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Kim Commons vs Boris Baczynskyj
"Kim Possible" (game of the day Jan-13-2018)
Lone Pine (1976), Lone Pine, CA USA, rd 3, Mar-09
Queen's Indian Defense: Spassky System (E14)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-07-18  Steve.Patzer: Oops, I tried 27. Ng8+
Apr-07-18  ChessHigherCat: Excellent attack! Here's another famous game from his grudge match against Pet Peev:

K Commons vs P Peev, 1976

Apr-07-18  yadasampati: I had 27. d5 and that is enough to make me happy :-)
Apr-07-18  WorstPlayerEver: Puzzled here... SF gives this completely weird line:

+3.80 (39 ply) 27. d5 cxd5 28. Ng8+ Ke8 29. Qxe6+ Ne7 30. Nxe7 Qb1+ 31. Rf1 Qxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Rxf4+ 33. Ke1 Re4+ 34. Qxe4 dxe4 35. c6 Ba6 36. Nd5 Rf1+ 37. Kd2 Bg5+ 38. Kc2 Bc4 39. c7 Rf2+ 40. Kc3 Ba6 41. h4 Bf6+ 42. Nxf6+ Rxf6 43. Kd4 Bb7 44. h5 Rf7 45. Rxf7 Kxf7 46. g4 Kf6 47. Bc1 Ke6 48. g5 Kf5 49. g6 Kf6 50. Bg5+ Kg7 51. Ke5 a5 52. Kf5 Bc8+ 53. Kxe4 axb4 54. axb4 b5 55. Kf4 Bb7 56. Ke5 Bc8 57. Bf6+ Kh6 58. g7 Kh7 59. h6

But after -30. c6 it's mate in 12...

Mate-in-13 (24 ply) 30. c6 Qb1+ 31. Rf1 Qxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Ba6+ 33. Kg1 Rxh7 34. Qd7+ Kf7 35. Qxf5+ Ke8 36. Qd7+ Kf7 37. Qxe7+ Kg6 38. Qe6+ Kh5 39. Nf6+ Rxf6 40. Qe5+ Kg6 41. Qxf6+ Kh5 42. Qg5#

Apr-07-18  nisharaj31: I second what yadasampati had to say.
Apr-07-18  malt: 27.d5 cd5 28.Q:f5 Q:b2
(28...ef5 29.Re3# )
29.N:d5+ B:d5 30.R:f7+ Ke8 31.R:f8+ Kd7 32.Qh7+ Kc6 33.R:d8

27.d5 Qb1+ 28.Rf1 Q:b2 29.d6+ N:d6 30.cd6+ K:d6 31.Re1+ Kc7 (31...Ke5 32.Qf5# ) 32.R:f7+ R:f7 33.Q:f7+ Kc8 34.R:d8+ K:d8 35.Qd7#

27.d5 Bc7 28.d6+ B:d6 29.cd6 N:d6 30.Be5

Apr-07-18  Mayankk: I had the 27 Ng8 Ke8 idea although I was still wondering if it is necessary to add another piece to the Attack. The fact that Ke8 seemed the only reasonable reply after it, since Kd7 loses a Rook made this an easy choice.

Lots of complex sidelines and I couldn’t think much beyond Qxe6+, where Black has 3 pieces to interpose in between. As it turns out, it was all in the vain as d5 and a firing Bishop was indeed necessary...

Apr-07-18  Whitehat1963: What happens if 27. Qxf5?
Apr-07-18  landshark: I found the first move 27.d5, cxd5, and chose 28. Qxf5 with many amazing possibilities but which all seem to still favor White. I wonder how well it would hold up to serious scrutiny - ?
Apr-07-18  landshark: One line being 28. Qxf5 Rxh7 29. Qxh7+ Rf7 30. Ng8+ Kf8 31. Qh6+, where Black cannot take the N on g8 because of Qh8#. And that's just the starting point...
Apr-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has three pawns for a bishop.

Black threatens Qxb2.

The first idea that came to mind was 27.Qxf5 exf5 28.Re3+ Kxf6 29.d5+ Qxb2 30.Re6#. However, Black can play 29... Kg6.

This suggests 27.d5. For example, 27... Qxb2 28.dxe6 Kxe6 29.Re3+ Nxe3 30.Qe4+ Kxf6 31.Rh6+ Kg7 32.Qg6#. I haven't found the time for more.

Apr-08-18  Cheapo by the Dozen: What <al wazir> said.

I didn't appreciate Kim properly when I knew him.

