chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Vladimir Kramnik vs Peter Leko
Amber Tournament (Blindfold) (2009) (blindfold), Nice FRA, rd 11, Mar-26
Semi-Slav Defense: Anti-Moscow Gambit (D44)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 116 more Kramnik/Leko games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Games that have been used in game collections will have a section at the bottom which shows collections which include it. For more information, see "What are Game Collections?" on our Help Page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-26-09  notyetagm: A *masterful* game by Kramnik, the best played game I have seen all tournament.

23 f2-f4! 36 e5-e6! EXPLOIT EVERY PIN!

Mar-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  ClassZPlaya: A possible conclusion is 36. ... Re7 37. exf7 Rg7 38. Nf5! (38. ... Rgxf7 39. Qh8 Mate; or 38. ... Rexf7 39. Qd8 mate)
Mar-26-09  thom: <Vladimir Kramnik started the day with a crushing victory over Peter Leko in the blindfold game. In fact he used quite an important novelty to score this win. ‘I decided to use it as I am still fighting for the top places,’ the Russian grandmaster said. He had analysed it a long time ago, before the San Luis World Championship Tournament, and might have used it for his match against Anand. Fortunately for him he didn’t analyze it during that match as in that case he could not have used it to surprise his former second Leko. In fact Kramnik had already played it in a blitz game, but as that game was published in a corrupted way it must have escaped his colleagues’ attention. The new move was 15.Re1, which according to Kramnik ‘opens a new field for analysis’. Leko reacted in ‘the most natural manner’, but couldn’t prevent that, facing such problems in a blindfold game, he ended up in a lost position. After 27.Ne2 Kramnik saw no defence for Black. His home preparation ended with move 28.Ng3.> http://www.amberchess2009.com/Round...
Mar-26-09  acirce: <The new move was 15.Re1 [...] His home preparation ended with move 28.Ng3.> I just love this.

He was 24 minutes ahead on the clock at one or two occasions. Not that bad when you start with 25 minutes each.

Mar-26-09  Eyal: <In fact Kramnik had already played it in a blitz game, but as that game was published in a corrupted way it must have escaped his colleagues' attention. The new move was 15.Re1, which according to Kramnik "opens a new field for analysis">

That blitz game with the corrupted score (a bizarre 18.Nd5 followed by a draw) is Kramnik vs Shirov, 2007.

<His home preparation ended with move 28.Ng3.>

According to Rybka, that's exactly where Leko (who was, understandably, in serious time trouble by this stage) made the decisive mistake with 28...c5? - 28...Qg6 might still hold, or at least allow Black to put up much better resistance - though according to Kramnik that shouldn't help either.

Mar-26-09  OneArmedScissor: Kramnik is amazing.
Mar-26-09  Eyal: It seems that Kramnik studied this variation in great depth and has several tricks lined up - in the well-known Kramnik vs Aronian, 2008 he played 15.Bg4 instead of Re1, and produced a strong novelty on move 25...
Mar-27-09  acirce: It's probably not the most original of ideas, but maybe he should have played 5.Bg5 in Bonn.........
Mar-27-09  shintaro go: Despite all the crap thrown at Kramnik, he still can demolish top players at will.
Mar-27-09  KamikazeAttack: <shintaro go: Despite all the crap thrown at Kramnik, he still can demolish top players at will.>

Demolish? Yes
At will? No way Hose.

No SGM can demolish the other at will.

Mar-27-09  donehung: Id have to agree with notyetagm this game is an amazing demonstration of blindfold.
Mar-27-09  notyetagm: <acirce: ...He was 24 minutes ahead on the clock at one or two occasions. Not that bad when you start with 25 minutes each.>

Damn.

The benefits of hard work.

Mar-27-09  notyetagm: <acirce: It's probably not the most original of ideas, but maybe he should have played 5.Bg5 in Bonn.........>

Any idea why he didn't? Especially after Anand crushed his Meran in Games 3 and 5?

Mar-27-09  Eyal: <After> games 3&5 Kramnik didn't have the chance to go for the Anti-Moscow anymore, because Anand played 4...dxc4 in game 8 and Nimzo-Indian in game 10 (which turned out very well for Kramnik). In retrospect, he might well regret not trying 5.Bg5 instead of e3 in those two crucial games... but of course Anand might have met that as well with some of his own mega-prep.
Mar-28-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: I read in an interview with Kramnik that he used to play as many as 25 simultaneous games of blindfold chess, while in high school.

I guess he's pretty good at this variation of chess.

Mar-28-09  Woody Wood Pusher: This is a very impressive game.

