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Zvulon Gofshtein
Z Gofshtein 
 
Number of games in database: 1,238
Years covered: 1969 to 2015
Last FIDE rating: 2493 (2463 rapid, 2458 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2560

Overall record: +125 -77 =129 (57.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 907 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (84) 
    B90 B33 B78 B42 B43
 King's Indian (60) 
    E92 E97 E60 E81 E67
 Queen's Indian (38) 
    E12 E15 E17 E18 E16
 Queen's Gambit Declined (35) 
    D35 D31 D37 D30 D38
 English (32) 
    A15 A17 A10 A13 A16
 French Defense (32) 
    C11 C00 C10 C03 C15
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (118) 
    B40 B22 B43 B42 B47
 Queen's Pawn Game (74) 
    A41 A46 A40 A45 E00
 King's Indian (54) 
    E60 E94 E92 E97 E90
 Pirc (49) 
    B07 B09 B08
 Reti System (28) 
    A04 A05 A06
 Robatsch (26) 
    B06
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Z Gofshtein vs M Gurevich, 2001 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs A G Ashton, 2006 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs Tseitlin, 1991 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs Timoshenko, 1986 1-0
   Smirin vs Z Gofshtein, 1996 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Yerevan (1981)
   Hastings 2006/07 (2006)
   Israeli Championship (2004)
   Ukrainian Championship (1986)
   11th Essent Open (2007)
   Groningen Open (1993)
   46th URS-ch selection (1978)
   EUR-chT (Men) 10th (1992)
   Manila Olympiad (1992)
   Lisbon Open (2001)

RECENT GAMES:
   🏆 TCh-ISR
   Z Gofshtein vs Rozentalis (May-01-15) 1/2-1/2
   Z Gofshtein vs T Nabaty (Mar-20-15) 1-0
   M Roiz vs Z Gofshtein (Apr-14-13) 1-0
   Y Gruenfeld vs Z Gofshtein (Apr-13-13) 0-1
   Z Gofshtein vs Yair Judkovsky (Apr-12-13) 1/2-1/2

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ZVULON GOFSHTEIN
(born Apr-21-1953, died Dec-23-2015, 62 years old) Ukraine (federation/nationality Israel)

[what is this?]

GM Zuvlon Gofshtein was born in the Soviet Union as Leonid Davidovich Gofshtein.

Leonid Gofshtein (also known by his Hebrew name Zvulon Gofshtein Hebrew was an Israeli chess grandmaster. He emigrated from the Ukrainian SSR to Israel in 1990.

In 1999 he tied for 1st–5th with Mikhail Gurevich, Aleksandar Berelovich, Sergei Tiviakov and Rustam Kasimdzhanov in the open section of the Hoogeveen International tournament. In 2000 he came second in the Tel Aviv International tournament and tied for 2nd–6th with Roman Slobodjan, Ventzislav Inkiov, Giorgi Bagaturov and Stefan Djuric in the Arco Chess Festival. In 2004 he tied for 1st–3rd with Michael Roiz and Evgeniy Najer in the Ashdod Chess Festival. In 2006, tied for 2nd–5th with Slavko Cicak, José González García and Josep Manuel Lopez Martinez in the VIII Sants Open.

He played for Israel in the 30th Chess Olympiad in Manila 1992.7 On the May 2010 FIDE list his Elo rating was 2537.

Gofshtein's handle on the Internet Chess Club was "Orange". He died on 25 December 2015 after a long illness.

Wikipedia article: Leonid Gofshtein

Last updated: 2021-12-17 21:57:11

 page 1 of 50; games 1-25 of 1,237  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Z Gofshtein vs Beliavsky  0-1381969URS-chT U18A14 English
2. Z Gofshtein vs Romanishin  1-0661969BeltsyE11 Bogo-Indian Defense
3. Panchenko vs Z Gofshtein  ½-½491970VilniusC16 French, Winawer
4. Karpov vs Z Gofshtein  1-037197101, Rostov on Don ttA10 English
5. F Sideifzade vs Z Gofshtein  1-0421973SukhumiA60 Benoni Defense
6. Z Gofshtein vs A Buslaev  0-1681973SukhumiA04 Reti Opening
7. Z Gofshtein vs A I Tuzovsky  0-1601973SukhumiE00 Queen's Pawn Game
8. Z Gofshtein vs Mikhalchishin  1-0511976URS-ch YMA13 English
9. Z Gofshtein vs M Dvoretzky  ½-½181976URS-CupTE60 King's Indian Defense
10. Z Gofshtein vs Palatnik  0-1361976URS-ch YMA04 Reti Opening
11. Z Gofshtein vs A Khasin  1-0431976URS-ch otborD92 Grunfeld, 5.Bf4
12. V S Zhidkov vs Z Gofshtein  0-1321976URS-ch otborC05 French, Tarrasch
13. Sveshnikov vs Z Gofshtein  1-0371976URS-ch YMB47 Sicilian, Taimanov (Bastrikov) Variation
14. Z Gofshtein vs Kupreichik  1-0341976URSD78 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O c6
15. Makarichev vs Z Gofshtein  0-1511976URS-ch YMB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
16. Z Gofshtein vs T Giorgadze 0-1121976Ch URS ( select )A15 English
17. Z Gofshtein vs Anikaev  1-0341976URS-ch otborD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
18. Butnorius vs Z Gofshtein  1-0231976URS-ch otborB43 Sicilian, Kan, 5.Nc3
19. V Levchenkov vs Z Gofshtein ½-½431976URS-CupTB06 Robatsch
20. Sveshnikov vs Z Gofshtein  1-0431976URS-ch otborC02 French, Advance
21. Z Gofshtein vs L Zaid  1-0451976URS-ch otborE00 Queen's Pawn Game
22. Klovans vs Z Gofshtein  ½-½311976URS-ch otborB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
23. Panchenko vs Z Gofshtein  1-0271976URS-ch YMB06 Robatsch
24. Kupreichik vs Z Gofshtein  1-0301976URS-ch otborB06 Robatsch
25. Z Gofshtein vs Chekhov  0-1371977URS-ch YME60 King's Indian Defense
 page 1 of 50; games 1-25 of 1,237  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Gofshtein wins | Gofshtein loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-27-05  Knight13: Zvulon Gofshtein. Zvulon is his first name.
Aug-30-06  BIDMONFA: Z Gofshtein

