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Igors Rausis vs Matthew Sadler
Enghien-les-Bains 3rd (1999), Enghien-les-Bains FRA, rd 1, Mar-03
Queen's Gambit Accepted: Classical Defense. Main Lines (D27)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 16 times; par: 63 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-08-09  Terry McCracken: <UnsoundHero: I think black's winning by force after the brave 32...g3. The main point is to open the h-file, and to shut-out white's dark-square bishop from defense of h2. Play might run 33 hxg3 Qg5 34 Qc4 Qh5 35 f3 Bxf3 36 Qf1 Be2 37 Qe1 f4 (Amazing how black keeps on sacrificing pawns to expose white's king some more). 38 exf4 exf4 39 Rc3 f3! and g2 is too sensitive of a square for white.>

32.. g3 33. hxg3 Qg5 34. Qc4 Qh5 35. f3 Bxf3 36. Qf1 Be2 37. Qe1 f4 38. exf4 Qh2+ 39. Kf2 exf4 40. Rc3..Rf6 41. Qb1+ Rg6 42. Qe4 f3 43. Rxf3 Bxf3 44. Qxf3 Qh6 45. Qd3 Kg8=

Feb-08-09  MostlyAverageJoe: <UnsoundHero>

After 39 Rc3 f3


click for larger view

white plays 40.Qb1+! and black QR battery gets dismantled. No forced win.

Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Another fine example for Game Collection: 13_-> Middlegames with opposite-coloured Bitches

Don't open the cage door!!!

Feb-08-09  UnsoundHero: On 25 Bxa6 Bxa6 26 Qxe4 Bb7 27 Qc2 e5, Black has the initiative and attacking chances for a pawn. His Bb7 can't be challenged by white's bishop. White has some weak squares on the queenside and central files.

Still, it's nerve-racking to sac a pawn like this in a real live tournament game.

Feb-08-09  DarthStapler: I didn't get it
Feb-08-09  Samagonka: ...neither did I.
Feb-08-09  Dr. J: After the game continuation <32 ... g3 33 fxg3(?) Qg5> what's wrong with 34 Re1 Qh5 35 h3 as a defense for White?
Feb-08-09  zenpharaohs: Put me in for 32 ... Rxh2=

I don't see 32 ... g3 winning anything, and neither does Rybka 3,

32 ... g3
33 hxg3

But whenever it's a draw in a position this complex it's hard to trust engine analysis.

It is an interesting position with lots of tension, though.

Feb-08-09  znprdx: THIS WAS A DISAPPOINTMENT - I don't see how the text forces anything...surely 33.h2xg3 is preferable. I thought 32..Rd6 sets up a zugswang...it almost forces 33.Bc3 after which f4 34.g3 Bf3 35.b5 Qf7 A pretty continuation : if 36. Bxe5 Rh6 37. h4 gxh3 e.p. 38.Kh2 Qh5 39.Bxf4 Be4! if 40. Bx[R}h6? Qf3 41. Rg1 Qxf2+ 42.Kxh3 Q x[R]g1 43. Bf4 Qh1+ and the queen gets skewered. Oh well I had to set up the position and play it through...which explains why I never made to expert
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Sunday (Insane):

I Rausis vs Sadler, 1999 (32...?)

Black to play and win.

Material: Down a P with Bs of opposite color. The White Kg1 has 2 legal moves and is vulnerable to back-rank mates. The Black Rh6 has a semi-open h-file bearing down on Ph2; Be4 attacks Pg2; and Qe7 can enter the White K-field at h4. In compensation, the White Bb2 attacks Pe5, and the White battery Rc1 and Qc8 control the c-file. The Black Kh7 is secure, except for the check Qc8xf5+, which Be4 prevents. In the mid-game, Bs of opposite color promote attacks based on the squares of their respective color, so Black should try to accelerate his attack, possibly with a sacrifice.

Candidates (32…): Rxh2

32…Rxh2 (threatening 33…Rxg2+ or 33.g3 Rh1#)

The draw is in hand.

I could not make 32...Rxh2 work, so I did look at 32...g3, but I could not see a way through. This is an impressive combination.

