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Magnus Carlsen vs Anish Giri
Sinquefield Cup (2019), St Louis, MO USA, rd 1, Aug-17
English Opening: King's English. Four Knights Variation Botvinnik Line (A28)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Aug-17-19  wordfunph: this will be Magnus.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Magnus crushed Giri their last game: A Giri vs Carlsen, 2019

Giri will be out for blood!! j/k, he'll play for a draw.

Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <Check It Out: <Giri will be out for blood!! j/k, he'll play for a draw.>>

There's a difference?? ;)

Aug-17-19  rogge: Carlsen's in bad shape, Giri will get his draw :)
Aug-17-19  vonKrolock: Magnus is very good hearted, he let some pocket money from the raps and blitz for his friends...
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  WinKing: <vonKrolock: Magnus is very good hearted, he let some pocket money from the raps and blitz for his friends...>

lol...sure he did. ;)

Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Morning: Happy Saturday! Can't stay long, but will enjoy as much as possible. Considering that Giri recently lost to Carlsen as White in 23 moves, wondering what sort of mindset he has today.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Morning: 4.e4 is very old, and generally speaking the Bishop belongs on g2 and the Ng1 goes to e2. Wonder what Carlsen has in mind.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Morning: Nimzowitsch played 4.e4 in the mid-1920s, and here represents an example of him at his most loquacious--Nimzowitsch vs Saemisch, 1926.
Aug-17-19  Pedro Fernandez: Good morning! Better Giri takes the bishop, 9...a6 seems to me dubious.
Aug-17-19  vonKrolock: Good morning: 11...Nxf3 followed by 12...Bxe3 and Black looks in the way of equalization...
Aug-17-19  vonKrolock: But hardly someone would guess that this resulted from an English... Looks more like some 1.e4 e5 oddity
Aug-17-19  Pedro Fernandez: On the chessboard we see all the pawns but 3 minor figures already have been exchanged, a very uncommon case.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: This looks like--literally--elementary school chess, the sort my friends and I played when our ages still remained in single digits. Don't exchange pawns, swap off minor pieces, produce lifeless positions that someone would win thanks to an opponent's basic tactical blunder. Which explains why this position looks very *interesting* to me. When two Super-GMs play like this, they sometimes see things mere schoolchildren could not. Potentially intriguing: the advances d3-d4 and f2-f4.
Aug-17-19  Pedro Fernandez: White counts with more space but I don't like the knight at the boundary.
Aug-17-19  apexin: it wont be there for long. nc3 stopping ...d4 is a possibility
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Morning: Must go now. Hope you watch a game worth your time and attention.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: Remarkably complex position -- perhaps an immortal in the making.
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <An Englishman: Good Evening: This looks like--literally--elementary school chess, the sort my friends and I played when our ages still remained in single digits. Don't exchange pawns, swap off minor pieces, produce lifeless positions that someone would win thanks to an opponent's basic tactical blunder. Which explains why this position looks very *interesting* to me. When two Super-GMs play like this, they sometimes see things mere schoolchildren could not.>

What's the difference between simplicity and genius?

About 1300 rating points!

Aug-17-19  AdolfoAugusto: Doesn't feel right, too positional. At least I didn't expect Carlsen to play this way. Magnus, Boldly go and sac your daily pawn!
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: I guess they can't all be masterpieces...
Aug-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: White's 13. Qxe3 was disappointing. Carlsen was making a huge weapon out of the doubled pawns. 13. fxe3 would have strengthened the center (although the game was even then drawis). Maybe Magnus wanted to get a few draws under his belt to boost his confidence.
Aug-17-19  Atking: Or 20.exd cxd 21.Qc5 trying to unbalance... Alas Carlsen was in mood of his usual slow start. Especially vs Anish Giri whose forte is as safe balance game who some of us see as high drawish tendency Anyway for any opponent it is better to play Carlsen at the beginning that at the end of the tournament.
Aug-18-19  Ulhumbrus: 17...d5 opens lines in a position where White has a lead in development. This suggests 17...Qe7 first keeping the option of ...d5
Aug-18-19  Count Wedgemore: <Ulhumbrus> I think ...Qc7 might have been better than placing the queen on e7. I know that Black was eyeing the a3-pawn, but helping out on the queenside was perhaps a better option. In fact, if 17...Qe7, I think White could have tried 18.Qb6.
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