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Miguel Illescas Cordoba vs Stuart Rachels
New York op (1987), New York, NY USA, Apr-??
Sicilian Defense: Dragon. Classical Variation Battery Variation (B73)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-07-13  fokers13: Got it in seconds.

One of my proudest Wednesday puzzles,it was very neat.

Aug-07-13  TheaN: Wednesday 7 August 2013

<26.?>

This end with one such moves you later think that it simply cannot work. However, if there is one factor in chess that can screw over positions completely it's the pin. Both active and non-active. This is exactly what is shown in this combination.

White has the backrank threats over the e- and f-file, black does over the d-file. Removal of one piece will likely lead to mate. On top of this, white has to solve the threat of Qxe2.

A gross blunder would be 26.Qxe5?. Of course, 26....fxe5 27.Rf8# facilitates the white threat. However, 26....Qxf1+ 27.Kh2 fxe5 does so for black's. Instaed, white should go for:

<26.Rxf6!> now, 26....Bxf6 27.Qe8# is mate likewise, but the alternative to capture is no check and mates too: 26....Qxe2 27.Rf8#. Defending f8 overloads the black rook or loses the queen: 26....Rd8/Rf7/Bd6 27.Qxd3 . The check on d1, however, is the point of this combination.

<26....Qd1+ 27.Rf1!> 27.Qxd1 is mate for black, 27.Qf1 Bxf6 . This however, counters the check and wins despite generating a pin. The black queen is en prise, removing it from the 1st rank leads to Rf8+/#, keep it on the 1st rank leads to RxQ. One other option for black to keep the position as it is and create a new threat:

<27....Rd2!? 28.Qxd1 > fails, because now the black queen is attacked twice. Nice combo.

Aug-07-13  Marmot PFL: This is fairly simple. It looks like Rachels was expecting an easy draw and relaxed too soon.
Aug-07-13  Strongest Force: Cute rook play. What ever happened to Rachels? 
Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: This puzzle looks similar to the Opera Mate.

At first I was thinking of sacrificing the queen on e5, but then black captures the rook on f1 with check, and the queen is lost.

Then, I thought about capturing f6, although I didn't quite see Qd1+. :|

Aug-07-13  Alex56171: 26.Rxf6!
The white pieces are so well placed that any reply from Black loses material or gets checkmate. For instance:
26...Bxf6 27.Qe8#
26...Qxe2 27.Rf8#
26...Qb1+ 27.Rf1 Rd2 Bxd2
26...Rd8 27.Qxd3
Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I LOOKED at 26 ♕xe5,but played instead the correct 26 ♖xf6 which wins quickly.
Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: And address the issue go f6 light in a foilable,

ascendancy flow f1 rook a find off one aint h6 and,

d2 will tow in flurry the queen trap d3 circuit other indeed a weight of had bind might win e2,

over came level off dilly dips king had queen you,

in double doot mercurials one hacking ha frayed,

rope a nut queend3 crazy a highball snatch one
bindfamily effectives over affabled effect scuff,

26.Rxf6 at go off ballz up in blacks court he land,

a punch h6 blowing sham rook island although as,

tensed 26...Bxf6 reflex evermore queen mates in e8,

to shoot d3xe2 and plays f6 in f8 again mates crawl,

over done at dasher 26...Qd1+ mage threatens h2,

diagonals cut tell fish a f6 back bog in f1 winning,

formula soon e2 monarch stays put kind for appraisals again stencil it each in glowing 27.rf1#

Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <avidfan> < 27...Qd6 does not protect the B/e5 since 28.Qxe5 overloads the queen which must also keep watch on f8 to avoid 29 Rf8 mate.>

<prn: Actually, it's even worse than that for Black. 27...Qd6 28.Rf8+ Qxf8 29.Bxf8 and White now has Q for R.>

Actually, it's even worse than that for Black. After 27...Qd6 28.Qxe5:


click for larger view

Exactly how is Black to avoid mate after 29.Qe8+ without allowing one of White's other latent mate threats (Rf8#, Qg7#) to appear?

Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Intuitively went with Qxe5 and took a few seconds to realize that didn't work. Rxf6 is the same idea and wins. The theme isn't an overworked piece, but an overworked pair of pieces, the black square pieces of f6 and e5.
Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: My first impulse was 26.Qxe5??, but 26.Rxf6! is much stronger and surprisingly crushing.
Aug-07-13  GauraNitai: @M.Hassan: After Qd6, I think Qxe5 wins rapidly, no? More forcing than exchanging the queen for rook and bishop. In fact I don't see how black can stop mate after Qxe5.

Better than Qd6 maybe Qxf1+, leaving black as you said, with a rook against queen and pawn.

Aug-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Strongest Force> Rachels lost all his hair and became a philosophy professor at the University of Alabama. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart... http://www.jamesrachels.org/stuart/ http://philosophy.ua.edu/home/facul... http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/Sho...
Aug-07-13  jffun1958: 26. Rxf6
a) 26. ... Bxf6 27. Qe8#
b) 26. ... Qd1+ 27. Rf1
c) 26. ... Rd8 27. Qxd3
d) 26. ... else 27. Rf8#
Aug-07-13  Harvestman: Curious. I visualised the sequence 26.Rxf6 Rf7 (I saw the other variations) 27.Qxe5 defending the rook and with loads of threats. White is up a piece and a pawn.

Somehow I missed that the black queen is en-prise instead on move 27.

My line works anyway though, as I don't see a way for black to defend all the threats, and white can exchange into an easily winning endgame.

Aug-07-13  BOSTER: <sfm> <Anyone can see that 24.Bh6 and 25.Rf1 creates primitive threats towards the back rank>.

Untill we have the untouchable shield from triangle Qd6-Be5-pawn f6, we really should not see such threat. Looking at the beautiful blonde can you see what she has under your clothes?

If all chess masters could see all threats, I don't think that we should have <CG Puzzle>.

Aug-07-13  M.Hassan: <GauraNiti: @M.Hassan: After Qd6, I think Qxe5 wins rapidly, no? More forcing than exchanging the queen for rook and bishop. In fact I don't see how black can stop mate after Qxe5.>

Right!. I did'nt see that:

27..........Qd6
28.Qxe5 Qe7
29.Qxe7 Rxe7
30.Rf8#

Aug-07-13  JohnAnthony: Cool post <Abdel Irada>
Aug-07-13  Nullifidian: Pretty easy to get the key move here. 26. ♖xf6 threatens mate in 1 if Black takes the queen (♖f8#) or the rook (♕e8#). The best continuation is to trade the queen for the rook, which still leaves White with the decisive edge.

26... ♕d1+
27. ♖f1 ♕xf1
28. ♕xf1 ♗g7
29. ♗xg7

And now Black doesn't have enough resources to save the game.

Aug-07-13  sfm: <BOSTER: Looking at the beautiful blonde can you see what she has under your clothes?> Is she wearing _my_ clothes? Well, in that case, the easiest way to get the knowledge of what she has, is to demand that she takes them off right away!
Aug-07-13  sfm: <BOSTER: If all chess masters could see all threats, I don't think that we should have CG Puzzle.> Well, we could in principle - but as they all would be "how-to-draw" puzzles, you are right, the interest would die out.
Aug-08-13  Abdel Irada: <FSR: <Strongest Force> Rachels lost all his hair and became a philosophy professor at the University of Alabama.>

Are you suggesting that baldness causes philosophy?

For the benefit of the forum, could you express that theory in the form of a structurally valid two-premise syllogism, one of whose premises is improbable and the other unprovable? ;-)

Aug-08-13  DoctorD: I don't know what the philosophers call it, but the physicists call it the inverse hair law.
Aug-08-13  Abdel Irada: <DoctorD: I don't know what the philosophers call it, but the physicists call it the inverse hair law.>

I'm sorry, Doctor, but your answer must be in the form of a structurally valid two-premise syllogism, as described above. Please try again.

Aug-08-13  Abdel Irada: <Please try again.>

After all, we must not fall short of the standard set on <Kenneth Rogoff> over most of the past month.

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