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Oldrich Duras vs Aron Nimzowitsch
San Sebastian (1912), San Sebastian ESP, rd 8, Feb-29
Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation (B12)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-19-03  rohanaj22: A thoroughly enjoyable game, especially the end-game. I'm just in love with this caro-kann defence!
Nov-19-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Duras was perfectly "cooperative" with Nimzowitsch in this game. The ending K/R/4P vs K/R/3P was clearly drawish.
Nov-19-03  Calli: Yes, even in 1912, they knew better than 57.Rg5? f5 immobilizing the rook.
Feb-23-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: Quite a swindle by Nimzowitsch (of an unusual type: playing on in a drawn position and eventually boring his opponent into carelessness).

Here is Duras on the winning side of a swindle in a rook endgame: Spielmann vs Duras, 1907

Feb-09-12  King Death: <Honza Cervenka: ...The ending K/R/4P vs K/R/3P was clearly drawish.>

Once White plays 30.h4 this ending should be held without any problems, that's the key idea. Even if the defender didn't understand the drawing technique and somehow allowed Black to play ...h7-h5-h4 it can still be drawn but it's harder.

Feb-09-12  RookFile: The rook is a long distance piece, it should be kept on a5 or b5, with pawns on f2, g3 and h4 as Duras has here. If white does this, he has a can't lose position.
Feb-10-12  drukenknight: I know its bad but any chance w/ 66 Kxe6?
Feb-10-12  Shams: <druk> 66...Kxe6 67.Rxg4 and 68...Rxh4 with the connected rook- and knight- passers-- a trivial win at this level, but there is a tiny bit of technique required against good defense. Silman spends time on it in his "Complete Endgame Course".
Feb-11-12  drukenknight: I dont think it so trivial, Dvoretsky says the main chance to stop connected passers in this situation is if K can blockade (p 157 of his Endgame Manual); in your line 67..Kf6 will support the Rook. So we have

66...Kxe6
67 Rxg4 Kf6
68 Rxh4 Rxg6+
69 Kh7 Rg7+

Is this trivial? I havent stuck it in the pc or really studied it but gee...you guys think stuff is so easy

Feb-11-12  King Death: < drukenknight: I dont think it so trivial, Dvoretsky says the main chance to stop connected passers in this situation is if K can blockade (p 157 of his Endgame Manual); in your line 67..Kf6 will support the Rook. So we have 66...Kxe6
67 Rxg4 Kf6
68 Rxh4 Rxg6+
69 Kh7 Rg7+>

After 66. Ke6, 66...Rg4 67.Kf6 Rg5 68.hg+ Kh7 69.Ke5 Kg7 wins.

Feb-11-12  drukenknight: I'll get back to this tomorrow..Hey KD any chance you want to a thematic survey of games? Like Tal in the French or Rubinstein in the Semi Slav?
Feb-12-12  drukenknight: KD I think your notation above is off, when you say 66...Rg4 you meant to say 67 Rxg4? yes? maybe double check? I'll try to see if there's any play left in this..
Feb-12-12  drukenknight: ok, I think KD is saying that this line:

66...Kxe6
67 Rxg4 Kf6
68 Rg5 hxg+

white wins easily because of the connected passed pawns. so that's all true. So now I am left with seeing if there's anything else for black here.

Feb-13-12  drukenknight: well wait, if white can control the distant opposition he can actually draw. This is covered on p. 50 of Dvoretsky's book with similar pawn structure and Kings somewhat distant.

I messed up the notation, so let's get the right line/notation:

66 Kxe6 Rxg4
67 Kf6 Rg5
68 hxg+ Kh7 (only move)
69 Ke5 Kg7
70 Kf4
producing this position:

black to move.


click for larger view

white has to move in such a way to avoid getting into distant opposition. For the moment, his pawn on g5 helps as it covers f6 so the black K cant get there.

It looks bad because blacks h pawn will race to queen, and then his K will grab the last white pawn on g5. HOwever, the neat part and the idea is that when white takes that pawn on h2, he has to come back to stop the g pawn by taking the opposition. Let's make a possible position after the h pawn races to queen and white grabs it on h2:

black to move, looks scary, this is the kind of position you worry about as you calculate.


click for larger view

But now if 1...Kf5 2 Kh3 (2 Kg3 loses) Kxg5 3 Kg3

And so black has the passed pawn, but he does not have the opposition and that is draw. The thing to remember is that you can drop that pawn but if you keep the opposition you can draw.

This could certainly stand a double check if there be some what for black to maneuver to produce distant opposition.

Feb-15-12  Shams: <drukenknight> While the pawn ending is interesting, simply 67.Kf6 Rf4+ and then capturing on h4 next move gives the rook ending with connected passers that I was talking about.
Feb-15-12  drukenknight: Ok that is strong, let's see if there's anyway to save this....
Aug-02-18  nr77man: 66. K×e6 R×g4
67. Kf6? Rf4+ (and not R×h4 directly)
68. Ke5 R×h4

and now black is winning easily with 2 powerful connected passed pawns.

Nov-20-19  zydeco: What is going on with 61.Ke5?? If the king goes backwards, isn't it a simple draw?
Nov-20-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <zydeco>
At first glance, 61. Ke3 <Rg4> forces a rook trade and what looks, at first glance, like a winning king and pawn ending for Black. If there's a simple draw, I'm not finding it. Can you post a line to illustrate your idea?
Nov-21-19  zydeco: <Beatgiant> You're right.
Nov-21-19  zydeco: The key line is 61.Ke3 Rg4 62.f4 g6 63.Kd4 Kg7 64.Ke5 Kf7 65.Kd6 Kf6
Oct-25-21  tonsillolith: <King Death: <Honza Cervenka: ...The ending K/R/4P vs K/R/3P was clearly drawish.>

Once White plays 30.h4 this ending should be held without any problems, that's the key idea. Even if the defender didn't understand the drawing technique and somehow allowed Black to play ...h7-h5-h4 it can still be drawn but it's harder.>

Where does one obtain knowledge about this sort of thing? Is the best way to read one of the tomes about various endgame positions? Dvoretsky's endgame manual, or something?

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