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Garry Kasparov vs Anatoly Karpov
Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Rematch (1986), London ENG / Leningrad URS, rd 2, Jul-30
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Three Knights Variation (E21)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-13-04  percyblakeney: Kasparov missed 39.Rc7, threatening to take on d7 and then check on e5.
Oct-13-04  notyetagm: Yep, this Kaspy missed win is in the recent McDonald book called <Mastering Chess Tactics>. Kaspy missed a simple pinning of the defending knight to the enemy king.
Dec-12-06  Kharjov: Umm...
39.Rc7 Rc3!
40.Nxe5 Rxc6
41.Nxc6 Kd6
42.Nd4 Ke5 42.Nd8?? Ne5!
43.Ke3 Nf6

What Now How can White hold the pawn. If he loses it he'll be at a disadvantage because of blacks active king and well placed knight. Blacks Kingside pawns are more advanced giving him an edge in any sort of race.

44.Nc6+ Kd6(44.Nb8?? Kc7 45.Nxa6 Kb7)
45.Nd4 Ke5
46.Nc6+ Kd6
47.Nd4 1/2-1/2

Dec-12-06  Kharjov: Ne3 was played to prevent simplifycation such as this but the game was still drawn. I didn't get out a board or anything so it's possible that my anaylis is like my spelling.
Dec-13-06  procumbo: Kharjov-
your second move for black is already illegal: white's rook is on c7, not c6. The simplest answer to Rc3 seems to be 40. Kd2 Rb3 41. Kc2 Rf3 42. Rxd7+ Kxd7 43. Nxe5+ Ke6 44. Nxf3 gxf3 44. Kd3 Ke5 45. Ke3 f2 46. Kxf2 Kxe4 47. h3 and White wins easily.
Oct-16-07  notyetagm: <percyblakeney: Kasparov missed 39.Rc7, threatening to take on d7 and then check on e5. >

Position after 38 ... ♖f8-f3?:


click for larger view

Here Kasparov played 39 ... ♘c4-e3?! rather than playing the -winning(!)- 39 ♖c6-c7!.

(VAR) Position after 39 ♖c6-c7! :


click for larger view

Black has no good response to the twin threats of <REINFORCING THE PIN> with 40 ♘c4xb6 winning a piece and the <KNIGHT FORK> combination 40 ♖c7x♘d7+! ♔e7x♖d7 41 ♘c4xe5+ ♔d7-e6 42 ♘e5x♖f3 g4xf3 43 ♔e2xf3 which wins two pawns and yields a trivial pawn ending win.

(VAR) Position after 40 ♖c7x♘d7+! ♔e7x♖d7 41 ♘c4xe5+ ♔d7-e6 42 ♘e5x♖f3 g4xf3 43 ♔e2xf3:


click for larger view

Jun-29-09  Knight13: After seeing how White piled up on the queen side 14... O-O-O might've been more useful. Because then Black wouldn't have to stick his rook on b8.
Nov-25-10  Eyal: Kasparov says in his book on the match that even though he didn’t manage to win this game it was an important landmark for him, since it showed that he could outplay Karpov in "Karpovian" style – that is, in the kind of play based on squeezing out apparently minimal positional advantages, which was considered as Karpov’s specialty.

With all of Black’s questionable moves in the endgame mentioned by Kasparov in his notes, he thinks the game was still within the drawing range up to move 38, where ...Rf3?? allows the winning 39.Rc7! (missed by Kasparov in time trouble). Instead, 38...b5! should draw: 39.Ne3 (or 39.Nd6 Rf6 40.Nf5+ Kd8) 39...Nf6 40.Rxa6 (40.Nd5+ Nxd5 41.exd5 Rf3 42.Re6+ Kd7 43.Rxe5 Rxa3 44.Rxh5 Kd6) 40...Nxe4 41.Nd5+ Kd7 42.Rh6 Rf5 43.Rh8 Kd6 44.Rd8+ Ke6 45.Nc7+ Ke7 46.Rd3 (otherwise Nc3+) 46...Nf6 47.Nd5+ (47.Nxb5? e4) 47...Ke6 48.Nc3 e4 49.Rd4 Rf3 50.Nxb5 (50.Nxe4 Ke5) 50...h4! 51.gxh4 Rh3.

Mar-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Everett: <Eyal: Kasparov says in his book on the match that even though he didn’t manage to win this game it was an important landmark for him, since it showed that he could outplay Karpov in "Karpovian" style – that is, in the kind of play based on squeezing out apparently minimal positional advantages, which was considered as Karpov’s specialty.>

And this is what made Kasparov so great. Kramnik seems to peg Kasparov perfectly: he picks up everything about chess like a sponge and fixes any weaknesses quickly.

Dec-12-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <Kasparov says in his book on the match that even though he didn’t manage to win this game it was an important landmark for him, since it showed that he could outplay Karpov in "Karpovian" style>

Well, I don't see much of outplaying Karpov in "Karpovian" style here. Karpov got quite difficult 2R+B+N ending right from the opening (later transformed into R+B+N and then R+N) where all white pieces were better than their counterparts giving white clear edge but he (i.e. Gazza) did not make any significant progress in increasing the advantage and in fact the game was near to equality when Karpov suddenly blundered with 38...Rf3?? and Gazza just missed the given chance to win (both were in time troubles then). Gazza is right that after 38...b5 black should be able to hold the game with optimal play, which a bit contradicts his boasting about outplaying Karpov in this game.

Dec-12-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  penarol: <Eyal> You give 2 question marks to 38...Rf3(??) but you say that Garry missed 39. Rc7 because of time trouble. So 38...Rf3 couldn´t be for time trouble too? I agree on this point with Honza Cervenka. Please be fair!
Dec-19-18  Howard: Timman has just come out with (another) book, called Longest Game. It's about the five K-K matches. Contains a lot of good background material it appears.

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