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Vladimir Kramnik vs Sergei Tiviakov
Corus Group A (2001), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 4, Jan-17
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Normal Variation. Bernstein Defense (E59)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-18-06  KingG: Another great Kramnik game.

Here are Nigel Short's notes on the game:

<In my senescence I have come to hold various firm and unshakable convictions - one being that all serious d4 players should have the Rubinstein Nimzo-Indian somewhere in their repertoire.The opening is fundamentally sound for Black, but the positions are so strategically rich that they promise great rewards for diligent worker blessed with some understanding. Vladimir Kramnik has considerably more than just "some understanding" and here he uses it to great effect.> 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0–0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0–0 Nc6 8.a3 Bxc3 9.bxc3 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qc7 11.Bb2 e5 12.h3 <According to ECO black should consider 12...Bf5 here. For the younger readers I should explain that ECO is a book made by binding sheets of printed paper. In the dark ages before everyone had computers people used such things! Laughable isn't it? Well, anyway strange as it may sound ECO may not be entirely wrong. Tiviakov's next move looks premature.> 12...e4 13.Nd2 Na5 14.Ba2 Bf5 15.c4 Rfe8 16.d5 Nd7 17.f4 <The position is opened up. Black must capture.> 17...exf3 18.Qxf3 Bg6 19.h4 h5 20.Bb1 Qd6 21.Bc3 b6 22.Ne4 Rxe4 <Fritz, naturally prefers to hang onto the material with Qe7. Offhand I do not see anything wrong with that but if you wish to have more extensive analysis you will have to wait for the comments of the players themselves.> 23.Bxe4 Nxc4 24.Qf4 Qxf4 25.Rxf4 Nxe3 26.Bf3 Nc2 <The main problem is revealed : this knight is on a very poor circuit.> 27.Ra2 Re8 28.g4 hxg4 29.Bxg4 Ne5 30.d6 Nxg4 31.Rxg4 Re6 <Trying to snare one pawn but now the h-pawn becomes a monster.> 32.h5 Bd3 33.d7 Rd6 34.Rxg7+ Kf8 35.h6 Nd4 36.Rag2 Bg6 37.Rf2 Nf5 38.h7 <A powerful game by Kramnik.> 1–0

Not particularly enlightening i know, but i thought i would post it anyway.

Jun-18-06  Karpova: I have to agree. This is really a good game.

But it would have been better if Short had provided us with more analysis and spared us with comments like this one: <For the younger readers I should explain that ECO is a book made by binding sheets of printed paper. In the dark ages before everyone had computers people used such things! Laughable isn't it? Well, anyway strange as it may sound ECO may not be entirely wrong.>

Jun-18-06  KingG: Yeah, i agree, but that seems to be the kind of stuff chessbase pay Short to type.
Jun-18-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ron: <KingG> Thanks for the reprint of Shorts' comments. As one who prefers D4, I think Short is exactly right when he says: one being that all serious d4 players should have the Rubinstein Nimzo-Indian somewhere in their repertoire.
Mar-12-14  babakova: 37.R2xg6 fxg6 38.Rh7 Kg8 39.Re7 is another cute option.
Mar-17-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: 16 Qe2 would have transposed into Diez del Corral-O'Kelly Palma de Mallorca 1967 (Black won); 16 d5 was new. Kramnik recommended 15..Nc6 16 d5..Ne5 17 f4 as a better plan than the one Black played. An alternative way of giving up the exchange was 22..Qe7 23 d6..Qxh4 24 Bxa5..Rxe4 25 Bxe4..Qxe4 with compensation. A better continuation for Black was 25..Bxe4 26 Rxe4..Nd6 and if 27 Re7 then 27..Rd8 28 Rf1..Kf8 29 Re6..Nb5 30 Bb2..c4. 28 g4! emphasized the importance of the d-pawn; the alternative 28 Bxh5..Bxh5 29 Rxc2..Re3 would have given Black good counterplay. After 30..Ng4? Black was lost; better was 30..f6 31 Bxe5..fxe 32 Ra4..Rd8 33 d7..Ne3 34 Be6+..Bf7 35 Bxf7+..Kxf7 36 Re2..Nd5 37 Rxa7..Ke6 38 Rg2 though White would have had a clear advantage.

Tiviakov's exchange sacrifice looked promising but he was outplayed by Kramnik who concluded the game masterfully.

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