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Magnus Carlsen vs Helgi Ass Gretarsson
European Club Cup (2003), Rethymnon GRE, rd 7, Oct-04
Semi-Slav Defense: Stoltz Variation. Shabalov Attack (D45)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-24-03  AdrianP: <rover> Thanks for pointing me to the game... Rg3 and Bh4 is a very nice shot, and it's made it into my collection.
Nov-26-03  patzer2: The ChessGames.Com Opening Explorer shows 86 games with 7. g4, played from 1992 to 2003. White won 45.3% while black won 19.8% of the games played with this move. Perhaps better than the reply 7...Nxg4, which has only a , 15.8% winning percentage for black and a 57.9% advantage for white is 7...dxc4 which won for black 31.8% of the time while limiting white to a 22.7% winning percentage. Some sample games showing black's potential with 7...dxc4 include Michael Adams vs Kasparov, 1992 and Kasparov vs Deep Junior, 2003 and Gelfand vs Lautier, 1994 and D Gurevich vs Kaidanov, 1995
Jan-25-04  mymt: AdrianP isnt 32...Rxg6.33.Qe7# one? but whats 32...Kxg6.33.Qxh5# called?
Feb-27-04  panigma: Just met a guy the other day. Philip Mikant. You figure it out.
Apr-27-04  lordhazol: Möthiº!!
Jul-06-04  Dick Brain: I certainly could be wrong, but I do not believe that this is the epaulette mate. I don't have my book in front of me but IIRC in Vukovic's "The Art of Attack" he demonstrates the epaulette mate to be, for example, if black K were on e8 and there were black rooks on d8 and f8, the a Q on e6 would be mate.
Jul-06-04  acirce: I don't know about "true" definitions, but <Dick Brain> is right about the book, anyway. Qf6 vs Kf8+Re8+Rg8 is called Epaulette Mate, while Qf6+pg5 vs Kf7+Re8+Rg8 is called 'Swallow's tail'
Jul-26-05  Bobwhoosta: White is definitely threatening an epaulette mate, which is also called a "Swallow's Tail" in Pandolfini's Chess Dictionary.
Nov-06-05  patzer2: On second thought, the neat 32. Bg6+! is a decoy obstruction or blockade move, by which White forces black to block or obstruct his flight squares and allow mate on e7 or h5.
Nov-06-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: 32.Bg6+ is a Stoke-Adams attack which harmonizes the squares e7 & h5 so that they become conjugate squares.
Nov-06-05  patzer2: See the definitions "decoy" and "obstruction sacrifice" in the Chess Dictionary at National Master Pete Prochaska's "Chess Odyssey site at http://www.angelfire.com/games5/che... .

The surprise move 32. Bg6+!, is a decoy because it forces a piece (either the King or the Rook) to capture on g6. If the Rook captures, 32...Rxg6, it obstructs his King's flight square and allows 33. Qe7#. If the King captures, 32...Kxg6, White mates with 33. Qh5#.

With either capture (32...Kxg6 or 32...Rxg6) a piece is forced to occupy g6 making it a decoy. However, it is an obstruction only if the Rook recaptures (32...Rxg6). So this game and 32. Bg6+ is moving to my "decoy" collection.

P.S. <offramp> Hope you're doing well and everything is OK.

Nov-14-06  BipolarChessorder: Where's the win after 24....Rg1+ 25. Ke2 Rxa1?
Nov-14-06  NBZ: Rg1+ Ke2 Rxa1 Qxf6+ Kd7 Qf4! looks very dangerous with the twin threats of Qd6+ and Nf6+. When the queen moves to avoid the fork (say Qg6 or Qh8), White plays Qd6+ Ke8 Bh5! Qxh5 Nf6+ wins the queen at last
Jun-17-07  jdoliner: Wow this is a poster game for the swallow tail mate formation, White is threatening both variations to win this game
Feb-02-08  Eyal: <NBZ: [24...]Rg1+ Ke2 Rxa1 Qxf6+ Kd7 Qf4! looks very dangerous with the twin threats of Qd6+ and Nf6+. When the queen moves to avoid the fork (say Qg6 or Qh8), White plays Qd6+ Ke8 Bh5! Qxh5 Nf6+ wins the queen at last>

It doesn't quite work, though, since Qxh5 is played with a check... However [24...Rg1+ 25.Ke2 Rxa1] 26.Nxf6! is winning, e.g. Qf7 27.Ng4+ Kf8 28.Ne5 Qf5 29.Be4 or 26...Qg6 27.Nd5+ Kf7 28.Qe7+ Kg8 29.Nf6+

Carlsen's exchange sacrifice in this game was very creative, but perhaps not completely sound (even though it succeeded in practice). In any case, 22.Qxh7 - instead of Qe5 - was definitely a mistake, since Black would be winning after 22...Qxd4. And Black could still have a draw with 29...Be6 instead of Bd7??, where apparently White has nothing better than forcing a perpetual by 30.Qh5+ Kf8 31.Qc5+ Kf7 (31...Re7 32.Bf5 Kf7 33.Bg4 would get Black into trouble) 32.Qh5+ etc. But then Gretarsson wouldn't get to be remembered in chess history as losing a beautiful game to 13-year-old Carlsen...

Feb-02-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  egilarne: Magnus was still 12 years old - the game was played on the 4th of October, and Magnus became 13 the 30th of November - but it was a 12 year old IM rated 2450 - - - :) - according to the rating list of the 1st of October 2003.
Feb-02-08  Zygote: Apart from the comments which you guys have to make on this poor GMs name, there is not much else negative to be said about him... he became a GM (if a weak one) which is more than most people can do....
May-06-08  notyetagm: White to play: 32 ?


click for larger view

<patzer2: The winning 32. Bg6+! is a stunning deflection move by the young Carlsen. The capture of the bishop is forced.>

Position after 32 ♗e4-g6+! 1-0


click for larger view

<If 32...Kxg6 33. Qh5#,>

(VAR) Position after 32 ... ♔f7x♗g6 33 ♕c5-h5#


click for larger view

<and if 32...Rxg6 33. Qe7#. >

(VAR) Position after 32 ... ♖g7x♗g6 33 ♕c5-e7#


click for larger view

So 32 ♗e4-g6+! leads to two -different- <EPAULETTE MATES>!

This Carlsen is really something else: he was only 12(!)-years old when he played this game! Holy criminy!

Aug-24-08  jsteward: somebody,anybody! give me a clean logical continuation to win for white after24...Rg1+!
Nov-10-08  norcist: lol i don't know about clean and logical but here is a line that i just examined

24.)...Rg1+? 25.)Kd2 Rxa1 26.) Nxf6 Qf7 (the best square i can find) 27.) Nd5+

and then its just a matter of picking ur poison.

28.)...Kd7 loses to 29.) Bh5 Qg7 (otherwise its checkmate or fork on the next move) 30.) Nf6+ and Black will lose his Queen on the next move

Dec-22-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Is <12...Qxh2> untested?
Apr-24-09  urigata: WOW..I'm speechless..Nice game
Jun-01-09  MrMelad: Great game, pun for the contest: "The ace against the great ass" lol :)
Jul-15-09  Notagm: 24... e5 was a howler by Black, opening the file on which his King was located.
Sep-21-09  tentsewang: This young genius is just fantastic! I'll add him in one of my favorites.
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