After

36...Re7 37.Nf5 Rg6 38.Qxe7+ Kg8 39.exf7+ Kh8 40.f8=Q+,Rg8 41.Qg7 mate

36...Rg6 37.exd8 Rxf6 38.d8=Q+ Kg7 39.Ne8 + Kf8 40.Nxf6+ Kg7 41.Nh5+ Kg6 42.g4 Kh7 43.Qxg5 Δ 44.Qg7 mate

If only Kramnik played like this this more often...

Mar-28-09  Hesam7: <Eyal: <After> games 3&5 Kramnik didn't have the chance to go for the Anti-Moscow anymore, because Anand played 4...dxc4 in game 8 and Nimzo-Indian in game 10 (which turned out very well for Kramnik). In retrospect, he might well regret not trying 5.Bg5 instead of e3 in those two crucial games... but of course Anand might have met that as well with some of his own mega-prep.>

I think the thing he should regret the most is playing the exchange slav in game 1. I think there is a better chance to recover from a -2 score when you have 9 games to play than when you have only 7.

<Eyal: According to Rybka, that's exactly where Leko (who was, understandably, in serious time trouble by this stage) made the decisive mistake with 28...c5? - 28...Qg6 might still hold, or at least allow Black to put up much better resistance - though according to Kramnik that shouldn't help either.>

Can you run Rybka after 28...Qg6 to see what the win was?

Mar-28-09  Eyal: <Hesam7> I was going by Chessok's Rybka (http://chessok.com/broadcast/?key=A...) which actually gives White only +0.10 after 28...Qg6; it's Kramnik who according to the round report quoted above says that Black has "no defence" after 27.Ne2. I suppose White plays 29.Qe2 followed by e5, with ideas such as Rf6, Ne4/f5-d6 - it certainly looks very unpleasant for Black.
Mar-28-09  Hesam7: <Eyal> I understood that Rybka and Kramnik disagreed. I just thought that given enough time Rybka would change her mind.

<Eyal: I suppose White plays 29.Qe2 followed by e5, with ideas such as Rf6, Ne4/f5-d6 - it certainly looks very unpleasant for Black.>

That looks very strong actually.

Mar-28-09  andrewleef1: e6! is a nice move by drawnik
Mar-29-09  notyetagm: <Woody Wood Pusher: This is a very impressive game.>

It was.

On the other hand it was almost *entirely* home preparation. Much like the brilliant Sokolov-Aronian form the 2006 Turin Olympiad, which *was* entirely prep from Aronian.

Mar-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kamalakanta: <notyetagm: A *masterful* game by Kramnik, the best played game I have seen all tournament.

23 f2-f4! 36 e5-e6! EXPLOIT EVERY PIN!>

Famous line from a famous song: "Climb every mountain, exploit every pin!" :-)

Mar-29-09  notyetagm: <kamalakanta: <notyetagm: A *masterful* game by Kramnik, the best played game I have seen all tournament.

23 f2-f4! 36 e5-e6! <<<EXPLOIT EVERY PIN!>>>>

Famous line from a famous song: "Climb every mountain, <<<exploit every pin!>>>" :-)>

Indeed Master Chris Desmarais told me that this is one of the major focuses of the Russian school of chess, the creation and exploitation of <PINS>.

Mar-29-09  slomarko: Kramnik is the strongest player in the world when he can spend 80 or 90% of the game in his home prep.
Mar-29-09  notyetagm: <slomarko: Kramnik is the strongest player in the world when he can spend 80 or 90% of the game in his home prep.>

Good thing that Anand's prep was better than Kramnik's at Bonn then. :-)

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: BLINDFOLD. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Pins! Exploit every pin!!!
by trh6upsz
Moscow Gambit 9.Be2 Bb7 10.0-0 Nbd7 11.Ne5 Bg7 12.Nxd7
from Semi-Slav 5.Bg5 by KingG
PINS AGAINST UNDEFENDED PIECES (UPMP)
by notyetagm
Book of Five Rings' favorite games 4
by Book of Five Rings
Game 37 in Move by Move - Kramnik by Cyrus Lakdawala
from Published Games by Year and Unconfirmed Source 7 by fredthebear
36 e5-e6!
from PINS AGAINST THE KING by notyetagm
Game 37 in Move by Move - Kramnik by Cyrus Lakdawala
from Vladi Kramn'd Fredthebear Full of White Russian by fredthebear
Game 37
from Move by Move - Kramnik (Lakdawala) by Insession52
Game 37
from Move by Move - Kramnik (Lakdawala) by Qindarka
Game 1050
from # Chess Informant Best Games. 1001-1100 by Qindarka
Pins! Exploit every pin!!!
by Miguel Medina
Pins
from Tactics by unonning
koinonia's favorite games
by koinonia

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC