the 1886 match. Personally, I find Reinfeld's argument most persuasive. By adding Anderseen and Morphy to our pantheon of World Champions, I feel that we have enriched our chess heritage.**

    A JUSTIFICATION FOR READING A BOOK ON THE WORLD CHAMPIONS. The reader might ask: Why read a book about the World Champions? The simple answer might be that their accomplishments are a source of inspiration and motivation for the rest of us, but I think that Veselin Topalov said it best: "From about the time of Anderssen and Morphy (mid-19th century) on, the champions were acknowledged as geniuses, and their best games had the status of works of art." ("Topalov-Kramnik, 2006 World Chess Championship, On the Edge in Elista," by Veselin Topalov & Zhivko Ginchev, p. 7.) Hopefully, the reader of this review will get as much enjoyment out of Reinfeld's book as I have.

    A BRIEF NOTE ON REINFELD'S INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER. Although Reinfeld included a games section (pages 221 - 286), this book is primarily a biographical work. The first chapter (pages 3 - 8) has the intriguing title "The Illusion of Master Chess." "Chess becomes an art," according to Reinfeld, "when a player reaches the stage at which he is able to conceive a winning position and possesses the ability to bring the conceived position into existence. Such a player is called a master--a chessmaster. The great chessmasters, like the great poets, the great composers, the great artists, the great mathematicians, the great mystics, have the faculty of immersing themselves in some creative process with a concentration, a finality, that is beyond most of us. The creative activities of these chessmasters have produced a literature of masterpieces which is one of the glories of the human mind." He then goes on to talk about the "illusions" to be found in modern chess. I must confess that I am somewhat skeptical of his analysis, but I leave it up to the reader to draw his or her own conclusions (see pp. 7 - 8).

    Chapter 2 begins with ADOLF ANDERSSEN (pp. 9 - 41). Reinfeld calls him "The Romantic." "Anderssen has been called 'the incarnation of Romanticism,' and there is a magic quality in his very name which thrills every devotee of chess to this day. Yet there is a bitter-sweet element in Anderssen's glory which is almost more poignant than frank neglect: for this fame is a spurious fame. It is based on a legend, on a tragic misconception. Admiration for Anderssen is blended with contempt; his true genius is obscured beyond recognition." What was Anderssen's "true genius"? For the answer to this question, you will need to read this book. For more information on Adolf Anderssen, see Hermann von Gottschall's Adolf Anderssen der Altmeister deutscher Schachspielkunst.

    Chapter 3 covers PAUL MORPHY (pp. 42 - 71). He refers to Paul Morphy as "The Gentleman." According to Morphy, "Reputation is the only incentive I recognize." "Anderssen's career...began when he was thirty. Paul Morphy's playing days were over before he was twenty-three! In only three years of active play he conquered the Old World as well as the New, gave the development of chess theory a mighty impetus, set new standards for accurate and elegant play, enriched the chess world with many beautiful games." Eight years after Reinfeld wrote "The Human Side of Chess," Frances Parkinson Keyes wrote a fictional account of Paul Morhpy's life, The Chess Players (608 pages). She lists Reinfeld's book on page 606 of her bibliography. One of the best books on Morphy was published in 1976 by David Lawson, Paul Morphy: Pride and Sorrow of Chess (424 pp.). In my opinion, the best book on Morphy's games is Valeri Beim's Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective (164 pp.; published 2005).

    Chapter 4 covers WILHELM STEINITZ (pp. 72 - 118) who Reinfeld refers to as "The Lawgiver." Reinfeld states that "Wilhelm Steinitz, who has been fittingly described as 'the Michelangelo of chess,' was the most original thinker, the most courageous player, and the most remarkable personality that the chess world has produced in the fifteen or so centuries that the game has been in existence. Steinitz was born in circumstances of great poverty in Prague on May 14, 1836; he died a charity patient in the East River Sanatorium on Ward's Island in New York on August 12, 1900." Kurt Landsberger has written two very scholarly works on Steinitz: William Steinitz, Chess Champion: A Biography of the Bohemian Caesar (487 pp.) and The Steinitz Papers: Letters and Documents of the First World Chess Champion (325 pp.).

    Chapter 5 on EMANUEL LASKER (pp. 119 - 141) starts off with the interesting assertion: "'Who was the greatest chessplayer of all time?' has narrowed down to: 'Who was the greatest chessplayer of all time--Lasker or Alekhine?'" Reinfeld refers to Lasker as "The Philosopher." "Lasker is elusive, remote, paradoxical. From the outset his career puzzles us because of his life-long interest in philosophy and mathematics. Most chessplayers are...well, chessplyers. But Lasker had two other interests which absorbed his attention at least as much as chess did. He refused to give his whole life, as Steinitz had, to chess. Sometimes years passed without his playing a single serious game; there must have been months on end when he did not look at a chessboard. This gave him poise, breadth of view, a sense of proportion. Even at the age of twenty-one, when he was 'just another chessplayer,' he impressed Hoffer (Steinitz's archenemy) as 'a man of culture and more than average intellect.'" The fact that Albert Einstein wrote the forward to Dr. J. Hannak's biography on Lasker, Emanuel Lasker: The Life of a Chess Master, is evidence of the high esteem Lasker had as an intellectual. In 2005, Andrew Soltis wrote a wonderful book on Lasker's best games of chess, Why Lasker Matters (320 pp.).

    Chapter 6 introduces us to JOSE RAUL CAPABLANCA "The Machine" (pp. 142 - 167). I'm sure that Reinfeld's good friend, Irving Chernev, would have disagreed with Reinfeld's claim in the previous chapter. Chernev, as he wrote in his book "The Golden Dozen," considered Capablanca the greatest chessplayer of all time. Yet, Reinfeld felt that Capablanca was a flawed genius. "Capablanca realized just as well as Lasker that chess had reached a point where one had to take risks in order to obtain winning chances. Lasker had the greatness of character, the resourcefulness, the daring to defy the development of the Macheide; Capablanca did not. The idea of taking such risks was deeply repellent to Capablanca. He, who loved the tidy technique of neat endgames. was horrified by the illogic of risk." What was the Macheide? You will find the answer on page 123 of Reinfeld's text. There are many excellent books on Capablanca, but Fred Reinfeld's The Immortal Games of Capablanca is a wonderful book in its own right (239 pp.); I highly recommend it. Although not primarily a biographical work, Edward G. Winter's Capablanca: A Compendium of Games, Notes, Articles, Correspondence, Illustrations and Other Rare Archival Materials on the Cuban Chess Genius Jose Raul Capablanca, 1882-1942 is noted for its meticulous attention to historical accuracy.

    Chapter 7 focuses on my favorite chessplayer, ALEXANDER ALEKHINE (pp. 168 - 198). Reinfeld calls him "The Fighter." "Some fifteen centuries of chessplaying and theorizing meet and fuse in the style of Alexander Alekhine. He was a very great man in some ways, very weak in others; but above all he was a historical phenomenon, and this gives him a dignity far beyond his personal significance. Many influences were woven into Alekhine's games, but he was no hack, no imitator. Alekhine was the most brilliant, the most artistic, the most dynamic chessplayer in history." What more can you say? His two books on his best games are superb! "My Best Games of Chess 1908 - 1923" (265 pp.) and "My Best Games of Chess 1924 - 1937" (285 pp.) were written before the personal computer, so there are the inevitable flaws, but, for a true lover of chess, these books are to be treasured. The Dover edition, My Best Games of Chess, 1908 - 1937, combines both volumes into a single book.

    Chapter 8 deals with an extraordinary individual, MAX EUWE (pp. 199 - 215). Reinfeld calls him "The Logician." Of the World Champions, he was probably the most prolific chess writer (he wrote over 70 chess books). He earned a doctorate in mathematics from the University of Amsterdam in 1926. He was, undoubtedly, the most underrated of the World Champions. According to Reinfeld, "Euwe's great fighting victory over Alekhine in 1935 has never received due appreciation, and thus Euwe's career poses the paradox: How can a World Champion be the most underrated player in the world; or, how can the most underrated player in the world become World Champion?" Sadly for Euwe's fans, he lost his return match to Alekhine in 1937 (10 losses, 4 wins, and 11 draws). Euwe was fifty-one years old when this book was published. He died on November 26, 1981. The following books should be of interest: "From My Games 1920 - 1937" is an excellent book by Dr. Euwe. In 2001, Alexander Munninghoff wrote "Max Euwe, the Biography" (351 pp.).

    Chapter 9 covers the period following Alekhine's death in 1946 (pp. 216 - 220). This is a very sketchy chapter that deals with the World Championship Tournament of 1948 (won by Botvinnik) and Botvinnik's drawn match with David Bronstein in 1951. Reinfeld concludes this chapter by stating that "Today master chess must be played in the style of Alekhine or not at all." Although he doesn't state it in these terms, Reinfeld is referring to the "dynamic" style that was generally associated with the Soviet School of Chess. Larry Evans used the term eclectics when referring to this style of play, but this term never caught on. (Reference "Dynamic Chess" by R. N. Coles, "The Soviet School of Chess" by A. Kotov & M. Yudovich, and "New Ideas in Chess" by Larry Evans.)

    GAME SECTION. The Games section (pp. 221 - 286) includes 14 annotated games in descriptive notation (two games for each World Champion). This is followed by a section on the Tournament and Match Records of each World Champion (pp. 287 - 296). The book ends with a six page index (pp. 297 - 302).

    CONCLUSION: Of the approximately 700 chess books that I own, this is one of my favorite books; needless to say, I highly recommend it.*** ____________________________________

    * "Nowadays we think of Anderssen's victory as establishing him as the first World Champion. But at the time no official title was involved; he was simply looked upon as the world's best player, as a matter of widespread opinion, but not by way of official status" (p. 22).

    ** Graham Burgess in "The Mammoth Book of Chess" lists the "unofficial" world champions in this order: Philidor, de la Bourdonnais, Staunton, and Morphy. Although he mentions the London Tournament of 1851, he makes no mention of Anderssen. This is rather surprising, because we find the following remark in a book written by Graham Burgess, John Nunn, and John Emms: "Adolf Andeseen...was undoubtedly one of the strongest players of his era and indeed was crowned unofficial World Champion after handsomely winning the great London Tournament of 1851..." ("The Mammoth Book of the World's Greatest Chess Games," p. 14; by the way, a great book!). According to H. Paul Lillebo ("World Champions - reclaiming a lost century," ChessBase website, 4/24/2014), "we ought to extend our official history of the chess world championship by 139 years to recognize these great champions. The revised list will then begin as: François-André Danican Philidor (world champion 1747-1795), Louis La Bourdonnais (world champion 1824-1840), Howard Staunton (world champion 1843-1851), Adolf Anderssen (world champion 1851-1858, 1861-1866), and Paul Morphy (world champion 1858-1861)."

    *** The Ishi Press International reprint (March 2013) includes an introduction by Sam Sloan.

    * Chess Terms: https://chessmart.com/pages/chess-t...

    * Morphy pounds Philidor's Defense: Game Collection: White - Philidor: Morphy

    * Old P-K4 Miniatures: Game Collection: Games for Classes

    * Play Stockfish 1-10: https://labinatorsolutions.github.i...

    A grandmother is watching her grandchild playing on the beach when a huge wave comes and takes him out to sea. She pleads, ‘Please, God, save my only grandson. I beg of you, bring him back.’ With that, a big wave washes the boy back onto the beach, good as new. The grandmother looks up to heaven and says, ‘He had a hat!’


    30 games, 1625-2023

  12. 101 greatest moves ever played(by krabbe)
    Here is what Vladimir Kramnik has to say:
    "Botvinnik’s example and teaching established the modern approach to preparing for competitive chess: regular but moderate physical exercise; analyzing very thoroughly a relatively narrow repertoire of openings; annotating one’s own games, those of past great players and those of competitors; publishing one’s annotations so that others can point out any errors; studying strong opponents to discover their strengths and weaknesses; ruthless objectivity about one’s own strengths and weaknesses."

    “Reading can take you places you have never been before.” — Dr. Seuss

    The talking dog
    A guy spots a sign outside a house that reads “Talking Dog for Sale.” Intrigued, he walks in.

    “So what have you done with your life?” he asks the dog.

    “I’ve led a very full life,” says the dog. “I lived in the Alps rescuing avalanche victims. Then I served my country in Iraq. And now I spend my days reading to the residents of a retirement home.”

    The guy is flabbergasted. He asks the dog’s owner, “Why on earth would you want to get rid of an incredible dog like that?”

    The owner says, “Because he’s a liar! He never did any of that!”

