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Dmitry Andreikin vs Vladimir Kramnik
Russian Championship Superfinal (2013), Nizhny Novgorod RUS, rd 3, Oct-07
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. l'Hermet Variation (C67)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Oct-07-13  csmath: I wasn't watching the commentaries.

Kramnik's Dortmund loss was from lousy opening. Tal Memorial loss was with a blunder right after the opening (27th move) in a completely even position.

By now he should taken Andreikin very seriously (therefore Berlin) and yet again he gets snapped in the opening. And while he was persevering for 80 moves, he was quite fried early on.

Oct-07-13  john barleycorn: <csmath> so, what happened to Kramnik's "legendary" opening preparation? When playing Andreikin in particular?
Oct-07-13  csmath: I for one do not believe that Kramnik is remotely as prepared as he used to be.

Nowadays he is using his immense experience in knowledge of positions, we'll see how long is this going to serve him.

Oct-07-13  john barleycorn: < csmath: I for one do not believe that Kramnik is remotely as prepared as he used to be.> You should have mentioned this before....
Oct-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Everett: I doubt Kramnik prepares much in the Berlin nowadays. Maybe a little touch-up here and there while he is looking at other, newer material. I see that he is experimenting more in Benoni and KIA set-ups, giving up the center a bit more. Don't know in the long run how successful he will be with it.
Oct-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Everett: BTW, 36 White to play is a nice tactical move in a "simple" position. These tactics are very good to add to one's collections.
Oct-07-13  Maatalkko: <csmath: First of all, 36. b5! is a great move but it is not inhuman, as a matter of fact it is quite human move. Andreikin missed wins on 38th and 41st move as well (the same motives), read my comments. Those are also quite human moves.>

Mess you. You're full of trash. You see all these "quite human" moves when the machine spits them out and we all know it.

Oct-08-13  csmath: Try to be more civil, it won't hurt you.

The missed direct wins on 36th, 38th, and 41st moves are missed regardless. 36th is perhaps more tactical but 38th and 41st are not exactly hidden as the variation above shows.

When you do analysis obviously you should consult engine. I am not trying to pretend I found those motives using my fingers and toes. My comment is that these moves can be found over the board without consulting engine. To miss them all is possible but it is a failure of execution nevertheless.

Oct-08-13  Olavi: It's a bit harsh to call those 'missed wins', although the are much quicker. The rook ending that arises by force after 42.Rxg7 is such a clear win, barring miracles, that it's natural not to look any further. Any 3 vs. 1 on the kingside with 0 vs. 1 on the queenside is.
Oct-08-13  iamsheaf: 36. b5! is indeed a good move but I doubt too many players will find it right before the time control. It is indeed a very very human move in the sense that all pieces in black camp get paralyzed by this move.. it blocks the important d7 square from the black queen. For example, Qxb5 loses to Qxc2 ...

On the other hand, axb5 loses to Rd8+ Kf7 Qd7+ Kg6 Qg4+ and now Kh7 loses to Qf5+ g6 Qd7# and Kf7 loses to Rd7 Ke8 Qe6+ Kf8 Qf7#...

36..Rc7 allows b6 with a tempo and b7 to follow, the pawn is unstoppable, for example Rb7 Qc8+ wins the rook..

everything else loses just the same way following the same basic idea.

I think it is easier to spot combinations than these kind of subtle moves, they aren't too difficult once you notice the idea. I doubt if anybody would have found it 4 moves before the time control..

Oct-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <I am sheaf> thanks for posting the continuation after 36.b5 ab.
Oct-08-13  iamsheaf: <keypusher> important thing to note that 36. b5 axb5 37. Rd8+ Kf7 38. Rd7+? allows black to slip away for example after 38. Rd7+ Kg8 39. Qg6? now white gets mated by 39..Rc1+ 40. Kh2 Qf4+ 41. g3 Qxf2# and if 41. Qg3 Qxg3 black is a healthy pawn up maybe enough to win
Oct-08-13  Jim Bartle: From the Russian Superfinals page, posted right after Kramnik played 35...Qxa4:

<csmath: Kramnik just blundered a rook in already lost position thus this is over.

He can actually save the rook but cannot stop promotion. The only question is whether Andreikin sees that. But there are other ways to win as well. It is completely lost.>

Oct-08-13  csmath: <It's a bit harsh to call those 'missed wins', although the are much quicker. The rook ending that arises by force after 42.Rxg7 is such a clear win, barring miracles, that it's natural not to look any further.>

I am a titled player and I could not see that win during the game. Kramnik played further as well so I do not belive that is an "obvious" win. It became "obvious" to me only during analysis. I don't think Andreikin was sure about that because if he was then he would have not played 46th move the way he did. :-)

By the way I did not call those oversights "missed wins" but rather "missed direct wins" which is a distinction I made deliberately for a reason.

Also take a good look at 41st move and the comment above. Black loses queen to save himself from mate. I do not think that any good chess player would prefer to play rook ending when you can win the game in a 4-move "combination" like that which is relatively simple no matter how you slice it.

Oct-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <csmath> <I am a titled player and I could not see that win during the game. Kramnik played further as well so I do not belive that is an "obvious" win. It became "obvious" to me only during analysis.

By the way I did not call those oversights "missed wins" but rather "missed direct wins" which is a distinction I made deliberately for a reason.>

This all sounds reasonable to me. I am not a titled player (unless national master counts) and could not quickly see the win at move 42. Given my shortsightedness, 42.Rxg7 going into the rook ending would have been a safe, solid option. Of course, what I would do should not be a guide to what Andreikin would do, but all I am saying is that I sympathize.

Oct-08-13  csmath: <From the Russian Superfinals page, posted right after Kramnik played 35...Qxa4: <csmath: Kramnik just blundered a rook in already lost position thus this is over. He can actually save the rook but cannot stop promotion. The only question is whether Andreikin sees that. But there are other ways to win as well. It is completely lost.>>

Correct but Andreikin missed those direct wins as well. He eventually went for rook's ending. Andreikin missed three direct wins between moves 36 and 41.

The discussin about rook's ending is about position after 42nd move. Is this too hard to follow for you?

Oct-08-13  csmath: I do not believe Andreikin saw the win immediate in rook's ending after 42nd move. The simple reason is that he wasted time (he spent time thinking) for his 46th move which was a waste and then on 47th move he made correct progress.

If he knew exactly how to win that rooks ending that he would have made 46.Rh7 but he did not.

I think he only made 47.Rh7 after Kramnik played 46. ..Kf8 which was an indication to him what he must do.

These are nuances I know but they are there for you to see. :-)

As a matter of fact I believe that Kramnik is a superior ending player than Andreikin but in this particular ending he could really do nothing.

Oct-08-13  Olavi: Yes, Andreikin's 46th was strange, but all 3 vs. 1+1 (or 4 vs 1+2) positions are normal theoretical technical wins. There are classic examples of that. You don't need to 'see' the win, you know it's there. As for the miss on the 41st move, I can only guess that Andreikin simply stopped after calculating the game until 45.Kxg3. He knew that to be an easy win.
Oct-08-13  Jim Bartle: Csmath, as you present yourself as an expert and titled player, (I repeat) you really should post a bio. You don't have to reveal your name, but you should present your experience.
Oct-08-13  Olavi: In fact, a quick glance suggests that 46.Rb7 Kf8 (Kd8 47.Rf7) 47.Rh7 is 'better' than 46.Rh7. The black king is nearer the kingside, which makes the position more schematic, there's not even the (admittedly unimportant) randomizing factor of the bK making for the queenside.
Oct-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: I second <JB>.
Oct-08-13  csmath: <Yes, Andreikin's 46th was strange, but all 3 vs. 1+1 (or 4 vs 1+2) positions are normal theoretical technical wins.>

I doubt. Depends on the position. Here in particular black rook was poorly placed in front of his own pawn. That was decisive disadvantage. Had that rook been behind his pawn the story would have been quite different.

I played a lot of rook's ending pawn up or down and I generally would not be able to claim anything without analysing except in known theoretical positions.

The key to success in this particular position was to capture h-pawn. This was actually obvious to me during the game and clearly it was obvious to Kramnik before it became obvious to Andreikin.

Why he could not see the direct win in 41st move when he had enough time, I don't know. You can speculate but regardless of the conclusion that is a temporary failure of execution.

Oct-08-13  Olavi: If the black rook was behind his pawn then would be discussing a completely different category of ending. That difference is such a huge one, take for instance the sixth game of the first Karpov-Kasparov match, which Karpov won with even pawns, because his rook was behind his pawn.
Oct-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark:

The walls of Berlin
are all
about to fall.

Oct-09-13  Ulhumbrus: Andreikin breaches Kramnik's Berlin wall by employing the Magdeberg attack 6 de Nxb5 7 a4.

On 36 b5!! (as pointed out by several kibitzers here) 36...axb5 the black queen's defence of the d7 square is obstructed, and one way for Black to lose is 37 Rd8+ Kf7 38 Qd7+ Kg6 39 Qd3+ Kf7 40 Rd7+ Kg8 41 Qg3! g5 42 Qb8+ Rc8 43 Qxc8 mate

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