Feb-08-09  mike1: nice swindle...but white did it to
himself. 32.... g3 33.hxg3 Qg5 34.Qe8
and black cannot play Qh5.White then
takes the e5 with the queen.
Feb-08-09  patzer2: For today's Sunday puzzle solution, Black plays the demolition pawn (sham) sacrifice 32...g3!, which leads to a sure win after White's reply of 33. fxg3? or an apparent draw with accurate follow-up after 33. hxg3!

White could have put up more resistance after 33. hxg3!, when it appears that with precise defense he has decent chances of holding the draw.

Here's my computer checked breakout:

<32...g3!! 33. fxg3?>

Black wins with strong play after this reply. Instead, White appears to have drawing chances after the strongest defense 33. hxg3! Qg5 34. Qc4! (or 34. Qa6!)

[Not 34. Qc7? (also bad is 34. Bxe5? Qh5! 35. f3 Bxf3 36. Kf2 Bxg2 37. Kxg2 Qe2+ 38. Kg1 Qxe3+ 39. Kg2 Qe4+ 40. Kg1 Rh1+ 41. Kf2 Rh2+ 42. Kf1 Qh1#) 34... Qh5 35. f3 Bxf3 36. Kf2 Bxg2 37. Qxe5 Qf3+ 38. Ke1 Rh1+ 39. Kd2 Qf2+ 40. Kc3 Rxc1+ 41. Bxc1 Be4 42. Bd2 , when play might continue 42...Qf1 43. Qd6 Qd1 44. Qxb6 Qc2+ 45. Kd4 Qxd2+ 46. Ke5 Qd5+ 47. Kf4 Bc2 48. Qd4 Qc6 49. Ke5 Qf6+ 50. Kf4 Qh6+ 51. Ke5 Be4 52. g4 Qf6+ 53. Kf4 Qh4 54. Qd2 Qxg4+ 55. Ke5 Qg3+ 56. Ke6 Qg6+ 57. Kd7 Qc6+ 58. Ke7 Qc7+ 59. Ke6 g5 60. a4 g4 61. Qd1 g3 .]

34...Qh5 35. f3! Bxf3 36. Qf1! Be2 37. Qe1 =.

Also not good for White is 33. h3?, then Black wins following 33...gxf2+ 34. Kxf2 Qh4+ 35. Ke2 Qg3 36. Rg1 Rc6 37. Qd7 Rc2+ 38. Kd1 Qf2 39. Re1 Rc1+ 40. Bxc1 Bc2#.

<33... Qg5 34. Qc3>

If 34. Kf2, then Black wins after 34...Rxh2 35. Rg1 Qg4! , when play might continue 36. Qc1 f4! 37. gxf4 exf4 38. Qf1 Qg3+ 39. Ke2 f3+ 40. Kd2 f2 41. Rh1 Rxh1 42. Qxh1+ Kg8 43. Bd4 Qc7 44. Bc5 bxc5 45. Qf1 cxb4 46. Qxf2 Qc2+ 47. Ke1 Qb1+ 48. Ke2 bxa3 .

<34... Qh5! 35. Kf2 Qxh2 36. Rg1 Rc6 37. Qxe5 Rc2+ 38. Kf1 Bd3+> 0-1

White resigns in lieu of 39. Ke1 Qxg1#

Feb-08-09  patzer2: <UnsoundHero> After <33 hxg3 Qg5 34 Qc4 Qh5 35 f3 Bxf3 36 Qf1 Be2 37 Qe1 f4 (Amazing how black keeps on sacrificing pawns to expose white's king some more). 38 exf4 exf4 39 Rc3 f3!>, White has 40. Qb1+!

Play could continue 40. Qb1+! Rg6 41. Rc6 when White is in no danger of losing.

Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I liked 32 Qb5 for white, double-attacking blacks's e pawn.


click for larger view

Now, black has to play 32...Re6 to deal with it, effectively diluting his attack.

Feb-08-09  Terry McCracken: <UnsoundHero: On 25 Bxa6 Bxa6 26 Qxe4 Bb7 27 Qc2 e5, Black has the initiative and attacking chances for a pawn. His Bb7 can't be challenged by white's bishop. White has some weak squares on the queenside and central files. Still, it's nerve-racking to sac a pawn like this in a real live tournament game.>

Unsound indeed! After 25. Bxa6..Bxa6 26..Qxe4..Bb7 27. Qc2(?) isn't the best, after 27. Qg4 White has a slight initiative.