    — Submitted by Harry Nelson

    88 games, 1858-1998

  13. 1485 – 1547 Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro A
    74 games, 1858-2022

  14. 2...De7 !
    I was told that this opening is called Brazilian Defense. I've tried a few times with good results. Also 2...Qe7 idea "The Câmara Defense"

    “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” ― Anna Quindlen

    “Nothing is dearer to a chess player's heart than his rating. Well, of course everyone knows he's under-rated, but his rating, its ups and downs, however miniscule, are his ego's stock-market report.” ― Lev Alburt

    “The ideas which now pass for brilliant innovations and advances are in fact mere revivals of ancient errors, and a further proof of the dictum that those who are ignorant of the past are condemned to repeat it.” ― Henry Hazlitt

    Hunting accident
    Two hunters are out in the woods when one of them collapses. He’s not breathing, and his eyes are glazed. The other guy whips out his cell phone and calls 911.

    “I think my friend is dead!” he yells. “What can I do?”

    The operator says, “Calm down. First, let’s make sure he’s dead.”

    There’s a silence, then a shot. Back on the phone, the guy says, “Okay, now what?”

    — Submitted by Gerald Doka


    45 games, 1920-2006

  15. 44 Minutes from correspondence WCC
    Cloned

    “No kingdom on Earth can surpass the great outdoors.” ― Tamanend

    “It is better to be lowly among men and exalted in the sight of God than to be honoured by men and small in the kingdom of God.” ― Brother Pedro

    “For everything there is a season, and a time for very purpose under heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to break down, and a time to build up, a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak.” — King Solomon

    “The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.” — Leo Tolstoy

    “We should always allow some time to elapse, for time discloses the truth.” —Seneca

    “Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent.” — Carl Sandburg

    “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” ― George R.R. Martin

    “Chess, it’s the struggle against error.” — Johannes Zukertort

    “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” — Lao Tzu

    “He that can’t endure the bad, will not live to see the good.” — Jewish Proverb

    “One gets to know people well when playing at chess and on journeys.” — Russian Proverb

    “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.” ― Anna Quindlen

    “The beginning is the most important part of the work.” — Plato

    “Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.” — William Shakespeare

    “Never leave ’till tomorrow which you can do today.” — Benjamin Franklin

    “Avoid exposing your king to check.” — Yasser Seirawan, paraphrased

    “Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.” — William Shakespeare

    “A crown is merely a hat that lets the rain in.” – Frederick the Great

    “Under the sun the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor bread to the wise, nor wealth to the intelligent, nor success to the skillful, but time and chance govern all. For man does not know his time.” — King Solomon

    “Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.” — William Penn

    “People often complain about lack of time when lack of direction is the real problem.” — Zig Ziglar

    “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” — Albert Einstein

    “The empires of the future are the empires of the mind.” ― Winston Churchill

    “If you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book.” – J.K. Rowling

    “As you teach, you learn.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all.” — Nelson Mandela

    “Protect your pieces.” — John Herron

    “Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” — Theodore Roosevelt

    “Life is a chess match. Every decision you make has a consequence to it.” — P.K. Subban

    “A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.” — Mark Twain

    “Your own soul is nourished when you are kind; it is destroyed when you are cruel.” — King Solomon

    “We choose our joys and sorrows long before we experience them.” — Khalil Gibran

    “Know thy self, know thy enemy. A thousand battles, a thousand victories.” — Sun Tzu

    “Safety first is fine, but first, last and always is fatal" — Al Horowitz

    “Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike.” — Alexander Hamilton

    “Nothing will work unless you do.” — Maya Angelou

    “Talking isn't doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds.” — William Shakespeare

    “Teach your tongue to say “I don’t know” instead of to make up something.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect.” — Vince Lombardi

    “The secret of our success is that we never, never give up.” — Wilma Mankiller

    “Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.” — Lyndon B. Johnson

    “The harder I work, the luckier I get.” — Samuel Goldwyn

    “The level of our success is limited only by our imagination and no act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.” — Aesop

    “Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning.” — Gloria Steinem

    “True happiness is... to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future.” — Lucius Annaeus Seneca

    “Whatever words we utter should be chosen with care for people will hear them and be influenced by them for good or ill." — Buddha

    “Language is wine upon the lips.” — Virginia Woolf

    “A bird that you set free may be caught again, but a word that escapes your lips will not return.” — Jewish Proverb

    “A lion sleeps in the heart of every brave man.” — Turkish Proverb

    “If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.” — George Washington

    “The power to question is the basis of all human progress.” — Indira Gandhi

    “Life is like chess. If you lose your queen, you will probably lose the game.” — Being Caballero

    “Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.” — William Shakespeare

    “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.” — Ephesians 4:29

    "Life is a song - sing it. Life is a game - play it. Life is a challenge - meet it. Life is a dream - realize it. Life is a sacrifice - offer it. Life is love - enjoy it." — Sai Baba

    “Love is as strong as death; its jealousy as unyielding as the grave. It burns like a blazing fire; like a mighty flame. Many waters cannot quench love, rivers cannot wash it away.” — King Solomon

    “The real secret of success is enthusiasm.” — Walter Chrysler

    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” — Socrates

    How beautiful on the mountains are the feet of those who bring good news, who proclaim peace, who bring good tidings, who proclaim salvation, who say to Zion, "Your God reigns!" — Isaiah 52:7

    “When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.” — Thomas Paine

    “When a man's mind rides faster than his horse can gallop they quickly both tire.” — John Webster

    “After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.” — Nelson Mandela

    “It is only after our basic needs for food and shelter have been met that we can hope to enjoy the luxury of theoretical speculations." — Aristotle

    “A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.” — King Solomon

    “Chess is a miniature version of life. To be successful, you need to be disciplined, assess resources, consider responsible choices, and adjust when circumstances change.” — Susan Polgar

    “I've run into more discrimination as a woman than as an Indian.” — Wilma Mankiller

    “Success is simple. Do what's right, the right way, at the right time.” — Arnold H. Glasow

    “God gave man two ears and one mouth, so listen more and talk less.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Learn to play many roles, to be whatever the moment requires. Adapt your mask to the situation.” — Robert Greene

    “Reading can take you places you have never been before.” — Dr. Seuss

    “During a chess competition a chessmaster should be a combination of a beast of prey and a monk." — Alexander Alekhine

