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Peter Leko vs Teimour Radjabov
Morelia-Linares (2006), Morelia MEX, rd 2, Feb-19
Sicilian Defense: Lasker-Pelikan. Sveshnikov Variation Chelyabinsk Variation (B33)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 4 times; par: 38 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 36 OF 36 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-16-08  YouRang: I'm going to make a little guess here that the people who had trouble with today's puzzle might not be familiar enough with the Arabian mating pattern (thanks <Lutwidge>) to quickly spot it's relevance to this position.

It's always wonderful when you can threaten mate without the queen (in this case, with just a R+N). When the queen needn't fear capture, it makes it doubly dangerous.

Sep-16-08  Hans Wiemerink: <Once>
I'm convinced. Thank you, for the explanation. 45. Qc6 is indeed the second solution! Cool. Chess can be a very magic puzzle!
Sep-16-08  TheaN: <zb2cr> nice to list all the people: include my line as a useless prolongation of the game: seriously though, my line does support some critical endgame knowledge, as a breakthrough is needed.

<45.Nf6 Rxf6 46.Rd8† Rf8 47.Qxb5 Qe7 <48.Rxf8†?!> Qxf8 49.Qe5† Kg8 50.Qxg5† Kf7 51.Qf5† Ke8 52.Qxf8† Kxf8 53.b4 Ke7 54.b5 Kd6 55.g4 >, as either pawn, b, g, or h by breakthrough, is going to Queen: if the Black King is sticking to the kingside, b walks, if he goes to the queenside, g walks. Staying in the middle is just useless, as White can march up either pawn until the King goes that way, after which the pawn on the other side can run... critical piece of knowledge in a 2♙ advantage.

Sep-16-08  ruzon: I saw 45.Nf6 Rxf6 and then gave up. Many minutes later I went back to it and noticed 46.Rd8+ Rf8 47.Qf7. I have more confidence in my Tuesday abilities than I used to.
Sep-16-08  macphearsome: i found this puzzle immensely difficult for a tuesday! however, upon looking at the solution, it seems so obvious!

an informative puzzle, for sure

Sep-17-08  mrvertigo: I think everyone would have solved it in much less time if it had been a Thursday puzzle...
Sep-17-08  beginner64: Wouldn't 41..Rbf7 have been much better for black (instead of Rbb8)?

I was surprised at the Rbb8 move, but perhaps the intention is to keep the pressure on the b3 pawn, which I personally don't see that critical in this stage of the game due to strong attacks on both sides.

Sep-17-08  euripides: <beginner> <41...Rbf7> is positionally better but loses tactically: 42.Qxf7 Rxf7 43.Rd8+ Rf8 44.Rxf8 mate.
Oct-06-10  sevenseaman: 45. Nf6, a cracking good move, irrefutable.
Oct-06-10  sevenseaman: Go to Shirov vs Judit Polgar, 1994, wherein I've submitted an end game on the theme used in this game in my comment of Sep-12-10.

The full solution follows on the same page in my next comment of Sep-24-10.

Do not read the latter comment until you have spent some time on solving the puzzle. Its not too difficult, seeing the cerebral talent trolling these pages.

Mar-27-20  goldfarbdj: Thought about the exchange sac but couldn't really see a continuation — about normal for Friday.

But what I REALLY want to draw attention to is the chrisowen comment from 2008-9-16, above. It's completely lucid!

Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: I think 42...Qa1 would have been better than Qb4.

If 43. Nf6, then 43...e4 44. Nxe4 Qb2 or 43...Rxf6 44. Rxf6 Qd4 leaves black with a playable game.

Mar-27-20  Walter Glattke: The bishop pins Rd5, so 38.Rxb7 Rxb7 39.h6+ Kg6 40.Qc2+ e4 (40.-Kh5 41.Nf6#) 41.Rxd6+. White wins.
Mar-27-20  tigreton: Vow! Great Leko! In case 45 ... Rxf6 46 Rd8+ Rf8 47 Qd4+ is even quicker than 47 Qxb5.
Mar-27-20  tigreton: I also like the calm 41. Qd5, increasing the pressure and preventing 41 ... Rbf7 because of 42. Qxf7 followed by Rd8+ and mate. Prophilaxis is also important while attacking.
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Bumble!
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Transformers!
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: But my bad?
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a knight for a bishop.

Black threatens Bxd5+.

I'd get rid of the bishop with 38.Rxb7 and think later.

Mar-27-20  TheaN: Somehow this position rang a bell and apparently it was used as a... Tuesday in 2008, but on move 45. Prolonging a move 45 Tuesday to a move 38 Friday seems tough, and frankly this might be an above average Friday.

However, it's more about concept here than the actual finish: at some point the Bb7 must have attacked the Rd5 but did it happen the previous move? It's not really required as taking there is by any means terrible for Black. As such, we might as well force Rd5 into the attack with <38.Rxb7 Rexb7 (Rbxb7 39.h6+ Kf8 40.Rxd6 +-, the addition of the back rank for White doesn't help) 39.Rxd6>:


click for larger view

This is one of those positions where you know the knight's stronger than the rook (maybe both, at this point) and the white king's safe after a potential Qe4-Kh2. The exact finish isn't even required.

Some critical lines besides the game line: 39....Rb4? 40.Rd7+ Kh8 41.Qf7! Qe4+ 42.Kh2 with mate, 39....Re7/Rf7 40.h6+ with 41.Qd5 +-. The ideas are simple, the rooks don't coordinate and White controls the squares around the Black king. The end's beautiful, but not required per se.

Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Cetus!
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Garry's bargain where you at xx
Mar-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: <agb2002 .... think later> excellent strategy, the mark of a military man! I attacked this one a move at a time as well, starting with 38 Rxb7 ;)
Mar-27-20  RandomVisitor: Maybe 11...Rb8 is worth considering.


click for larger view

Stockfish_20032521_x64_modern:

<60/88 8:47:31 +0.13 11...Rb8 12.Nc2 Bg5> 13.a3 Ne7 14.Nxe7 Bxe7 15.Nb4 Bb7 16.a4 0-0 17.axb5 axb5 18.Nd5 Bxd5 19.Qxd5 Qb6 20.b4 Rfc8 21.Ra3 Rb7 22.Be2 Ra7 23.Rxa7 Qxa7 24.0-0 Rxc3 25.Bxb5 g6 26.Be8 Bd8 27.Qxd6 Be7 28.Qxe5 Bxb4 29.h4 Rc2 30.Bb5 Bc3 31.Qf4 Qe7 32.Bd3 Rd2 33.Qe3 Qf6 34.Rc1 Qd4 35.Bc4 Qxe3 36.fxe3 Be5 37.Rf1 Rd7 38.g4 Bg3 39.h5 gxh5 40.gxh5 Be5 41.Rxf7 Rxf7 42.Bxf7+ Kxf7 43.Kg2 Ke7 44.h6 Bf6

Mar-27-20  johnny6: If 45...Rxf6 46. Rd8+ Rf8 47. Qd4+!! Re5 (or 45...Qxd4 46. Rxf8#) 48. Qxe5+ Kg8 49. Qg7#
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