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Jan-Krzysztof Duda vs Grzegorz Gajewski
Bundesliga (2015/16), Dresden GER, rd 14, Apr-23
Sicilian Defense: Delayed Alapin (B50)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-29-16  Cedroke: Astonishing game. This just reminds me off that song haha "Everybody sing a song Duda Duda"
Mar-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: Good People = https://youtu.be/wj23_nDFSfE

Bad People = https://youtu.be/u-FhczpCZ84

28. g6! was an inspired Queen sacrifice (28 ... Rxh6 29. Bxh6), although it helped that White was four Pawns up already which evened things out. For the record, Fritz 10 did not give that move any punctuation. Note White spurned the three-fold repetition as 28. Qg7 would have been drawn on the spot. Then 30. c5! Rxc5 31. Bf8 was a clever sequence, exploiting the pin on the Bd6 (31 ... Nxg6 32. Bxd6) as otherwise the g Pawn Queens. Thus this contest became a highly unusual RRBB vs QRN situation but the outcome was never really in doubt, especially after White captured Black's last Pawn with 47. Rxe6.

For these longish games, we presume the gamescore is correct but that may not always be the case; 67. Kb2 Qe6 looks very suspicious. With that in mind, Fritz 10 suggested some shorter wins:

1) 44. Ra5+ Kb7 45. Rg1 Nh5

2) 45. Rh1 Qxf2 46. Rc5 Kb7 47. Rh7+ Kb8 48. Rb5+ Ka8

3) 55. a5 Qd3 56. Rcf2

4) 56. R7f6 Qd1

5) 68. Rd6+! Qxd6 69. c5+ Qxc5 70. bxc5+ Kc6 71. Bb3

The fifth one was pointed out by <scholes> featuring two consecutive royal forks:


click for larger view

68. Rd6+! Qxd6 69. c5+ wins. Now that move got punctuation.

Good game!

Sep-20-18  Saniyat24: What a beautiful position for Jan-Krzystof, when he plays 49.Bd5+...!
Jul-16-19  BxChess: Duda saw part Q trap was a dud
Nov-30-19  stacase: I got the first two moves. As always, how many of the following 49 moves are you supposed to get to claim, "I got it!" Well anyway, I'm happy to get the first two on a Saturday (-:
Nov-30-19  Cheapo by the Dozen: Finding the first two moves isn't hard, but the engine isn't too impressed with White's advantage at that point. (+1.35)
Nov-30-19  Walter Glattke: 29.-Rc8 30.cxb5 Nxg6 31.Rd3 Qxb5 32.Rxd6 Qxe2 (Nf4 e3!) 33.Bc2 (Rxe6 Qxe4+ and Qh1) Nf4 34.Bxf4 exf4 35.Rxe6 Rf8 36.Bd1 Qg2 -+
Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Well, White already has four extra pawns, so we end up with the odd equivalency of R & 4 vs. Q. Couldn't see the entire 50 move variation, but probably saw enough.
Nov-30-19  patzer2: In an actual game, I would probably have played 28. Qg7 = and settled for the draw by repetition after 28...Rhg8 29. Qh7 Rgh8 30. Qg7 etc.

However, with (28. ?) being a difficult Saturday puzzle, I figured it must involve a promising Queen sacrifice.

The best I could find was 28. c5!? which is a second best move that gives White an advantage after 28. c5!? Rxh6 29. cxd6! ⩲ to ± (+0.66 @ 32 ply, Stockfish 10).

Stronger of course is the game move and puzzle solution 28. g6! Rxh6 29. Bxh6 +- (+1.65 @ 34 ply, Stockfish 10).

Nov-30-19  TeaChess: Is 67 Kb2 a mistake? Black can take c4 pawn.
Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has the bishop pair and four pawns for a bishop and a knight.

Black threatens Rxh6.

The obvious 28.Qg7 leads 28... Rhg8 29.Qh7(6) Rh8 30.Qg7, repeating moves.

The alternative 28.g6 Rxh6 29.Bxh6, with the double threat Bxc8 and c5, looks good.

For example, 29... Rh8 30.Ag7 bxc4 31.Bxh8 Nxg6 32.Ba4 Qxa4 33.Rxd6 Nxh8 34.Rd8+ Kb7 35.Rxh8 and the h-pawn will run.

Or 29... Rc8 30.c5 Rxc5 31.Bf8 Rc6 32.g7 and Black looks lost with the queen tied down to the defense of d6 and e6 and the threats f4, Rd2-Rhd1, h4-h5, etc.

Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Surely 67...Qxc4 was called for.
Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Okay, <erad> pointed out the same thing 3 years ago.
Nov-30-19  schachfuchs: yes, 67...Qxc4 would have been =0.00 (47 ply)
e.g. 68.Rc3 Qf7 69.Rc5 Qf6+ 70.e5 Qf4 71.Ka3 Qc1+ 72.Kb3 Qd2 73.Bf5 Qd1+ 74.Kc3 Qa1+ 75.Kb3 Qd1+
Nov-30-19  rickgarel: Can someone please explain to me the weird chrisowen comment.
Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: I could but then l’d have to kill you.
Nov-30-19  King.Arthur.Brazil: I guess that White was tired when complementing the game after the 51th move. The easiest plan is to exchange the ♖ and win the final promoting the a5-8 ♙. See diagram. Therefore, instead of loosing time with 52.♖f7 I would play 52.♖a7 which would force this exchange. If black tries some desesperate sacrifice with 52... ♖xd5 53. exd5 ♕d3+ 54. ♖c2 ♕xd5 55. ♔b2 and White can either threat mate placing the last ♖ in h2 or g2, while the other in some place in the 7th rank, which make the black ♕ slave, while the "a" ♙ goes to promotion or checkmate. For example: 55... ♔b8 56. ♖h7 ♕f5 57. ♖ch2 ♕e6 58. a5 ♔a8 59. ♖g2 ♔b8 60. a6 ♕d5 61. ♖f2 ♕d6 62. ♖b7+ ♔c8 63. b5 ♕c5 64. ♖e2 ♕h5 65. ♖ee7 ♕h2+ 66. ♔b3 ♕h5 67. ♖bc7+ ♔b8 68. a7+ ♔a8 69. ♖c8#. If Black tried to keep the ♖, with 52...♖d6, the White could continue with: 53. a5 ♕d3+ 54. ♔b2 ♕e2+ 55. ♖c2 ♕d1 56. ♖g2 ♖d8 57. ♖a8+ ♔c7 58. ♖g7+ ♖d7 59. ♖a7+ ♔b8 60. ♖axd7 ♕d2+ 61. ♔b3 ♕d1+ 62. ♔c4 ♕e2+ 63. ♔c5 ♕f2+ 64. ♔b5 ♕f8 65. ♖b7+ ♔c8 66. ♗e6+ ♔d8 67. ♖b8#. Therefore, Black will have to accept the exchange... 52...♕d3+ 53. ♔b2 ♕d2+ 54. ♖c2 ♕d1 55. ♖a8+ ♔c7 56. ♖xd8 ♔xd8 57. ♗c6 ♕d6 58. b5 ♔c7 59. a5 ♕c5 60. ♔b3 ♕e5 61. ♖d2 ♕e6+ 62. ♖d5 ♔c8 63. a6 ♔b8 64. b6 ♕f7 65. a7+ ♕xa7 66. ♖d8# If 65... ♔c8 66.a8=♖#. Much more simple. Maybe DUDA is not so trained in the end-of-games.

Diagram:


click for larger view

Nov-30-19  RandomVisitor: The computer likes the trap-like 20.Qxf7!? because it can see ahead to the positional queen sacrifice, which favors white. At move 22 it see this far:


click for larger view

Stockfish_19111923_x64_modern:

<53/91 2:08:47 +2.79 22.d4 Ne7 23.Qxg7 Rhg8 24.Qh6 Rh8 25.dxe5 Rxh6> 26.exd6 Rh5 27.dxe7 Qxe7 28.f4 Kb7 29.g6 Qg7 30.Rdg1 Rd8 31.Be3 Rg8 32.Rg3 Qf6 33.Rhg1 a5 34.e5 Qe7 35.Rd1 Kc7 36.a3 Rhh8 37.Rf3 Rd8 38.Rg1 Rhg8 39.f5 exf5 40.Bg5 Rxg6 41.Bxe7 Rxg1+ 42.Ka2 Rd2 43.Bxc5 Rgg2 44.Bxf5 Kc6 45.Bd4 Rxb2+ 46.Ka1 Kd5 47.Bb1 Rbe2 48.Rf7 Re1 49.Ra7 a4 50.Rc7 Ke6 51.Rb7 Rh2 52.Rxb5 Rxh3

53/89 2:08:47 +2.23 22.Bb3 c4 23.dxc4 Ne7 24.Qxg7 Rfg8 25.Qf6 Rf8 26.c5 Rxf6 27.gxf6 Bxc5 28.Bg5 Qb7 29.fxe7 Bxe7 30.Bxe6 Qxe4+ 31.Ka1 Qxh1 32.Rxh1 Bxg5 33.Rg1 Bh6 34.f3 Kb8 35.Rd1 Bf4 36.Rd7 a6 37.a3 Bg5 38.Bg4 Rd8 39.Rg7 Bf4 40.Bd7 Rf8 41.Bc6 Rf6 42.Be4 Rh6 43.Rb7+ Kc8 44.Ra7 Kb8 45.Ra8+ Kc7 46.Ka2 Kb6 47.b4 Rxh3 48.a4 bxa4 49.Ka3 Rh1 50.Kxa4 Ra1+ 51.Kb3 Bc1 52.Kc2 Bf4 53.Kb2 Rc1 54.Bd3 Rh1 55.Rxa6+ Kc7 56.Kb3 Kb7

Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: This game reinforces the old adage "A man with two Zs in his name is always a strong chess player"

Here the man with 2 Zs in his second name outplayed the man with 2 Zs in his first name.

"ZZ Tops"

Nov-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Q: How do I submit a game of the day pun?

A: With Brazilian jiu-jitsu, of course!

Nov-30-19  brainzugzwang: I'm very confused at Move 67, kind of in line with the <tpstar> post above from 2 1/2 years ago. Why Kb2 for White, and even more, why doesn't Black reply Qxc4? Stockfish rates that position dead even, 0.00.
Nov-30-19  petemccabe: Camptown ladies sing this song, Duda, Duda.
Nov-30-19  RandomVisitor: "Duda queen sacrifice thing"
Nov-30-19  BxChess: I'm glad I'm not the only one who was puzzled by 67 Kb2 and the non-reply 67...Qxc4. In any case a good game by Duda. Lets make a toast.

Duda: Not a dud!

Nov-30-19  RandomVisitor: Move number 67 does not make sense for either player.

I suggest what was played: 66...Qf<4> 67.Kb2 Qe<5> 68.Rc3 Qf6 and we are back in line with the game. This playable move sequence does not allow the pawn grab 67...Qxc4 or the easy win for white 68.Rd6+. There are only two changes made to the score.

What do you think?

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