    “No man is free who is not master of himself.” — Epictetus

    “Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” — Gustave Flaubert

    “Chess isn’t for the timid.” — Irving Chernev

    “Whoever is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city.” — King Solomon

    “What you don’t see with your eyes, don’t invent with your mouth.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Fishes live in the sea, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones.” — William Shakespeare

    “Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.” — Charles R. Swindoll

    “The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.” — Ernest Hemingway

    “We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality.” — Lucius Annaeus Seneca

    “Chess is a sport. The main object in the game of chess remains the achievement of victory.” — Max Euwe

    “Success is dependent on effort.” — Sophocles

    “No fantasy, however rich, no technique, however masterly, no penetration into the psychology of the opponent, however deep, can make a chess game a work of art, if these qualities do not lead to the main goal – the search for truth." — Vasily Smyslov

    “Don't sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them.” — Madam C. J. Walker

    “When my opponent’s clock is going I discuss general considerations in an internal dialogue with myself. When my own clock is going I analyze concrete variations." — Mikhail Botvinnik

    “Let our advance worrying become advance thinking and planning.” — Winston Churchill

    “Do not plot harm against your neighbor, who lives trustfully near you.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” — George Orwell

    “Attack! Always Attack!” — Adolf Anderssen

    “Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.” — William Shakespeare

    “Chess is 99 percent tactics” — Richard Teichmann

    “What we think, we become." — Buddha

    “There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.” — Alexander Hamilton

    “Dream big, stay positive, work hard, and enjoy the journey." — Urijah Faber

    “There is little that can withstand a man who can conquer himself.” — Louis XIV

    “The time is always right to do what is right.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

    “A true king is neither tyrant nor pawn. He is more than the sum of his ambitions.” — Mark Lawrence

    “Lose with truth and right rather than gain with falsehood and wrong.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.” — Arthur Ashe

    “After we have paid our dutiful respects to such frigid virtues as calculation, foresight, self-control and the like, we always come back to the thought that speculative attack is the lifeblood of chess.” — Fred Reinfeld

    “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” — Eleanor Roosevelt

    “Some men have thousands of reasons why they cannot do what they want to, when all they need is one reason why they can.” — Martha Graham

    “The single most important thing in life is to believe in yourself regardless of what everyone else says.” — Hikaru Nakamura

    “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” — William Shakespeare

    “A man of high principles is someone who can watch a chess game without passing comment.” — Chinese Proverb

    “Wise men store up learning, but the foolish will be destroyed with their mouths.” — King Solomon

    “Do not be wise in words – be wise in deeds.” — Jewish Proverb

    “The beauty of a game of chess is usually assessed according to the sacrifices it contains.” — Rudolf Spielmann

    “Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God; trust also in me." — Jesus Christ

    “They do not love that do not show their love.” — William Shakespeare

    “Some part of a mistake is always correct.” — Savielly Tartakower

    “The most important feature of the chess position is the activity of the pieces. This is absolutely fundamental in all phases of the game: Opening, Middlegame and especially Endgame. The primary constraint on a piece’s activity is the Pawn structure.” — Michael Stean

    “Pawns are born free, yet they are everywhere in chains.” — Rick Kennedy

    “Every Pawn is a potential Queen.” — James Mason

    “The passed pawn is a criminal, who should be kept under lock and key. Mild measures, such as police surveillance, are not sufficient.” — Aron Nimzowitsch

    “The task of the positional player is systematically to accumulate slight advantages and try to convert temporary advantages into permanent ones, otherwise the player with the better position runs the risk of losing it.” — Wilhelm Steinitz

    “It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” — Samuel Adams

    “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome.” — Booker T. Washington

    “Simple plans are best. Tactics will prevail.” — C.J.S. Purdy

    “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” — Abraham Lincoln

    “In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” — Dwight D. Eisenhower

    “One bad move nullifies forty good ones.” — Bernhard Horwitz

    “The defensive power of a pinned piece is only imaginary." — Aaron Nimzovich

    “All things being equal, the player will prevail who first succeeds in uniting the efforts of both rooks in an important direction.” — Eugene Znosko-Borovsky

    “He who has a slight disadvantage plays more attentively, inventively and more boldly than his antagonist who either takes it easy or aspires after too much. Thus a slight disadvantage is very frequently seen to convert into a good, solid advantage.” — Emanuel Lasker

    “If you don't know what to do, find your worst piece and look for a better square.” — Gerald Schwarz

    “If I see something dirty or untidy, I have to clean it up.” — Indira Gandhi

    “Up to this point, White has been following well-known analysis. But now he makes a fatal error: he begins to use his own head.” — Siegbert Tarrasch

    “After a bad opening, there is hope for the middle game. After a bad middle game, there is hope for the endgame. But once you are in the endgame, the moment of truth has arrived.” — Edmar Mednis

    “Do not let kindness and truth leave you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart.” — King Solomon

    “If you have made a mistake or committed an inaccuracy there is no need to become annoyed and to think that everything is lost. You have to reorientate yourself quickly and find a new plan in the new situation.” — David Bronstein

    “Things often did not reach the endgame!” — Boris Spassky

    “Never trust the man who tells you all his troubles but keeps from you all his joys.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Winning is not a secret that belongs to a very few, winning is something that we can learn by studying ourselves, studying the environment, and making ourselves ready for any challenge that is in front of us.” — Garry Kasparov

    “To keep the body in good health is a duty... otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.” — Buddha

    “I see only one move ahead, but always the best move.” — Charles Jaffe

    “Do not envy a violent man or choose any of his ways, for the Lord detests a perverse man but takes the upright into his confidence.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Chess is a matter of delicate judgment, knowing when to punch and how to duck.” — Bobby Fischer

    “As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

    “It is never safe to take the queen knight pawn with the queen – even when it is safe.” — Hungarian proverb

    “What one has, one doesn’t want, and what one wants, one doesn’t have.” — Jewish Proverb

    “Time is free, but it’s priceless. You can’t own it, but you can use it. You can’t keep it, but you can spend it. Once you’ve lost it you can never get it back.” —Harvey Mackay

    “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” ― Frederick Douglass

    “Train up a child in the way that he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” — King Solomon

    “Creating little plans. Now, when we think about plans in chess, we think about [grand] grandmaster plans. You have to calculate ten moves deep. You have to know what's going to happen in ten moves, know that strong. What Jonathan Hawkins talks about [IM Hawkins book: Amateur to IM] is you have to create small plans which are doable which you can execute easily. One, two, three move plans which your opponent is not going to be able to prevent, which are easy to visualize and execute.” — @HangingPawns

    “Chess is rarely a game of ideal moves. Almost always, a player faces a series of difficult consequences whichever move he makes.” — David Shenk

    “First-class players lose to second-class players because second-class players sometimes play a first-class game.” — Siegbert Tarrasch

    “Consistency is the x to every y.” ― Monaristw

    “The lesser of two evils is still evil.” — King Solomon

    “Masterpieces are not single and solitary births; they are the outcome of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice.” — Virginia Woolf

    “A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man perfected without trials.” — Lucius Annaeus Seneca

    “Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship.” — Buddha

    "Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." — Proverbs 16:24

    “Success is the achievement of a desired goal, such as for obtaining name and fame or wealth or a higher degree, for which a person has tried his level best. It is the positive consequence of one's achievement.” — John Wooden

    “Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.” — Albert Schweitzer

    “Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.” — Dale Carnegie

    “Success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming.” — John Wooden

    “For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” — Nelson Mandela

    “People who want to improve should take their defeats as lessons, and endeavor to learn what to avoid in the future. You must always have the courage of your convictions. If you think your move is good, make it.” — Jose Raul Capablanca

    “It is not what we do that matters, but what a sovereign God chooses to do through us. God doesn't want our success; He wants us. He doesn't demand our achievements; He demands our obedience. The Kingdom of God is a kingdom of paradox, where through the ugly defeat of a cross, a holy God is utterly glorified. Victory comes through defeat; healing through brokenness; finding self through losing self.” — Charles Colson

    “Growth is a painful process.” — Wilma Mankiller

    “But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes.” — William Shakespeare

    “I go over many games collections and pick up something from the style of each player.” — Mikhail Tal

    “Whatever your life's work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

    “Self-confidence is very important. If you don’t think you can win, you will take cowardly decisions in the crucial moments, out of sheer respect for your opponent. You see the opportunity but also greater limitations than you should. I have always believed in what I do on the chessboard, even when I had no objective reason to. It is better to overestimate your prospects than underestimate them.” — Magnus Carlsen

    “Do not boast about tomorrow, for you know not what a day may bring.” — King Solomon

    “Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others. He who envies others does not obtain peace of mind.” — Buddha

    "For God so loved the World that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life." — Jesus Christ

    “Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.” — Confucius

    “Chess is like life. To succeed in either one takes patience, planning, concentration, the willingness to set goals, and an inclination to see deeply into things. You have to go for the thing beyond. Chess is about seeing the underlying reality.” — Maurice Ashley

    “Chaos is inherent in all compounded things. Strive on with diligence.” — Buddha

    “If you are not a better person tomorrow than you are today, what need have you for a tomorrow?” — Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

    "Now then, my sons, listen to me; blessed are those who keep my ways. Listen to my instruction and be wise; do not ignore it." — Proverbs 8:32-33

    “Build a worthy family, stay on the path of virtue, and you shall be rewarded.” —Elana Roth

    “The reward for work well done is the opportunity to do more.” — Jonas Salk

    “Let freedom reign. The sun never set on so glorious a human achievement.” — Nelson Mandela

    * Chess Terms: https://chessmart.com/pages/chess-t...

    * FIDE Laws of Chess (2018): https://www.schachschiri.de/fide_18...

    * Records: http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/records...

    * Wikipedia on Computer Chess: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compu...

    * Susan Polgar Daily: https://chessdailynews.com/

    * Prep for Ivan: http://gettingto2000.blogspot.com/

    * John's brother Lee: https://hotoffthechess.com/

    * Children's Chess: https://chessimprover.com/category/...

    * Amateur / Pins: http://amateur-chess.blogspot.com/

    * Improver: https://chessimprover.com/author/br...

    * Jimmy's place: http://www.jimmyvermeer.com/

    * Evolution: Game Collection: # Chess Evolution Volumes 51-100

    * GPA: https://chesstier.com/grand-prix-at...

    InkHarted wrote:

    Checkmate.
    I started off as an equal
    I have everything that they do
    my life was one and the same as my foe
    childish battles of lesser
    I won baring cost of a little
    but as time outgrew my conscience
    I found that the pieces were moving against me
    with time my company reduced
    they left one by one
    all in time forgetting me
    my castles collapsed
    my religion dissuaded
    my protectors in hiding
    I could not run anymore
    I have been cornered to a wall
    as the queen left silently
    without saying goodbye
    I could not live any longer
    she was most precious to me
    I could not win without her by my side
    so the king knelt down and died.

    “Death may be the greatest of all human blessings.” — Socrates

    “Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.” — William Shakespeare

    “As proved by evidence, it (chess) is more lasting in its being and presence than all books and achievements; the only game that belongs to all people and all ages; of which none knows the divinity that bestowed it on the world, to slay boredom, to sharpen the senses, to exhilarate the spirit.” — Stefan Zweig

    “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” — Nelson Mandela

    “The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks, and starting on the first one.” — Mark Twain

    “Success is the sum of small efforts - repeated day in and day out.” — Robert Collier

    “Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.” — Benjamin Franklin

    “Satisfaction consists in freedom from pain, which is the positive element of life.” — Arthur Schopenhauer

    My child, pay attention to what I say. Listen carefully to my words. … Guard your heart above all else, for it determines the course of your life. — Proverbs 4:20, 23 NLT

    “Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them.” — Dalai Lama

    “Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

    “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.” — Ronald Reagan

    “Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” — Soren Kierkegaard

    504 Gateway Time-out

    “The ideas which now pass for brilliant innovations and advances are in fact mere revivals of ancient errors, and a further proof of the dictum that those who are ignorant of the past are condemned to repeat it.” ― Henry Hazlitt

    “Better to be king of your silence than slave of your words.” ― William Shakespeare

    “Know the true value of time; snatch, seize, and enjoy every moment of it. No idleness, no laziness, no procrastination; Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.” — Lord Chesterfield

    Q: What do you call a can opener that doesn’t work? A: A can’t opener!


    70 games, 1950-2011

  16. 98_A45 - Trompowski trumps
    Cloned from WhiteShark

    Here's a <MUST SEE> appetizer for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sey... refering to Vaganian vs Kupreichik, 1974

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trompo...
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trompo...