GOFSHTEIN, Zvulon
http://www.bidmonfa.com/gofshtein_z...
_

Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Is this the same person as Leonid D Gofshtein?
Jul-30-08  eyalbd: for <chessgames.com> The names "Zvulun Gofshtein" and "Leonid Gofshtein" are two different names for the same person. Leonid Gofshtein changed his name to a Hebrew name ("Zvulun") after immigrated to Israel.
Feb-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: Did I write a bio on <Leonid D Gofshtein>? Anyway the postings there are gone now.
May-16-10  myschkin: . . .

<Lucky find> ?!

“In certain position, it is easy to find moves, because one’s choice is limited. In these types of positions, a club-player and a Grandmaster will pick the same moves. In other positions you have to choose between two or three approximately equal moves, and you have to reach a decision based on your style, your feeling your opponent. This is one of the hardest things in chess.” [B.G.]

Zvulon Gofshtein has quite a different approach to chess than Boris Gelfand. He states straight out that he is not the calculating type. That his analysis is frequently flawed and that his tactical ideas rest upon his strong intuition. He confesses that you cannot always play intuitively, that in some critical positions you must calculate, but that by and large playing by intuition is good. Gofshtein answers the questions of how far to calculate and when to stop as follows.

“When you feel that you position is good, that’s where calculation should end. You shouldn’t exert yourself unduly when effort is not required. This might cause harm.”

“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.

“Moreover, by investing extra effort, you lose strength that may be needed later on in the game.”

(takeouts from The Grandmaster's Mind by Amatzia Avni)

Aug-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: <“Moreover, by investing extra effort, you lose strength that may be needed later on in the game.” >

I think that was a fundamental problem in the Man vs. Machine contests. Beyond the inevitable time trouble, the GMs wasted their energy staring at obvious moves for a longgggggg time. I suspect now the competition is so one sided it doesn't matter.

Jan-03-16  Eastfrisian: He died on 23. December 2015 after long illness. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leoni... RIP GM Gofshtein
Jan-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: RIP to another opponent of long ago--we met in the Quebec Open blitz event at Montreal in summer 1997.

Although I lost both games--the first on time in a balanced position from a Taimanov Sicilian, the second after hanging my queen in a won position--he complimented my play.

While I have never read Avni's book, I consider Gofshtein's advice above an excellent, pragmatic approach. In particular, from the excerpt given by <myschkin>, this was long a failing in my play and tended to lead to chronic time shortage:

<“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.>

Jan-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: RIP to another opponent of long ago--we met in the Quebec Open blitz event at Montreal in summer 1997.

Although I lost both games--the first on time in a balanced position from a Taimanov Sicilian, the second after hanging my queen in a won position--he complimented my play.

While I have never read Avni's book, I consider Gofshtein's advice above an excellent, pragmatic approach. In particular, from the excerpt given by <myschkin>, this was long a failing in my play and tended to lead to chronic time shortage:

<“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.>

Apr-21-17  offramp: His adopted first name is a version of the biblical name Zebulon, a son of the patriarch Jacob.

He would have been 64 today.

Dec-01-18  ColdSong: Mr Gofshtein had what is needed not to be forgotten by receptive people.RIP Grandmaster.
May-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: I am surprised to find a GM of his generation I never heard of before. When did he get his GM title? His Wikipedia bio doesn't say. A quick Google search led me to the Wikipedia text in other places, and a couple pages in Hebrew that I can't read.
May-29-20  sultanmir: I just learned that he passed away in 2015. I had taken some chess lessons with him ~15 years ago. He was a kind man with a keen mind. I still remember his advice to me that we should avoid justifying our faults saying that it is our 'style' to play certain way or that we 'like' to take certain approach in game. He asked me to constantly question my style to see if it makes sense logically. From then on, I have been surprised to see how much we all justify our actions just because it fits our conception of our style - both in chess and in life. I am sad to hear that he passed away. May he rest in peace.

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