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Yuhua Xu vs Elina Danielian
Women's World Championship Knockout Tournament (2001), Moscow RUS, rd 2, Nov-29
Caro-Kann Defense: Karpov Variation. Modern Main Line (B17)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: 46. h7+ Kxh7 47. exf8=N+ 48. Kg7 Nxg6.
Mar-23-21  Cheapo by the Dozen: First I thought this was about underpromotion. Then I thought it was about tempi.

Naah. It's simply about an overloaded king who can't keep both pawns from queening.

Mar-23-21  Walter Glattke: Amazing horsepower with 46.h7+ Kxh7 47.exf8N+ Kg7 48.Nxg6 Nxe1 the hour of the horse!
Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has four pawns for a rook.

Black threatens Nxe1, Re8 and Rxh6.

The black king is overloaded with the defense of f8 and h8. Hence, 46.h7+:

A) 46... Kxh7 47.exf8=Q Nxe1 48.Qe7+ wins decisive material.

B) 46... K(f)g7 47.exf8=Q+ Kxf8 48.h8=Q+ wins decisive material.

C) 46... Kh8 47.exf8=Q+ Kxh7 (47... Rg8 48.Qh6#) 48.Re7+ Rg7 49.Qxg7#.

Mar-23-21  saturn2: White has a rook less but wins by 46.h7+

46...Kxh7 47. exf8Q Nxe1 48. Qe7 wins also rhe knight

...46...Kf(g)7 47. exf8Q+ Kxf8 48. h8=Q+ Kf7 49. Qe- 8 also hwee the Nd3 will fall and soin mate

46...Kh8 47. exf8=Q+ Kxh7 48. Re7

Mar-23-21  stacase: 46.h7+ produces a White Queen that will survive no matter what Black does to get out of check.
Mar-23-21  mel gibson: Easy to stuff up.
3 ways to get a Queen but only one leads to a quick win - the text move.

Stockfish 13 says mate in 20.

46. h7+

(46. h7+ (h6-h7+ ♔g8xh7 e7xf8♕ ♘d3xe1 ♕f8-e7+ ♔h7-g8 ♕e7xe1 ♔g8-f7 ♕e1-f2+ ♔f7-e7 ♕f2xa7+ ♔e7-f6 ♕a7-b8 ♖g6-g7 ♘f1-e3 ♔f6-e6 ♕b8-e8+ ♖g7-e7 ♕e8-c6+ ♔e6-f7 ♘e3-d5 ♖e7-a7 ♕c6-b6 ♖a7-a1+ ♔g1-f2 ♔f7-g8 ♕b6-d8+ ♔g8-h7 ♕d8-g5 ♖a1-a2+ ♔f2-f3 ♖a2-a6 ♘d5-e7 ♖a6-f6+ ♔f3-g4 ♖f6-f4+ g3xf4 ♔h7-h8 ♕g5-g8+) +M20/68 176)

Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: After 46.h7+ Kxh7, the big question is whether to promote the pawn to queen or knight. Knight is much classier.
Mar-23-21  Brenin: The combination began a move earlier, with White and Black Rs on f4 and e8; that would have made a slightly more challenging puzzle.
Mar-23-21  Walter Glattke: Mate in 20 moves with exf8Q, mate in less thinking time for the tournament player by exf8N+
Mar-23-21  AlicesKnight: Pretty. 46.h7+ is followed by exf8=Q and one or other of the white Ps survives as a Q - enough to win.
Mar-23-21  AlicesKnight: I see the finish is not unrelated to the GOTD ending.
Mar-23-21  TheaN: <46.h7+>. Doesn't really get much easier than that, either pawn promotes.

<FSR: After 46.h7+ Kxh7, the big question is whether to promote the pawn to queen or knight. Knight is much classier.>

Not saying it's realistic, but after 46....Kxh7 47.exf8N+ Kh6 48.Nxg6 Nxe1, Black has the slightest chance of surviving as it's a knights endgame.

Specifically, the king's blocking g, a is blocking b and the knight could attempt to block c; in short, White actually puts an endgame on the board.

After 47.exf8Q, Black doesn't have much better than 47....Nxe1, but 48.Qe7+ with Qxe1 and it's smooth sailing.

Mar-23-21  malt: 46.h7+ K:h7
(46...Kg7 47.ef8/Q+ K:f8 48.h8/Q+ )
47.ef8/Q
Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Agreed with <FSR>. No question I'd promote to Knight there.
Mar-23-21  Refused: 46.h7+ Kxh7 47.f8N+ Kg7 48.Nxg6

47.f8Q might be stronger/more accurate objectively, but from a practical point of view I like to keep counter chances at a bare minumum.

Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Nab h7+finish icicle decide ah dried accommodate woo vic nab fricassee vic within which hq quick knights tanky beast mop goody xulus livid its faces key how vinty drug it messy key tot add gadfly decide da finish me it is up now it flash h7+ cat?
Mar-23-21  lentil: This would have been a much more 'fun' puzzle one move earlier!
Mar-23-21  Cheapo by the Dozen: One reason to promote to queen rather than knight is that Black's knight at e1 is apt to be lost to a queen fork.
Mar-23-21  Walter Glattke: Yes, I see now, it's easy for a pupil to win against Carlsen also after 47.-Nxe1 48Qe7+, no fight Q vs. Rook necessary, no hard thinking.
Mar-23-21  Ivan Karamazov: Interesting fact: remove both White pieces from the board


click for larger view

And 46.h7+ is still winning for White.

Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Ivan Karamazov> Good point. How are your brothers these days?
Mar-23-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <TheaN> No doubt that queening is objectively stronger, but I don't Black has any chance of surviving in the two knights versus one knight ending where he's down two pawns.
Mar-23-21  Nullifidian: 47. ♙h7+ and the king can't defend against the threat of both pawns on the seventh rank.
Mar-24-21  RandomVisitor: With moves like 4...Nd7 and 10...c5 black somehow hopes things will turn out better for her in sidelines, but maybe the best black can hope for in this opening is the main line:


click for larger view

Stockfish_21031920_x64_modern:

<66/94 21:21:22 +0.14 4...Bf5 5.Ng3 Bg6 6.h4 h6> 7.Nf3 Nd7 8.h5 Bh7 9.Bd3 Bxd3 10.Qxd3 e6 11.Bd2 Ngf6 12.0-0-0 Be7 13.Ne4 0-0 14.Nxf6+ Nxf6

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