    Opening Explorer (after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5)

    Opening Explorer (after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 Ne4 3. h4 )

    check also Game Collection: Tromfovsky Opening - Rey ... and Game Collection: Anti-KIDs

    ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5

    <Winning with the Trompowsky> by Peter Wells

    004 Annotated Bibliography

    005 Introduction

    013 1 2...Ne4 Introduction and Minor Lines

    023 2 2...Ne4 3 Bf4 c5 4 f3 Qa5+ 5 c3 Nf6

    The Attacking Repertoire with 6 d5!?

    050 3 2...Ne4 3 Bf4 c5 4 f3 Qa5+ 5 c3 Nf6

    The Solid Repertoire with 6 Nd2

    074 4 2...Ne4 3 Bf4 d5

    Introduction and the Attacking Repertoire with 4 f3

    091 5 2...Ne4 3 Bf4 d5

    The Solid Repertoire with 4 e3!?

    120 6 2...c5

    Introduction and the Solid Repertoire with 3 Bxf6

    141 7 2...c5

    The Attacking Repertoire with 3 d5!?

    173 8 2...e6 3 e4!?

    209 9 2...d5 Introduction and 3 Bxf6

    232 10 2...g6 and Other Minor 2nd Moves

    239 Index of Main Variations

    240 Index of Games

    ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5

    Die Trompowsky-Eröffnung (1. d4 Sf6 2. Lg5) gehört wohl zu denen abseits der großen Hauptkomplexe, die in den letzten zehn Jahren die rasanteste Entwicklung hinter sich haben. Auch literarisch ist dies der Fall: Als Quellen sind allein fünf größere Werke seit 1995 angegeben (auf Deutsch ein Buch von Gerstner und eine CD von Knaak). Und trotzdem gibt es schon wieder jede Menge neuer Entwicklungen - ein bezeichnendes Beispiel: In einer der Hauptvarianten, 1.d4 Sf6 2.Lg5 Se4 3.Lf4 c5 4.f3 Da5+ 5.c3 Sf6 6.Sd2 cxd4 7.Sb3 Db6 8.Dxd4 Sc6 9. Dxb6 axb6, sind dem Zug 10.Sd4 in älteren Büchern nur etwa 10 bis 20 Zeilen gewidmet, bei Wells breitet er sich als absolute Nr. 1 unter diversen Alternativen über fast acht Seiten aus. Und obwohl das Buch nur Empfehlungen für Weiß beinhaltet und keinesfalls mit Varianten überladen ist (dazu später mehr), hat es einen doch recht erheblichen Umfang erreicht. Die Frage, ob ein neues Trompowsky-Buch schon wieder sinnvoll oder gar notwendig ist, kann also wohl bedenkenlos mit Ja beantwortet werden (zumal das relativ neueste der anderen Werke, ein spanisches, hier zu Lande so gut wie unbekannt sein dürfte).

    Wie gesagt, ist es ein Repertoirebuch, dem der Leser folgen sollte, um davon zu profitieren; eine grundlegende Wahl bleibt ihm aber: Zu den drei Hauptsystemen gibt Wells jeweils ein doppeltes Angebot, einmal offensiv, einmal solide. Mir scheinen damit eigentlich auch alle wichtigen und aktuellen Varianten abgedeckt; hier aber doch noch ein paar Hinweise, was drin ist und was nicht: Nach 2...Se4 wird nur 3.Lf4 behandelt (nicht 3.Lh4 oder 3.h4), nach 3...c5 4.F3 Da5+ 5.c3 Sf6 dann 6.d5 (offensiv) und 6.Sd 2 (solid). Bei 3...d5 liegt die Wahl zwischen 4.e3 (solid) bzw. 4.f3 Sf6 5.e4 (offensiv) und 2.-c5 wird mit 3.Lf6 (solid) oder 3. d5 (offensiv) beantwortet, aber 3.Sc3 bleibt weg. Und zu 2...e6 3.e4 h6 4. Lf6 Dxf6 ist anzumerken, dass Wells immer den f-Bauern frei haben will, das ältere 5.Sf3 (zu dem es eine Menge Material gibt) fehlt also völlig. Wer den Ideen des Autors folgt, wird aber m.E. sehr gut bedient. Im Vergleich zu anderen Büchern dieses Kalibers bringt Wells trotz der beachtlichen Seitenzahl relativ wenig Varianten (vor allem praktisch keine kompletten unkommentierten Datenbankpartien) und ziemlich viele Erklärungen, die auch allgemein-strategische und turnierpraktische Dinge umfassen; er ist offensichtlich immer bemüht, verbal und mit Varianten den Kern einer Sache zu treffen und das weniger Wichtige kurz zu halten bzw. ganz wegzulassen. Dazu kommen viele eigene Ideen, Analysen und Empfehlungen. Sicher muss davon noch manches praktisch ausprobiert werden, bevor man ein genaues Urteil treffen kann (ich selbst will mich dabei zurückhalten, da meine letzten Trompowsky-Erfahrungen schon einige Jahre her und also nicht mehr auf neuestem Stand sind, während Wells nicht nur GM ist, sondern auch reichlich Trompowsky-Praxis mit beiden Farben besitzt), aber zumindest bei der ersten Lektüre macht es durchweg einen starken Eindruck. Wells versucht m.E. auch nicht, die weißen Chancen gezielt "gut zu schreiben" (wie manche einschlägig bekannten Spezialisten), es kommt auch keineswegs immer ein nachweisbares Plus für Weiß heraus, sondern das Hauptgewicht liegt darauf, dass der bessere Kenner in relativ ungewöhnlichen Stellungen auf praktische Vorteile hoffen kann.

    Technisch habe ich ein paar Fehler entdeckt, z.B. bei Zugumstellungen oder bei einer Variante, wo der 10. und 11. Zug von Schwarz jeweils Da6 heißen, aber das stört keinesfalls den Gesamteindruck.

    FM Gerd Treppner, Rochade Europa 08/2003 Vorbildlich in jeder Beziehung der englische GM Wells: Ausgiebige Erläuterungen in strategischer, theoretischer und turnierpraktischer Hinsicht. Detaillierte Analysen (in die seine Erfahrungen aus Sitzungen mit Hodgson, McShane und anderen einfließen) dort, wo sie sein müssen.

    Es handelt sich um ein Repertoirebuch, wobei der Autor allerdings meist zwei Züge zur Auswahl stellt: einen aktiven und einen eher soliden. Freaks mögen bedauern, dass die eine oder andere extravagante Spielweise wie z. B. 1. d4 Sf6 2.L.g5 Se4 3. h4 c5 4. d:c5 Da5+ 5. Sd2 Lg5 6. h:g5 g6 7. Th4!? (Wells behandelt nur 3. Lf4) oder 2... c5 3. Sc3 c:d4 4.D:d4 Sc6 5. Dh4 (besprochen wird 3. L:f6 und 3. d5) wegfiel - das ist der Preis für den o. g. Ansatz. Aufschlussreich ist Wells' Parallelanalyse, beispielsweise zu Varianten aus dem Ben-Oni. Der Autor wägt nach etwa 1. d4 Sf6 2. Lg5 Se4 3. Lf4 c5 4. f3 Da5+ 5. c3 Sf6 6. d5 d6 7. e4 g6 das Für und Wider ab (Besonderheiten im Vergleich zu Ben-Oni sind die Stellung von Da5 und des c3). Neben der strategischen befindet sich auch die theoretische Diskussion auf der Höhe, wichtig ist z. B. das klare Herausstellen des "Handels mit Optionen": dieser und jener Zug führen meist zur selben Stellung, indes erlaubt Zug A die Abweichung x und Zug B die Abweichung y. Lieber Leser, entscheide selbst, was dir unangenehmer wäre. Erläuterungen dieser Art sucht man bei Müller/Voigt und Gutman vergebens.

    Platz wird an anderer Stelle gespart, z. B. widmet Wells dem anspruchslosen 2... e6 3. e4 Le7 nur eine Seite, obwohl es Tonnen von Partien dazu gibt. Aber das Spiel gestaltet sich unproblematisch; gesunder Menschenverstand reicht aus, um mit Weiß das etwas bessere Spiel zu erlangen. Hingegen wird 3... h6 4. L:f6 D:f6 (z. B. 5. Sc3 d6 6. Dd2 g5!?), wo Schwarz im Austausch für seinen Raumnachteil das Läuferpaar erhält, penibel abgehandelt.

    Fazit: Alle Erläuterungen sind auf den Punkt gebracht, hinzu kommt eine gute Recherche. Eines der überzeugendsten Eröffnungsbücher der letzten Jahre! Ein reichlich fades (aber nicht unübersichtliches) Layout mit vergessener Silbentrennung ist ein kleiner, nicht dem Autor anzulastender Kritikpunkt.

    Harald Keilhack Schach 06/2004

    Nach einer relativ ruhigen Phase zeigt sich der englische Verlag Batsford in letzter Zeit wieder erfreulich produktiv, mit "Winning with the Trompowsky" ist dort nach längerer Zeit sogar wieder ein Eröffnungsbuch erschienen. Schon die Kombination von Thema und Autor weckt eine gewisse Vorfreude:

    Die Trompowsky-Eröffnung hat sich zwar längst als vollwertig etabliert, ist aber dennoch nicht besonders häufig anzutreffen und genießt noch einen gewissen exotischen Ruf.

    Ihre enorme Spanne an unterschiedlichen Stellungstypen, eine im Vergleich zu anderen Eröffnungen noch nicht ganz ins uferlose gehende Theorie und die Möglichkeit, bereits im zweiten Zug den weiteren Verlauf selbst bestimmen zu können machen sie zu einer für ein breites Spektrum von Spielern sehr interessanten Eröffnung.

    Der Autor wiederum hat sich unter anderem durch seine Arbeit für das ChessBase Magazin einen Namen gemacht, in dem er eine Rubrik über Strategie im Schach betreut.

    Davon profitiert nun auch dieses Buch, denn man merkt Peter Wells darin die Erfahrung bei der Erklärung strategischer Aspekte an.

    Damit wollen wir nun etwas genauer auf "Winning with the Trompowsky" eingehen. Zunächst einmal handelt es sich um ein Repertoire-Buch für Weiß-Spieler mit der Ausgangsstellung 1.d4 Sf6 2.Lg5.

    Nach einer ersten Einführung folgen die zehn Kapitel mit der Theorie und zahlreichen praktischen Beispielen. Dabei zeigen sich schnell zwei wesentliche Punkte dieses Buches. Zum einen versteht es der Autor, beim Leser durch gute Erklärungen ein gutes Verständnis zu entwickeln, wozu auch die Erörterung von Vor-und Nachteilen bei der Wahl der Zugfolge und der Bezug auf ähnliche Stellungstypen aus anderen Systemen gehört.

    Zum anderen bietet er in allen wichtigen Hauptvarianten die Wahl zwischen einem "soliden" und einem "aggressiven" Repertoire. Wir wollen hier den Aufbau der Kapitel kurz skizzieren, damit auch erfahrene Trompowsky-Anhänger entscheiden können, ob ihnen das hier erstellte Repertoire zusagt, denn die Qualität und die Tiefe des Repertoires ist sicher nicht nur für Neueinsteiger sehr zu empfehlen.

    Nach einem einführenden Kapitel über 2...Se4 und einer Besprechung der Nebenvarianten folgen zwei Kapitel über die Hauptvariante 2...Se4 3.Lf4 c5 4.f3 Da5+ 5.c3 Sf6. Dabei wird zuerst das "Angriffs-Repertoire" mit 6.d5 besprochen, danach kommt das "solide" Repertoire mit 6.Sd2 an die Reihe. Gegen 2...Se4 3.Lf4 d5 gibt es wieder eine Einführung, ein "Angriffs-Repertoire" mit 4.f3, das nächste Kapitel zeigt dann das "solide" 4.e3.

    Diese fünf Kapitel nehmen bereits etwa die Hälfte des Buches ein, nun steht mit 2...c5 ein weiterer Schwerpunkt auf dem Programm. Wieder bietet Wells eine Einführung und erarbeitet ein "solides" Repertoire mit 3.Lxf6, das "Angriffs-Repertoire" im nächsten Kapitel ist auf 3.d5 aufgebaut.

    Die restlichen drei Kapitel beschäftigen sich mit den sonstigen Möglichkeiten für Schwarz, also z.B. mit 2...e6 (worauf 3.e4 vorgeschlagen wird), 2...d5 (mit 3.Lxf6) und 2...g6 und sonstige Nebenvarianten im zweiten Zug.

    Die Theorie ist übrigens auf ausführlich kommentierten Musterpartien aufgebaut, die die wichtigsten Abspiele darstellen. In den Kommentaren finden sich natürlich noch viele zusätzliche Abspiele, mit denen Sie das Repertoire ergänzen oder anders gestalten können.

