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Garry Kasparov vs Andrei V Kharitonov
Junior Tournament (1977), Leningrad URS, rd 9, Feb-??
Spanish Game: Exchange. Gligoric Variation (C69)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: No fork on b5. R c8+ then Rc7+, picking up up the knight.
Jul-06-21  awfulhangover: Ouch, did not see 34.Rc5. Embarrassing. Missing a Tuesday puzzle , omg :(
Jul-06-21  timeclimber: <keypusher: No, because if 34.Rc8+ Kf7 35.Rc5 Bc3 Black wins. White needs to keep the check on c8 in reserve.>

How does Black win after 36.Rxc3?

Jul-06-21  timeclimber: Also, keeping the check in reserve seems a moot point because Black can still play ..Bc3 after the textbook move (34.Rc5), which protects the Knight but loses the Bishop (and likely the game).
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: I got to 33. Rxc7 Bxb2 34. Rc5 Bc3 and couldn't see a way forward for white.
Tough Tuesday.
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Rival its ok ivories vehicles rinkus Rxc7 finish abridge ivories axled its aiights ivories ignoble rivals its ok ivories velcros rinkus agains buffmat its width ivories children virtues irk its no yule its ok ivories velcros nevline rinkus quill quagmire gritz its biffs ivories roal its which dont funny ivories vanguard its ok ivories velcros rinkus map Ba3 garcon accommodate ivories manage Nxc4 goofball its ok ivories velcros rinkus abracadabra its maybe its axiom ivories velcros o?saint vehement its totups ivories finish accommodate in it ear v accord matches its end dopamine tamagotchi ivories its pearly chew its ok ivories velcros craggier its Rxc7 etcetera;
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: This puzzle reminds me of why I suck at chess.
I praise myself of an excellent memory, but that only rings true when it comes to information I read or hear. Visual information on the other hand, just don't seem to stick in my mind. I don't think I would be a reliable witness in court.

When it comes to chess I lose control of the pieces after a laughable low number of moves, so when seeing the board after 33. Rxc7 Bxb2 34. Rc5 Bc3 the intermediate check is banal, but imagining it in my head just two moves earlier is just not happening.

I would be interested in knowing how other people do calculations. Do you just visualize the board, or is the process more abstract?

Jul-06-21  TheaN: Hard Tuesday. Not really a Tuesday puzzle also, it's more endgame technique than anything else.

There's a couple of things happening. White's pieces are in and the Black b-pawn is dangerous. However, White's up an exchange so has some leeway to stop the threats.

First hand <a> move for White is not that obvious; we can't protect the knight, if we move it the rook falls. So after a while it becomes clear we'll have to do something with the position after BxN.

So, <33.Rxc7> makes sense, picking up a crucial pawn. <33....Bxb2> an alternative here allows White to play Nc4, protecting both pieces and keeping tabs on the b-pawn.

Only now did I spot the precarious position of Na5. It's trapped after <34.Rc5> except for 34....Nb7 but then 35.Rc8 Kf7 36.Rc7+ +- picks it up anyway and the rook's on the b-file with tempo.

So, does it matter if we play 34.Rc5 or 34.Rc8+? first? Yes, it does. Black's best try (not the best move) after Rc5 would be <34....Bc3!? 35.Rxc3! b2 36.Rc8+ Kf7 37.Rb8 +->. Were White to play 34.Rc8+? first, 34....Kf7 35.Rc5 Bc3! and now 36.Rxc3? loses to 36....b2 -+ and White doesn't have Rc7-b7 due to NxR. After 36.Rb5, White loses, because the b-pawn will eventually cost the rook.

Interesting endgame combination, doubtful if it's a Tuesday.

Jul-06-21  1g1yy: <Diademas: I would be interested in knowing how other people do calculations. Do you just visualize the board, or is the process more abstract?>

I think it's just a matter of practice. I'm not very good at it either, but constantly practicing it has helped me to go a few plies deeper which is helping my games and solving quite a lot. Try any of the sites that offer lessons and work on the tactical puzzles and it will really help. You won't become Peter Svidler Jr overnight, but you'll definitely see progress if you work at it daily.

