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Humpy Koneru vs Julio Ernesto Granda Zuniga
Ruy Lopez Chess Festival (2008), Merida ESP, rd 3, Apr-07
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Classical Variation. Keres Defense (E32)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-18-11  UnsoundHero: I like calling the technique of rook-check on the 8th rank the "back-rank spank".
Jul-18-11  cocker: Mondays give us hope again.
Jul-18-11  UnsoundHero: The most classic "spank" of all time occurred in the notes to the Robert Byrne - Fischer game from the 1963 US Championship:

R Byrne vs Fischer, 1963

After black's 21st move, white resigned with dignity, rather than allow Bobby to spank him with 22.Qf2 Qh3+ 23.Kg1 Re1+!! 24.Rxe1 Bxd4 with mate to follow shortly."

Jul-18-11  morfishine: Ouch. Either chess blindness or simply moving too fast or a combination of the two
Jul-18-11  newzild: Good to see chessgames.com moving away from the Queen-sac Monday idea. A bit of variety is good.
Jul-18-11  Patriot: I've seen this pattern many times on the "Chess Tactics Server" so spotting this was instantaneous.

If black was able to play 24...Kg7 it no longer works since the a8-rook is defended. If not for the d5-bishop then 25.Qxb6 Rxb6 26.Rxa8 wins a rook. That's a variation of the same theme.

Jul-18-11  LIFE Master AJ: Got it.

22...QxP/b6??; was maybe the worst GM move I have seen in a long, long time. (Fritz liked 22...Qd6; its evals shows that Black is prolly better.)

Jul-18-11  Fuegoverde: 23 Rc8+ Rxc8 forced, and white takes the black Queen
Jul-18-11  stst: No "sudden death," but the Q will go!
23.Rc8+
IF (A) 23..... RxR, 24.QxQ
IF (B) 23..... Qd8, 24.RxQ
and Bk can still linger on, yet not much counter play with weaker pieces...
Jul-18-11  psmith: <dzechiel> etc.
Not to get all pedantic on you, but...

It is not correct to say that Black has no legal move other than 23... Rxc8 after 23. Rc8+.

Actually there is another way to lose the Queen -- see <kasp>'s comment above.

Jul-18-11  stst: Looking back, quite curious why Bk play
22... Qxb6 where a more durable fight of Q taking a back seat @d8 would not hang up that fast... maybe s/he didn't want a long grill by this P.
Jul-18-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: 23 ♖c8+ is the kind of tactic seen in primers. Black must take and abandon the queen-and the lady is lost.
Jul-18-11  Winston Smith: I wish my name was Humpy.
Jul-18-11  sevenseaman: < Winston Smith: I wish my name was Humpy.> A classy tribute to the young lady and a budding GM.
Jul-18-11  BOSTER: <FSR> <The term (Amaurosis Scacchistica) was coined by S.Tarrasch>. Hi, FSR. I want ask you the question,concerning chess blindness. Once GM Andy Soltis claims, that if you don't see a tactics immediately you would not see it at all. What is your opinion?
Jul-18-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has the bishop pair for a bishop and a knight.

Black threatens 23... Qxb5 24.Bxb5 Rxb5.

The rook on b8 is overburdened (defends the queen and the back rank). Therefore, 23.Rc8+:

A) 23... Rxc8 24.Qxb6 + -.

B) 23... Qd8 24.Rxd8+ + -.

Jul-18-11  MaczynskiPratten: The usual Monday queen sac, but we sac opponent's Q rather than our own.
Jul-18-11  Patriot: <BOSTER> <Hi, FSR. I want ask you the question,concerning chess blindness. Once GM Andy Soltis claims, that if you don't see a tactics immediately you would not see it at all. What is your opinion?>

I hope you don't mind my response since your question is directed at <FSR>? I don't really know what Soltis claimed but I think there is a lot of truth in that statement. How quickly you recognize basic tactics is extremely important. For example if this takes 30 seconds to "figure out", it will be even more difficult to see it defensively as black when considering 22...Qxb6. If it takes only 1 or 2 seconds to see it as white, it will take maybe slightly more time as black but not even close to 30 seconds. The speed by which you see a basic tactic becomes even more important when looking further ahead. Knowing a tactic is better than figuring one out. But tactics aren't everything. It also takes a good thought process to cover the things we don't recognize.

Jul-18-11  BOSTER: <Patriot> <I don't know what Soltis claimed ,but i think there is a lot of truth in that statement>. Thanks for an answer.
But if this is a truth, how you explain this.

Maybe you have heard about Plaskett's Puzzle , when Jim Plaskett showed a remarkable problem which nobody was able to solve.(It was during tour in 1987). M.Tal, who looked at it for 10 minutes,then left the room and suddenly popped it again in hour later. Apparently he had worked out the main idea walking in the park.

Jul-18-11  WhiteRook48: 23 Rc8+ Rxc8 24 Qxb6 obvious
I love monday puzzles
Jul-18-11  TheFocus: One second. Half a second to find the move. Anther half second spent giggling.
Jul-18-11  Patriot: <BOSTER> Good question. I believe the answer is that basic tactics are like the A-B-C's of combinations. Difficult combinations still require formulating words and sentences. I believe it takes a good thought process and visualization to accomplish this for starters. Here's a position my coach showed me recently, with black to play:


click for larger view

He pointed out that white has the opposition and the more advanced passed pawn. He said "Would you evaluate this as winning for white?" I said "With positions like this I would have to calculate before knowing the evaluation." I told him there are only two moves to consider for black: 1...h5 or 1...Ke6. It turns out that 1...Ke6 wins, while 1...h5 draws. Later in the analysis, it was easier to calculate because I knew the "trebuchet position" and another position where the b- and h-pawns disappear and white takes on f5. It was easy to see it as a draw because black steps onto f7. My point is that it still took calculation, but basic tactics made it easier to finish.

Jul-18-11  Dr. J: Is Black necessarily lost before the horrible 22...Qxb6?? If 22..Qd6, White has a tough time defending b6, a3, and c3.


click for larger view

Might Black even have an advantage?

Jul-18-11  TheBish: Koneru vs Granda-Zuniga, 2008

White to play (23.?) "Very Easy"

I saw another tactic like this earlier today.

23. Rc8+! Rxc8 (or 23...Qd8 24. Rxd8+ is the same) 24. Qxb6 wins a queen for a rook. I'm sure Black resigned on the spot after the rook check.

Jul-19-11  TheBish: Black resigned before White had a chance to play it! I was wondering if that was the case. Not too many masters would miss a shot like that!
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