    Insgesamt umfasst das Buch 52 dieser Musterpartien, unter den Weiß-Spielern finden sich übrigens neben dem Trompowsky-Guru Hodgon auch Weltklassespieler wie Akopian, Lputjan oder Adams.

    Als Fazit bleibt die Feststellung, wie beeindruckend vielseitig sich diese Eröffnung präsentiert und somit für jeden Geschmack etwas bietet, und das alles wird in "Winning with the Trompowsky" auch noch sehr überzeugend dargestellt.

    Weitere Pluspunkte verdienen die klaren Einschätzungen von Wells, durch die man sich gut orientieren kann, das mit 240 kompakt bedruckten Seiten sehr umfangreiche Material sowie der gute Druck. Mit zumindest grundlegenden Englischkenntnissen sollte dieses gelungene Eröffnungsbuch gut zu meistern sein.

    Schachmarkt 02/2004

    ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5 - ♗g5

    234 games, 1926-2022

  17. 98_B22_Alapin Sillycian 2.c3 by whiteshark
    Cloned from whiteshark

    98_B22_Alapin Sillycian 2.c3

    Advocating 2...d6

    * 1994: Ljubojevic vs Polgar, 1994

    * 2016: K Kiik vs V Artemiev, 2016

    * Evolution: Game Collection: # Chess Evolution Volumes 51-100

    * Play Stockfish 1-10: https://labinatorsolutions.github.i...

    31 games, 1943-2019

  18. A Try for White
    Cloned

    “Reading can take you places you have never been before.” — Dr. Seuss

    “Nothing is dearer to a chess player's heart than his rating. Well, of course everyone knows he's under-rated, but his rating, its ups and downs, however miniscule, are his ego's stock-market report.” ― Lev Alburt

    “The ideas which now pass for brilliant innovations and advances are in fact mere revivals of ancient errors, and a further proof of the dictum that those who are ignorant of the past are condemned to repeat it.” ― Henry Hazlitt

    This is a collection of games from Sam Collins's excellent book, "A Simple Chess Opening Repertoire for White," which presents a complete king's pawn repertoire focused around the isolated queen's pawn (IQP) and related lines -- generally where White plays for dark square control and attack in an open position. This is a very good repertoire for ambitious young players because it teaches an important pawn structure that can arise in a wide range of both d-pawn or e-pawn openings, and it therefore creates the basis for assimilating a wide range of opening ideas. Though I am personally interested in some variations in the book more than others, I have long been interested in the IQP structure and have found much of value in the book on the IQP generally -- as I had from Collins's earlier opening repertoire for White titled "An Attacking Repertoire for White" (which also focused on the IQP but with rather less "simple" lines). Ambitious players would do well to also spend some time studying the isolated queen pawn structure. I would especially recommend finding GM Alexandr Baburin's now classic "Winning Pawn Structures"; the book is out of print and often available only at inflated prices, but a number of .pdf copies can readily be found on the web, including at Scribd. I have also found the book "Isolani Strategy" by Alexander Beliavsky, Oleg Stetsko, and Adrian Mikhalchishin of use, though it is also becoming more rare. For those less interested in books, there are a number of online videos and articles that can be of help as well. One useful resources is titled "1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 White Repertoire Webliography," which links to videos and articles on lines very similar to those discussed by Collins in his 1.e4 e5 repertoire.

    The weakest part of the repertoire is the French Defense, which is based on ideas developed by Denis Yevseev in Fighting the French: A New Concept (nearly 400 pages of dense analysis on this line). Though playable at the amateur level, there are lots of ways for Black to do well if he knows the theory. I would simplify the repertoire more by recommending the Monte Carlo Exchange French with 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.c4 (you can find good analysis online). This way White can transpose to familiar territory from the Scandinavian as well after 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.c4!? with the idea of returning the pawn to 3...c6 (Panov-Botvinnik) or 3...e6 (Monte Carlo Exchange French - Game Collection: French Defense, Monte Carlo Exchange Variation or https://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/...).

    You can also simplify more by playing the Hunt or Chase Variation against the Alekhine (1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.c4 Nb6 4.c5!?), which can transpose to the c3 Sicilian (though White has other ideas too -- see the game Mazukewitsch - Kandaurov, Tula 1967, for example). And it would be good to learn the main line Panov-Botvinnik against the Caro-Kann -- though that does not simplify White's task - see http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2....

    * All Openings: Game Collection: Chess Openings: Theory and Practice, Section 1

    * Chess Terms: https://chessmart.com/pages/chess-t...

    * Evolution: Game Collection: # Chess Evolution Volumes 51-100

    * Morphy pounds Philidor's Defense: Game Collection: White - Philidor: Morphy

    * Play Stockfish 1-10: https://labinatorsolutions.github.i...

    Hunting accident
    Two hunters are out in the woods when one of them collapses. He’s not breathing, and his eyes are glazed. The other guy whips out his cell phone and calls 911.

    “I think my friend is dead!” he yells. “What can I do?”

    The operator says, “Calm down. First, let’s make sure he’s dead.”

    There’s a silence, then a shot. Back on the phone, the guy says, “Okay, now what?”

    — Submitted by Gerald Doka

    56 games, 1964-2017

  19. A vigorous chess opening for black
    1.e4-1.e5 sidelines

    “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” ― George R.R. Martin

    “Nothing is dearer to a chess player's heart than his rating. Well, of course everyone knows he's under-rated, but his rating, its ups and downs, however miniscule, are his ego's stock-market report.” ― Lev Alburt

    “The ideas which now pass for brilliant innovations and advances are in fact mere revivals of ancient errors, and a further proof of the dictum that those who are ignorant of the past are condemned to repeat it.” ― Henry Hazlitt

    A grumpy monk
    Every 10 years, the monks in the monastery are allowed to break their vow of silence to speak two words. Ten years go by and it’s one monk’s first chance. He thinks for a second before saying, “Food bad.”

    Ten years later, he says, “Bed hard.”

    It’s the big day, a decade later. He gives the head monk a long stare and says, “I quit.”

    “I’m not surprised,” the head monk says. “You’ve been complaining ever since you got here.”

    — Submitted by Alan Lynch

    .


    8 games, 1919-2020

  20. A06s X
    18 games, 1868-2023

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