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Skewbrow
Member since Jan-21-14 · Last seen Jan-26-22
I am a mathematician by profession, but kinda suck at chess. But I love playing with my son - even though since we bought a clock my record against him is 1W - 299L (or thereabouts, I've lost exact count).

My dearest chess moment is from one of the games against the kid. He was something like 7-8 years old at the time. I captured his queen, but exposed myself to a backrank mate while doing that. The look on his face when he reached for the rook, barely reaching across the table to the backrank to deliver the mate ... I will never forget that.

Oh, I'm the father of all the Switching Quylthulgs :-)


   Skewbrow has kibitzed 51 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Jan-10-22 D Anton Guijarro vs Y Santiago, 2018 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Delighted that I was able to see how it goes when black won't capture the rook. Anyone just saying Rf6+,P+R,Qg7x get only half a point, I think.
 
   Dec-13-21 Dvoirys vs Yagupov, 2004 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Nice to get one of the new Mondays for a change. Queen takes rook, rook takes, leads to a back rank check and a family fork Ng5+.
 
   Nov-10-21 A Filipowicz vs Knaak, 1974 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: 35..Rxe4+ is decisive. Three counters by white. A) 36. Kxe4 Qf4+ 37.Kd3 Qd4x is a merciful forced exitus. B) 36.fxe4 Qf4+ 37. Kd3 Bxe2+ 38. Kxe2 Qxe4+ is threatening the c2 pawn as well as king+rook forks. White is already down R+B vs. Q and cannot cover everything. C) 36.Kd3 Rxe2.
 
   May-31-21 Le Quang Liem vs E Hansen, 2018 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: 48..Ne2+ is the obvious start. The knight at h3 is safe for 49. Kxh3 is followed by 49...Qg3x, so white had better try something else. 49. Kg2 also succumbs to 49.. Qg3+ 50. Kh1 Nf2+. But it took me embarrassingly long to spot that 49. Kh1 should be met with the family fork Ng3+. I
 
   May-19-20 V Malaniuk vs Van der Sterren, 1983 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Black is down a piece and White is threatening Qf6 and mate along the main diagonal. I thought that for one time's sake we need to find a brilliant defensive move, but I don't see anything satisfactory. The best try may be 28.. Rxd5 29. Qf6 Rd4 30. Bxd4 cxd4 thwarting the mate ...
 
   May-18-20 S Landau vs Reti, 1927 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: 18..Rd1+ and white loses either a queen vs. a rook or a rook. 19. Bf1 Qxc3 20. Rxc3 Rxa1 or 19.Rxd1 Qxc3.
 
   Feb-25-20 K Darga vs R Von Saldern, 1951 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Simple enough for me. Qh8+ is obviously looming but not too powerful while the black king has luft in f7. That threat does keep black ambitions about the d4-pawn under control. This leaves the idea of 38. Bxf5 (this is a puzzle after all, so something flashy is required). If black ...
 
   Jan-28-20 A Tari vs O Girya, 2018 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: White has a bishop for two pawns. The immediate trouble is that the white minor pieces are sitting there like shish-kebab on the skewer of doubled black rooks. That problem is easily resolved with 37. Nxd5. True, the bishop at e2 is only defended once, but the knight can retaliate:
 
   Nov-21-19 Savon vs Polugaevsky, 1971 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Whire wins with 34.Kg3 for it threatens 35.Re5x. I see two ways to thwart the mate. A) 34.. Nd4 with a view of interposing 35.. Nf5+. But this fails against 35.h4+ as the black king is forced into either f5 or h5, when respective moves 35.Re5/Rh7 are mates. B) 34.. Rf8, again ...
 
   Oct-30-19 O Bernstein vs Capablanca, 1914 (replies)
 
Skewbrow: Happy to figure out that 29...Qb2 wins (rather than going for the back rank immediately). The only defence I had to think about a bit was the counter 30.Rc8, threatening mate, pinning the black rook (and leaving c1 covered in the continuation 30...Rxc8 31.Qxb2). But then, with the ...
 
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