Feb-08-09  Terry McCracken: Sunday's puzzle albeit interesting is a dud.
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <krippp: 32..g3 33.f3 Qg5> 34.Qc3, and now if 34...gxh2+ 35.Kh1 Qg3, then 36.fxe4.

If instead 34...Bxf3, then 35. gxf3 Rxf2 (35...gxh2+ 36. Kh1) 36. Qxe5 Qh6 37. Qxg7+ Qxg7 38. Bxg7 Kxg7.

I still see no win.

Feb-08-09  patzer2: <al wazir> After <32..g3 33.f3 Qg5 34.Qc3> 34...Rxh2! White will soon be mated.
Feb-08-09  patzer2: <Once: ... in the puzzle position black appears worse and would either want to bail out into a sure fire perpetual check (the Rxh2 line) or why not roll the dice with g3? This provocative little tease of a move also draws but offers white plenty of ways to go wrong along the way.> Nice summary of the rationale for 32...g3!
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <krippp>: Wait a minute. After 32..g3 33. f3 Qg5 34. Qc3 Rxh2 35. fxe4, black wins with 35...Qh6 36. Kf1 Rxg2! 37. Kxg2 (to avoid 37...Qh1#) Qh2+ 38. Kf1/Kf3 Qf2#.

So 33. f3 doesn't work. Anyone -- including Sadler -- who saw that at move 32 has my cordial admiration.

Feb-08-09  Marmot PFL: 33.fg3 looks like time pressure panic. I could not find a win after 33.hg3. 32.Qb5 would have stopped this attack as 33...Qg5 is answered by 34.Qxe5.
Feb-08-09  patzer2: <After 32..g3 33. f3 Qg5 34. Qc3 Rxh2 35. fxe4, black wins with 35...Qh6 > or 35...Qh5 36. any and 36...Rh1#.
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <patzer2>: Yep, that works too. Thanks.
Feb-08-09  DoubleCheck: <<<Terry McCracken>: could you put a line of your idea of 25. Bxa6>

Your analysis has some major flaws as 25..Rxb6 is impossible, Black would be capturing his own pawn!

25. Bxa6..Bxa6 26. Qxe4 winning a pawn giving White a Q-Side pawn advantage as well.>>

I made a mistake, big deal. I see the point of it now, although white is not exactly gaining time or space by it since;

25. Bxa6 Bxa6
26. Qxe4 Bb7
27. Qb1 f6
(If 27. Qd3 e5!)
(If 27. Qc2 Rc6 w/ Rxc1+)

So white is greedy in stealing the a-pawn but I cant see the long term advantage since his DSB cant penetrate. Explain the advantage in more detail since white has opened up blacks excellent bishop

Mar-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: 7 b3 is rarely played but has the advantage of avoiding mainline theory. 9..Bxc5 was new; 9..Nxc5 had been played in the draw Seirawan-Van Wely Amsterdam 1995. 21..Rd2 22 Bc3..Rxe2 23 Qc4! would have lost material for Black.

<UnsoundHero: On 25 Bxa6 Bxa6 26 Qxe4 Bb7 27 Qc2 e5, Black has the initiative and attacking chances for a pawn. His Bb7 can't be challenged by white's bishop. White has some weak squares on the queenside and central files. > According to Sadler 24..Ne4? was an oversight not a pawn sacrifice.

<mike1: nice swindle...but white did it to himself. 32.... g3 33.hxg3 Qg5 34.Qe8 and black cannot play Qh5.White then takes the e5 with the queen.>

Sadler gives 34..Qg4 35 f3..Bxf3 36 Qxe5 and either 36..f4 or 36..Be4 37 Qxe5..Rh2 38 Rg1..Qf3+ as winning for Black but to me 35 Qxe5 looks stronger as 35..Bxg2 can be answered by 36 Qxg7+..Qxg7 37 Bxg7..Rh1+ 38 Kxg2..Rxc1.

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