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Bent Larsen vs Robert James Fischer
Second Piatigorsky Cup (1966), Santa Monica, CA USA, rd 15, Aug-10
King's Indian Defense: Averbakh. Benoni Defense Advance Variation (E75)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-19-04  Whitehat1963: Fischer gives Larsen a lesson in the opening of the day.
Sep-12-05  iron maiden: 25. gxf5, keeping the e-file closed, was probably better for White.
Mar-17-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Black's 11....Nh5 is an improvement over the dubious 11....b5 of Najdorf-Fischer from round seven, though much of Fischer's subsequent play in that game could also have been improved.
Mar-17-06  Fan of Leko: Indeed 25 gf5 looks much better. ef5 leaves white with two pairs of doubled pawns as well as the isolated d pawn. Larsen was known for his sometimes eccentric moves. I wonder if Bobby would have taken a draw if larsen had played 19 Bb5 (instead of f3).
Aug-01-07  engmaster: 17) ...,bd7 would be a positional mistake due to giving up control over f4
Sep-03-07  Cripto: In this game Fischer he finds the best position, Larsen has a passive attitude.
Aug-20-08  Ulhumbrus: On Larsen - Fischer, Santa Monica 1966

It is not obvious that the move 27...Nd7!! is intended to take advantage of White's K at f1.

27...Nd7 prepares to occupy the e file by ...Re8, ..Re8-e3 and ...Rbe8.

The White N on e4 which obstructs the e file will be attacked by ...Nf6.

This suggests that Black offers to exchange his magnificently placed N on e5 for White's well placed N on e4, but in a way that enables him to take the e file thereafter.

White is unable to contest Black's plan because of his K on f1.

This suggests that with the move 27 …Nd7 Black takes advantage of the poor emplacement of White's King at f1 not by trying to attack the White King directly, but less obviously, by beginning a plan which White is unable to contest because of the King at f1. It is in this way that Black exacts a price for the poor emplacement of White's King.

Fischer was a clever fellow, was he not?

Jul-28-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: Larsen could have had the draw on move 18 but it seems it was the Dane and not Fischer playing at all costs to win.
Nov-27-10  jerseybob: Fan of Leko: Fischer definitely would not have taken a draw after 19.Bb5. No way! Especially after having suffered his first loss ever to Larsen in the preceding leg of the tourney.
Apr-15-12  newzild: <Ulhumbrus: On Larsen - Fischer, Santa Monica 1966

It is not obvious that the move 27...Nd7!! is intended to take advantage of White's K at f1.>

I think it more likely that Fischer simply wanted to challenge White's strongest piece (the Ne4) and occupy the only open file with his rooks. This would be a standard plan in this position.

Apr-15-12  King Death: < newzild: Ulhumbrus: On Larsen - Fischer, Santa Monica 1966 It is not obvious that the move 27...Nd7!! is intended to take advantage of White's K at f1.>

But it is obvious that White's knight is his only good piece, if the knights get exchanged the opposite colored bishops will mean that Black might as well be up a piece in this middle game.

<I think it more likely that Fischer simply wanted to challenge White's strongest piece (the Ne4) and occupy the only open file with his rooks. This would be a standard plan in this position.>

Once Fischer carries out this plan White has no counterplay, this is a Modern Benoni player's dream and all without even playing ....b7-b5.

Apr-15-12  SChesshevsky: <<I think it more likely that Fischer simply wanted to challenge White's strongest piece (the Ne4)>>

Probably, as exchanging on f6 looks better for Black.

Fischer's plan might also include the tempo move of White pieces to awkward defence. 28...Nf6 attacks the weak d5, 29...Qd7 the weak a4, and 30...Qc7 the weak a5, then with control of the e-file and dark square strength and White pieces poorly placed he can then invade and let the tactics flow.

Jul-07-15  mikrohaus: Am I crazy or is 21.Kf1 crazy?

If W fears 21.0-0-0 and feels the need to be k-side w/ his K, then 21.Kf2 seems better.

At least it allows a supported push of the Pg2 to g3.

Was it a fingerfehler?

Jul-07-15  RookFile: Well, Kf2 invites ...Bd4 at some point from black. Maybe he prepares it with ...a6 first (to stop Nb5). Don't know, it's kind of late.
Apr-12-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: I think White's position starts to go down hill after the committal Nf5 move. The reason is that the perk of the e4 square for White is only temporary. As Fischer shows, once the e4 knight is later parried, black has the ability to both intensify the dark square pressure and also play for h5 to further compromise White's pawn structure. Pawn's don't go backward and Nf5 commits to a pawn structure that is essentially underminable.

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