It's just another skill you need to develop, and probably haven't made a concerted effort to. I find if I work on one skill area, I quickly see other areas where I'm weak and never realized it. I think slowly building "All" the skills together is more important to my improvement than leaning any one skill very deeply.

Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: That's my boss no?
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Teyss: <Diademas> I have to visualise the board, not good at abstract vision which apparently some players have (they "see" the overall board and conceptualise the lines, threats, hanging pieces, etc.).

The issue with such materialistic vision is that I overlook changes with expected moves e.g. freed squares or lines, pin/unpin, checks, etc. Probably would not be the case with an abstract vision which better understands the internal logic of the position.

Yes it is a difficult Tuesday. So you are not alone my friend.

PS: hilarious profile of yours.

Jul-06-21  WorstPlayerEver: Darn, got the idea. Beautiful puzzel, though.
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: HBBa3 ark yes x lol y :)
Jul-06-21  dhotts: Hard to believe the World Champion Kasparov, one of the greatest players, needed a gift to win this one. All Black had to do was 32...Nxc4 and bring his king into play, instead of the blunder 32...Ba3???
Jul-06-21  timeclimber: <dhotts: Hard to believe the World Champion Kasparov, one of the greatest players, needed a gift to win this one. All Black had to do was 32...Nxc4 and bring his king into play, instead of the blunder 32...Ba3???>

Black is not a random opponent; he was a GM. And Kasparov was only 14 years old at the time.

Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Here is the position after the potential line 33. Rxc7 Bxb2 34. Rc5 Nb7 35 Rc8+ Kf7 36 Rc7+ Ke6 37 Rxb7.


click for larger view

At the puzzle position I thought white only potentially wins an exchange but in this case after black's move 37 white takes the passed pawn and now his passed a pawn is a major threat.

Jul-06-21  timeclimber: <keypusher: No, because if 34.Rc8+ Kf7 35.Rc5 Bc3 Black wins. White needs to keep the check on c8 in reserve.>

Ah, never mind and please disregard my earlier comments. You're right, after 35..Bc3 36.Bxc3 b2! wins because White can't play Rb7 after Rc7+ due to the Knight on a5.

This is not an easy Tuesday puzzle!

Jul-06-21  alshatranji: timeclimber: <Black is not a random opponent; he was a GM. And Kasparov was only 14 years old at the time.>

Well, Kharitonov was 18 at the time, and not even an IM yet. So it seems Kasparov did get lucky.

Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  raymondhow: < TheBish: Actually, no! After I solved it, I was thinking the same thing. But it's necessary to save the back rank check (Rc8+) for tempo to play Rb8 and not Rb7, as that square is covered by the knight on a5. > Thanks. As others have said, pretty tough for a Tuesday.
Jul-06-21  Walter Glattke: Test: 32.-Ba3 33.Rxc7 Bxb2 34.Rc5 Bc3 35.Rxc3 b2 36.Rc8+ Kf7 37.Rb8 Nc4 (agb A3) 38.a5 b1Q 39.Rxb1 Nd2+ 40.Kd3 Nxb1 41.Kd3 Na3 42.a6 Nb5 43.Kc4 Na7 44.Kc5 Ke7 45.Kb6 Nc8 46.Kc7 Nd6 47.Kc6 Nc8 ... What he says? "This is not an easy Tuesday puzzle" ... taking the fork Nd2-Rb1-Ke3 is really complicated, A3 from agb is interesting
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Hello Walter good news no
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Bide my time x no?
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: Thanks <1g1yy> and <Teyss>.
Jul-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: This whole thing works because of a back rank check possibility. Otherwise 34...Bc3 and the pawn promotes. The zwischenzug check allows white to get behind the pawn.

If black tries to preempt the check (say 35...Kf7), it still uses the needed tempo.

Jul-06-21  Brown: This seems aesthetically Karpovian: the shuttling of the R along the c-file, harassing or capturing two pawns, two pieces, and the K, depending on which square it rests.
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