Apr-08-18  Howard: You knew Commons, personally?
Jul-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  drollere: white has the opportunity of the open g and h files and the annoyance of pawn clutter in the middle board. after exploring the opportunity without success, i defaulted to cut the clutter with 22. e4. after 22. .. dxe4 23. Nxe4 white has the d5 push to free the B and d6 or f6 bring the N into the attack.
Jul-03-21  Walter Glattke: 22.e4 A) 22.-Ne7? 23.Rh8+ Ng8 24.Rxg8+ Ke7 25.e5 wins B) 22.-Ke7 23.exf5 Bc7 wins C) 22.-dxe4 23.Nxe4 Rg7 24.Rh8+ Ke7 25.Rxe8+ Qxe8 (26.Qxf6+ Kd7 27.Qe5 allows counter attack by 27.-Rxg2+ 28.Kxg2 Qg6+29.Rg3 Nxg3 30.hxg3 Bc7 31.Qg5 Qxe4+) 26.Qxe8+ Kxe8 27. Nxf6+ 2 pawns D) 22.-Rg7? 23.Rh8+ Ke7 24.Rxe8+ Qxe8 25.Qxe8+ Kxe8 26.exf5 2 pawns So, "glattfish 8" -2.23 or -2.03 after 22.e4
Jul-03-21  Cheapo by the Dozen: To answer <Howard>'s question of a few years ago, Kim and I were at UCLA at the same time. So was Diane Savereide. That was the setting of my story of teaming with her to beat Kim and expert Roy Ervin in a game of Double Bughouse, which we called Siamese Chess back then, on that coast. The other team was far better at regular chess, but Diane and I understood Siamese's peculiarities better than they did. Kim is by far the best player I ever beat in any form of chess whatsoever.
Jul-03-21  Cheapo by the Dozen: Yikes. Roy died young too!!

Roy C Ervin

Jul-03-21  mel gibson: I didn't see that.

Stockfish 13 says:

22. e4

(22. e4 (e3-e4 ♖f7-g7 ♖h3-h8+ ♔f8-e7 e4xf5 ♖g7xg6 ♖h8-h7+ ♔e7-f8 ♖h7xd7 ♖g6-g7 f5xe6 ♖g7xd7 e6xd7 ♖e8-e7 a3-a4 ♖e7xd7 b4-b5 ♔f8-f7 ♗b2-a3 ♖d7-e7 ♖f3-h3 ♔f7-g7 ♔g1-f2 ♖e7-e8 ♖h3-e3 ♖e8xe3 ♔f2xe3 ♗d8-c7 ♘d2-f3 ♔g7-f7 ♗a3-b4 ♗c7-d8 h2-h3 ♗d8-e7 f4-f5 a7-a5 ♗b4-a3 c6xb5 a4xb5 ♗b7-c8 ♘f3-h4 ♗e7-f8 ♔e3-f3 ♗c8-d7 ♘h4-g6 b6xc5 b5-b6 ♗d7xf5 ♘g6xf8 ♔f7xf8 d4xc5 ♗f5-e4+ ♔f3-f2 a5-a4 b6-b7) +4.11/49 1359)

score for White +4.11 depth 49.

Jul-03-21  Brenin: Kim Commons had a spectacular but regrettably short chess career. No doubt trying to do West Coast real estate deals while playing chess in Bulgaria was not a sustainable way of life.
Jul-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Tabitha ivories tinkles agains hathaway q pe4 fickle its abridge i keysong valour axled its good i keysong tabitha viktor bath its hq decreed its cruels i keysong losing its ok i keysong pings its whiff foe its yum i keysong z its orchids i keysong gethsemane lovely i keyson frugal its wait ok i keyson Ke7 etcetera its an oomph Nf5 honour its abridge log its ok i keysong vivacious totadd clocks aisled it i be proofs i keysong flicks muff its noted it pugsley cracks bubble feed its fudge its pe4 beauty?
Jul-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Fly zip I pe4 no?
Jul-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Rainbow over no?
Jul-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has two pawns for a bishop.

White's light pieces are out of play at the moment. This suggests 22.e4 (22.Rh8+ Ke7 23.Qxf7+ Kxf7 24.Rh7+ is met with 24... Ng7 and 23.Rh7 with 23... Ref8) with the idea 22... dxe4 23.d5 exf3 24.d6 Nxd6 25.cxd6 Qxd6 26.Rh8+ Ke7 27.Bxf6+ Kd7 (27... Rxf6 28.Qxe8#) 28.Qxf7+ Re7 29.Bxe7 although this line is not forced.

Jul-04-21  Brenin: <agb2002>: After 22 e4 dxe4 23 d5, Black can ignore the R on f3 and play exd5, leaving him a piece ahead and with e6 as an escape square for his K if White tries 24 Rh8+ Ke7 25 Qxf7+ Kxf7 26 Rh7+ or 25 Bxf6+ Rxf6 26 Rh7+.
Jul-04-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Brenin: <agb2002>>

I saw 22.e4 dxe4 23.Nxe4 Qd5 24.Nd6 Nxd6 25.cxd6 Qxd6 26.d5 but for some reason had the impression that the black king could escape when actually Black is completely lost. Both 26... Qxd5 27.Rh8+ Ke7 28.Bxf6+ and 26... Ke7 27.Bxf6+ win decisive material.

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