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Tigran V Petrosian vs Mikhail Botvinnik
"Botvinnik and Paid For" (game of the day Oct-27-2008)
Botvinnik - Petrosian World Championship Match (1963), Moscow URS, rd 5, Apr-01
Gruenfeld Defense: Three Knights. Burille Variation (D94)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-12-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Petrosianic> Never seen an ebook of any kind in my life, and it's been ten years or more since I read my copy of the Vasiliev book, but I believe the passage mentioned something about Botvinnik claiming White had sealed '41.K-B8??'. Ah, the good old days of English descriptive notation.

That story regarding Rubinstein deliberately sealing an impossible move, true or not, is amusing.

Jul-12-11  Karpova: <Petrosianic: I hadn't heard it told Botvinnik's way. He says that the move was definitely written wrong. Not having seen the scoresheet, it's hard to judge.>

I wouldn't agree with that judgement considering what Botvinnik says: <Then I demanded a photocopy of the score sheet. This was provided a week later. All week I was nervous and managed to lose yet another game. However, the unpleasantness lay in the fact that although Petrosian had written the move down inaccurately there could be no doubt about deciding what move had been sealed, and Petrosian had complete justification for his protest at the adjournment.>

He says <inaccurately> and not <definitely wrong> and he also thought that Golombek could have made the correct move after reading the sealed note (<there could be no doubt about deciding what move had been sealed>). So he wasn't angry with Petrosian or even felt cheated but thought that a fuss had been made out of nothing.

Jul-12-11  Karpova: C.N. 7146

<Peter Wood (Hastings, England) cites the note to 41 Kf7 on page 147 of 'Tigran Petrosian His Life and Games' by Vik L. Vasiliev (London, 1974):

‘Undoubtedly the strongest, which unexpectedly called forth a protest from the opponent. Here Botvinnik turned to the match arbiter and claimed that White had sealed the impossible move 41 K-B8?? (into check!).

One of Petrosian’s “small weaknesses” is that he has a habit of writing the number 7 with a round tail ... in a word, the mediation of the judge was called for, and after the truth of the matter was established, play continued. The nervous strain of a hard match sometimes produces the most unexpected conflicts!’>

Link: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Jul-12-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: Ah, you know what? I bet I looked in the wrong place. I looked in the chapter "Ninth Champion". Probably that story is in the notes to the game itself. My e-copy only has the chapter text. I made it when I was trying to test some text recognition software, and, although it worked fine for plain text, it was useless in copying game scores.

Maybe I'm reading Botvinnik wrong, but to say that the scoresheet was written "inaccurately" sounds like he's saying "it definitely said 8, even though it wasn't intended to". And the way he seems to tell it, he definitely should have had the win, but Golombek just didn't like that rule, and so didn't enforce it. He says he was nervous that whole week until he saw the scoresheet.

Maybe he meant to say "ambiguously", rather than inaccurately.

Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Petrosianic: ....Probably that story is in the notes to the game itself.>

That's true, and I didn't mention it in my response.

Jul-13-11  Karpova: <Petrosianic: Maybe I'm reading Botvinnik wrong, but to say that the scoresheet was written "inaccurately" sounds like he's saying "it definitely said 8, even though it wasn't intended to". And the way he seems to tell it, he definitely should have had the win, but Golombek just didn't like that rule, and so didn't enforce it. He says he was nervous that whole week until he saw the scoresheet.>

But Botvinnik also says <and Petrosian had complete justification for his protest at the adjournment.> and <I felt bitter at my old friends, the match judges. I just couldn’t understand why they had created such a groundless conflict.>

So Botvinnik says that Petrosian was correct (therefore that 41.Kf7 was correct) and that the arbiters had created a <groundless conflict> which doesn't sound to me as if Botvinnik thought he desereved the win according to the rules. He was nervous but once he saw the scoresheet he knew that everything had been correct.

Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: All right, maybe I'm still reading him wrong. But

<After my loss in this game I approached Golombek for an explanation (according to the rules if the judge is doubtful about which move has been made, i.e. if there is an inaccuracy in the writing, then a loss is awarded). Golombek replied that the move was indeed not clear, but he was not in agreement with such an interpretation of the rules. I was infuriated. This legal point had been decided when I was still a young man.>

This sounds like he's saying that he was right and should have gotten a forfeit, but Golombek practiced "judicial activism" and ignored a rule he didn't like.

<Then I demanded a photocopy of the score sheet. This was provided a week later. All week I was nervous and managed to lose yet another game. However, the unpleasantness lay in the fact that although Petrosian had written the move down inaccurately there could be no doubt about deciding what move had been sealed,>

This sounds like he's saying that the move was written wrongly, but there could be no doubt about the intention.

<and Petrosian had complete justification for his protest at the adjournment.>

That part doesn't sound like he expected a forfeit, but if the move really had been written down inaccurately, that was the rule, wasn't it? There could be no doubt about what was <intended>, but is that or isn't it what was actually written? Vasiliev says it was, but that Petrosian wrote funny 7's with tails. Botvinnik says it wasn't, and that the move was written inaccurately. As I understand it, if that's the case, he really should have gotten a forfeit. On the other hand, saying that Petrosian was "correct" in his protest seems to contradict that. I think I'm confused.

Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Petrosianic>
Maybe Botvinnik wrote that the move was written <неаккур&- #1072;тно>, which might mean more like <untidily> instead of <inaccurately>. It would be easy to translate that <inaccurately>, hence leading to the confusion...
Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: не-
аккурат-
но

Uh-oh, looks like it was posted untidily above....

Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: "Untidily" makes a lot more sense.
Jul-13-11  TheFocus: Is "messily" a word? Would Botvinnik have said "messily?"

In Russian, of course.

Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Of course messily is a word: http://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C...
Jul-13-11  TheFocus: Thanks <FSR>. That tidies that up.
Jul-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Cold War Misha almost outlived Bobby Fischer. He must have ate his vegetables and laid off the vodka.
Aug-06-11  Tigranny: Did Petrosian take his king on long marches more often than other opponents did in his days?
Aug-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Very smooth ending. Was this the final game of the '63 match, that ended MB's reign?
Nov-16-11  birthtimes: Botvinnik was most likely expecting 8.O-O rather than 8.d5, since 8.O-O had been played in games they both would have been familiar with by Kotkov in 1961, Gligoric in 1957, and Smyslov in 1953. It appears that 8.d5 had only been played once previous to this game, way back in 1946.
Mar-24-12  Eduardo Bermudez: White King 1, Black King 0
Apr-11-13  Rick11: First succes for Whites : the "ç" pawn of Botvinnik is isolated; in fact I think the most important mistake was to exchange his Bishop again the Knight of Petrossian that will be the "king" of chessboard...with the help of White's King himself !
Apr-11-13  Rick11: 24.b5 !
Apr-11-13  Rick11: 33...,Rh1 ?? For me, the principal reason of Botvinnik's lost, he had the ultimate possibility to exchange his poor bishop against the knight of his opponent. So, 33...,BxNç3 ! was the last chance to save this five game of the match. The rest of the game is a lesson of strategy, a very great game. In fact, one of my favorite's games ever played in the history of chess. No stonish moves, but the better lesson of strategy for any player ! N.B. : Petrossian played two games in witch he demonstrate his very great talent of tactician !! Let's never forget this two other games, one with each colour. In 1963, a belgium's player wroted, in a newspaper, that this match was without interest ! What a pity !
Apr-11-13  Rick11: In my first note,one must read : "was NOT to exchange..." Sorry !
Mar-13-14  maxi: Botvinnik's move 33...Rh1? bothers me. He was an excellent endgame player. I find it hard to understand how he could miss a chance of exchanging his sorry Bishop for the wonderful Knight. After 34.Ne4 Black is cooked and served.
May-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ulhumbrus: Black's c pawn becomes a target instead of a weapon. This suggests that Black has to get ready for White's thrust b4 by ...a6 and ...b5
Jun-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Quite early in the game white plays 17.♘c3:e4


click for larger view

That knight makes two quick excursions to d2 and c3, but both times quickly goes back to e4. When Petrosian eventually plays 46.Ng5...


click for larger view

...the game is very nearly over.

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