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Sergey Karjakin vs Viswanathan Anand
World Championship Candidates (2014), Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, rd 13, Mar-28
Queen's Gambit Declined: General (D30)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 12 OF 12 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-29-14  virginmind: Congratulations Anand for getting the re-match with Carlsen!
Mar-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Here's to the rematch of two great players and sportsmen!
Mar-29-14  amadeus: Congrats, Anand!
Mar-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: "If Anand can somehow pull a Botvinnik/Alekhine and win his return match against Carlsen..."

Remembering that neither Alekhine nor Botvinnik had to go through any qualifying rounds for a rematch. It would indeed be an incredible achievement. A first!

Mar-29-14  Marmot PFL: Tal was a sick man in the rematch, and Euwe was like Rocky, picked by Alekhine as an "easy" match rather than facing Capablanca again. Alekhine was rumored to be drinking heavily during the first match, although I don't know if that's true.
Mar-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Marmot PFL> I agree with you about Tal, but Botvinnik also won a return match against Smyslov. As for Euwe, Chessmetrics ranks him No. 3 in the world (after only Alekhine and Flohr) on the eve of the match. http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/...
Mar-29-14  Petrosianic: <Tal was a sick man in the rematch>

There's not really any evidence from his play to suggest that, as there was at Curacao. He won Bled later in the year. You might as well argue that in Bled/Zagreb/Belgrade, he was sick in the 4 games against Keres, and healthy in the others. His style had trouble against the hyper-positional players even at his peak, and he didn't get away with it twice.

<Alekhine was rumored to be drinking heavily during the first match, although I don't know if that's true.>

Euwe says no. In fact, Euwe also said that people thought Alekhine drank more than he actually did, he didn't wear his glasses more than he could help, and his walk was unsteady without them.

Euwe was picked as an easy match, but in fact he was a lot better in 1935 than anyone knew. If Alekhine had known how good, he would probably have picked someone else.

Mar-29-14  SetNoEscapeOn: <Sally Simpson: "If Anand can somehow pull a Botvinnik/Alekhine and win his return match against Carlsen..." Remembering that neither Alekhine nor Botvinnik had to go through any qualifying rounds for a rem>

Yes! Not even the mighty Karpov (who did qualify) could get it back.

Mar-29-14  Petrosianic: Getting the title back isn't a first. Requalifying isn't a first either. I guess in a way it would be a first to do both at more or less the same time. But two seconds doesn't make a first. (Or is it two wrongs don't make a right? I forget.)
Mar-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: "Euwe was picked as an easy match..."

I think Aekhine threw in the re-match clause with Euwe because he knew if Bogoljubov had taken his chances in the 1934 match...

Alekhine-Bogoljubov World Championship Rematch (1934)

....then Bogoljubov would have been world champion.

Alekhine knew he was a train wreck waiting to happen but needed the money these World Championship matches generated.

Mar-30-14  Caissanist: Tal himself did not say that he lost the Botvinnik rematch because of his health. He attributed it to Botvinnik's superior preparation, as quoted in the page for that match on this site.
Mar-30-14  fgh: <Caissanist: Tal himself did not say that he lost the Botvinnik rematch because of his health. He attributed it to Botvinnik's superior preparation, as quoted in the page for that match on this site.>

No doubt Tal was gentleman, but I've read that he had a heart attack during that match.

Mar-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: As Anand explained after it was over:

"Today was funny because for the whole tournament I was watching mainly Aronian because he was the closest, but then a few days ago I realised that both Karjakin and Svidler had the chance to beat me and win on the tiebreak. So even with a one-point lead the last two rounds were going to be very difficult. And that’s more or less what happened today. "

Mar-30-14  Petrosianic: <Caissanist>: <Tal himself did not say that he lost the Botvinnik rematch because of his health. He attributed it to Botvinnik's superior preparation, as quoted in the page for that match on this site.>

Not only preparation, but specifically Botvinnik's recuperative powers. His ability to look objectively at his defeats, determine what went wrong without making excuses, and prepare a remedy. Botvinnik had no answer for Tal's guerilla tactics in the first match. If you look at the second match, he did, just as Keres did in 1959. In 1961, it's Botvinnik's level that went up, not Tal's down.

Mar-30-14  ewan14: Tal was ill , but Botvinnik would not take the
word of Tal's doctors and wanted him examined by Moscow doctors
Mar-30-14  Jim Bartle: I believe Tal could have demanded the match be held in Riga but wasn't aware of the power he held as champion.
Mar-30-14  ewan14: Botvinnik wanted it played in Moscow

to '' replicate '' the conditions of the original match

Mar-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  devere: In order to win this ending White needed a target to attack, and that is why 35 f4! was essential.


click for larger view

If Anand tries this sort of ending against Carlsen he is unlikely to achieve a draw. Of course it is also possible that Anand will play even better in the match than in the candidates tournament.

Mar-30-14  visayanbraindoctor: <devere: If Anand tries this sort of ending against Carlsen he is unlikely to achieve a draw.> I think you are right. Carlsen tries to create and exploit every weakness possible and thoroughly plays out endings until there is nothing left to play for. The only recent player that this reminds me of is Fischer, and (maybe surprising to some) Korchnoi.

Anand is also one of the World Champions who have not exactly been famous for their endings; while Carlsen has already achieved legendary status as an endgame player (excluding difficult rook endings). If Anand repeatedly gets into these grind-out endings against Carlsen, I can already see another crush coming up.

I think the sure way to get into these prolonged endings for Anand is for him to play somewhat scared and passively in the opening and middlegame. He just has to collect himself psychologically and play with verve and confidence if he has to have any chance. (I sound like a broken recorder, having already said these even before the first Carlsen vs Anand WC match.)

Apr-01-14  vsiva1: well done anand. all critics against u are fools. u have once again proved that u are a legend. forget about recent wc match. now u are the no.1. in candidates. all the best for coming wc. once again prove that india is wc and origin of great chess.
Apr-03-14  Tiggler: <ewan14: Tal was ill , but Botvinnik would not take the word of Tal's doctors and wanted him examined by Moscow doctors>

Whence cometh this story, or should I say legend? Tal never said anything about it that I know of. And what exactly was the nature of this mystery ailment?

Whether true or not, it makes no difference. Human fortunes are unpredictable, and anything might befall Carlsen too, though I do not hope so.

If the Champion cannot or will not defend his title, he must relinquish it to the legitimate challenger.

Apr-03-14  Tiggler: <Petrosianic>:< In 1961, it's Botvinnik's level that went up, not Tal's down.>

I fully concur with this opinion. Botvinnik's career exemplified the ethos of hard work, research, and preparation, combined with talent, of course. He is at the top of my chess pantheon, along with his apostle Kasparov.

Sep-13-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Everett: <Petrosianic: Getting the title back isn't a first. Requalifying isn't a first either. I guess in a way it would be a first to do both at more or less the same time. But two seconds doesn't make a first. (Or is it two wrongs don't make a right? I forget.)>

Yes, to both qualify and then regain the WC is a significant achievement, whether its difficulty escapes others or not.

And it would be a first.

Nov-25-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Anand was irritated with Karjakin with pushing on in this game for so long:

<At the end of the game, once we finally agreed on a draw, I joked to Karjakin how badly I'd wanted to murder him a few minutes ago for putting through such awful agony.>

Nov-26-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: I remember that. He motioned as if to strangle him.
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