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Larry Christiansen vs John Nunn
Vienna (1991), Vienna AUT, rd 4, Oct-??
King's Indian Defense: Saemisch Variation. Normal Defense (E81)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Sep-05-16  YouRang: Monday 36.?


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A little trickier than the usual Monday-fare, IMO. For a while I thought about deflecting the black queen so that I could play Qg8#, but no way to make that happen.

Then I noticed that Ng6 would be mate if not for black's bishop. So how about deflecting the bishop? That I can do! <36.Rxf6+>


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Now <36...Bxf6> is met by <37.Ng6#>

What's really pretty is that if black blocks check with 36...Qf7, then the queen is effectively deflected (thanks to pin), and so I can play my originally intended <37.Qg8#> after all!


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Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: good choice <ceegee>, (after 7.5 years;))!! I took me some 30 seconds, though.
Sep-05-16  The Kings Domain: Embarrassingly didn't get this. Thought of the text move but couldn't see the logic behind it. Sheesh.
Sep-05-16  Cheapo by the Dozen: Cool -- diverting the interposer isn't really that common.
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willber G: Nice puzzle, I agree it is more like a Tuesday one though due to the choice of responses by black.
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Pretty tough for Monday. Took me a while.
Sep-05-16  saturn2: I think 36 Nf5 wins a piece. I calculated the possible answers 36 ..Qf7, 36..Qg4 and 36..RxRe1 and in all I came up with a plus piece for white. However I dont have a machine to verify.
Sep-05-16  laskereshevsky: 1) 36.Rxf6+:
if: 1a)36... Bxf6 37 Ng6#
if: 1b)36... Qf7 37 Ng6# < 1b1)37.Qg8#>
Sep-05-16  mel gibson: Didn't see it but I gave up after 10 seconds.
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: The usual Monday Method, Check all Checks starting off the with the Queen (there are three of them!) goes nowhere.

Thankfully never wasted my brain cells on that path. Rxf6+ jumps out at you the moment you see the position.

The Queen and Knight make perfect attacking partners. You could call this an Amazon Mate.

An Amazon in Fairy Chess Terms is a piece that is a Queen and Knight combined. Very powerful. It can mate you out of the blue.

In the final position replace the g6 Knight with an Amazon.


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It is Mate.

Remove the g6 Knight and the White Queen is an Amazon.


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Another mate...Amazing!

---

These two have an on going Saemisch Battle. Five times they have crossed Saemisch Swords, each time with Larry as White.

Larry is winning P5. W4. D1.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

Sep-05-16  zb2cr: I started out looking at 36. Ng6+, Kf7 but I did not see things going anywhere. Then the happy thought occurred to me that 36. Rxf6+, Bxf6; 37. Ng6#. Black's only other move would be to sacrifice Queen for Rook, with 36. ... Qf7, but that is met by 37. Rxf7+, Kxf7; 38. Qg6+, Kf8; 39. Qf5+ with mate to follow, so that's okay. I missed the mates pointed out by <YouRang> and <laskereshevsky> after 36. ... Qf7.
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bubo bubo: At the moment g8 is protected, and on Nf6+ the king has the flight square f7. Therefore we need some preparation: 36.Rxf6+! Now 36...Bxf6 opens the 7th rank, allowing 37.Ng6#, while 36...Qf7 leaves the black queen pinned, allowing 37.Qg8#.

Is there a name for this type of motif in the chess problems terminology?

Sep-05-16  patzer2: <Bubo bubo> <Now 36...Rxf6 opens the 7th rank, allowing 37.Ng6#, while 36...Qf7 leaves the black queen pinned, allowing 37.Qg8#.> From this succinct description, it appears you visualized the two-move-mate combination as employing both the "clearance" (clears or opens a key portion of the 7th rank for the Queen) and "pinning" tactical motifs.

In addition, 36...Rxf6 might also be considered a "deflection," as it deflects or removes the Bishop from g7 in order to allow the mate.

Because two move mates often involve several tactical themes, I prefer to classify them as "mate-in-two."

Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Breunor: This is one of those puzzles that I got pretty easily, but unfortunately, I'm certain I wouldn't have found it if I didn't know we had 'white to move and win'. I wouldn't have gotten it over the board.
Sep-05-16  stst: Mon. R-sac:

RxP+ BxR(forced, cannot pass)
Ng6#

Sep-05-16  stacase: <Sally Simpson: ...An Amazon in Fairy Chess Terms is a piece that...>

I always wanted a Fairy Chess variation that allowed to take your own men if you wanted to. Think about it how many times has one of your own guys got in the way? Well, what if you could just blow him away?

Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willber G: <stst: RxP+ BxR(forced, cannot pass)>

36...BxR is not forced as there is the blocking move 36...Qf7, which leads to 37.Qg8#

Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  rodchuck: <stacase: Well, what if you could just blow him away?> friendly fire or collateral you mean?
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <patzer2: <Bubo bubo> <Now 36...Rxf6 opens the 7th rank, allowing 37.Ng6#, while 36...Qf7 leaves the black queen pinned, allowing 37.Qg8#.> From this succinct description, it appears you visualized the two-move-mate combination as employing both the "clearance" (clears or opens a key portion of the 7th rank for the Queen) and "pinning" tactical motifs.>

And it appears you survived the tropical kerfuffle. Glad to see it.

Sep-05-16  watwinc: Christiansen definitely won the debate over the KI Saemisch with four wins to one draw
Sep-05-16  patzer2: <thegoodanarchist> Thanks! We just have to haul off the storm debris when the city waste area opens up tomorrow.

My friends and relatives in Tallahassee, Florida are not so fortunate, as many of them are still without power since Thursday. When hurricanes come up from the Gulf, it's one of the drawbacks of living in a "tree city" with overhead power lines.

Sep-05-16  Herma48852: Once I saw that e7 was covered by the R/e1 after checking with Ng6, a little deflection was necessary to make it work: 36. Rxf6+! Bxf6 (or Qf7) 37. Ng6#
Sep-05-16  stacase: <rodchuck: <friendly fire or collateral you mean?>

Those terms imply unintentional liquidation. So no, I mean capturing your own man for positional advantage. I convinced my brother to play a game with that rule once, I won because of it, and he promptly declared it as a dumb variation.

Sep-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Good Monday puzzle: The rook sac enables the queen to block the black king's escapes and the knight mates next move at g6.
Feb-03-17  SpiritedReposte: The rook destroys the illusion of defense.
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