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Wilhelm Steinitz vs Joseph Henry Blackburne
"Black Burned" (game of the day Jan-02-2009)
Steinitz - Blackburne m (1862), London ENG, rd 1, Dec-15
Formation: Hippopotamus (A00)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-01-04  Knight13: Nice ending. G0od game.
Mar-12-05  ksadler: A beautiful finish by Steinitz!
Aug-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: Blackburne's 50...f4? looked tempting, but after 51.a5 Kc8 52.a6 Kb8 53.b4, Black could not play 53...Re6, because White had a mate with 54.Bxe6 e2 55.Kb6!.

Instead of 50...f4?, Black could have drawn with 50...Re6!

After 50...Re6! 51.Be2 Re5 52.b4 Re4 53.a5 Rxb4 54.a6 Rb3 55.a7 Ra3 56.Kb6 Kd7, the position is equal.

White can vary with 53.b5 Rxa4 54.b6 Ra8 55.b7 Rb8 56.Bd1, but this position is also equal.

In this variation, White must be careful, because if 53.b5 Rxa4 54.b6 Ra8 55.b7 Rb8 56.Kb6? Kd7!, and Black will win!

Jan-02-09  zzzzzzzzzzzz: nice game
Jan-02-09  DwayneMeller: Although black should hold this ending perhaps this reminds me of a 19th century Kasparov against an "I don't even come close" opponet. 1Blackburne does not have the technique although this is hardly his fault as most technique had yet to be developed 2In Kasparov's case his opponet's were no match-he fought harder prepped harder was more imaginative and the beatings they received often stopped them finding the best defence (as is the case in many of the games in <Kasparov's fighting chess 1993-1998> where his opponets did not find equalising game holding or winning sequences (though many of these are insanely difficult) due to their beating
Jan-02-09  Jack Kerouac: Discovered-check in, chess community.
Still here in 2009. Unlike my favorite,Fischer. Steinitz was Fischer's favorite too. Look for more of my scintilating commentary on the rank and files of the new year....
Jan-02-09  psmith: It appears Black had winning chances with an immediate 49...f4. Lines are complicated but Black should draw at worst and may win.
Jan-02-09  WhiteRook48: this pun was hilarious. Oh and I thought Steinitz wasn't Fischer's favorite, I thought Morphy was. I remember Morphy pulling off the same tactic in a different game
Jan-02-09  psmith: No, not so complicated; 49...f4 wins for Black.

49... f4 50. a5 ♔d7 51. a6 ♖f8 52. a7 g4 53. ♗e2 ♔xd6 54. ♔b7 ♔e5 55. a8=♕ ♖xa8 56. ♔xa8 ♔e4 57. b4 f3

Jan-02-09  TheChessGuy: Nice game by Herr Steinitz! Great pun, too.
Jan-02-09  WhiteRook48: Blackburne got burned, he was black, and black got burned and black's pieces were burned! :)
Jan-02-09  Ychromosome: If. 42...e2 43.Rh8+ Kf7 44.Rxe8 Kxe8 45.Kd2 and black will lose his passed pawn.
Jan-02-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Black-BurneD. A great win by Steinitz!
Jan-02-09  YoungEd: Black's opening choice is a bit hard to understand, since Blackburne was such a great tactician in open games. Steinitz does a great job throughout.
Jan-02-09  Jack Kerouac: <White Rook 48> Yes Morphy was admired by Fischer, much. But Steinitz was the early master he could learn 'subtilties' from. And he did incorporate quite a few of the old master's late century innovations into his mid-60's repertoire. Specifically defensive position in an age of 'romantic-style' attacking chess play. Note his game with Spassky- 3rd game of the 1972 World Championship match where Fischer played a Benoni and made the 'anti-positional' move..11..N-H5. Larry Evan's comment on the move in his very good book on the match:'Chess World Championship 1972'; "Fischer's secrete move. It seems weak at first sight as White can (and does) play BxN, forcing..PxB with a consequent scattering of Black's K-side Pawn structure. However, Fischer has seen deeply into the position, realizing that White's pieces cannot attack or otherwise take advantage of these pawns....." This was a typical 'Steinitz-type' move in deep waters and gave Robert his first victory against Spassky ever and first victory in the match being down 2 games to nill. This is exactly what I mean by Steinitz influence on R.F.
Jan-02-09  Gambit All: Aren't Black's first 8 moves the Hippopotamus Opening? Slow, or lumbering like a hippo - the pawns, Knights and Bishops all under developed; and, in appearance, the Knights resemble the eyes of a hippo and the Bishops kind of look like the ears. I think this was an off hand game and Blackburne's whimsical opening was him playing to win - and in part the opening was concocted to irritate the serious Steinitz - but, also he was just screwing around.
Jan-02-09  Gambit All: Blackburne's nickname was "The Black Death" for his quick mating attacks. In a Horowitz book he titles a Steinitz-Blackburne game "Death of the Black Death."
Jan-02-09  Jack Kerouac: http://straightupchess.com/
Happy New Year
Jan-02-09  Andrijadj: Entertaining,but not good...At first,white let black escape with his horrendeous setup...then black blew a drawish ending...
Jan-02-09  xrt999: 28.Rxe5 just trades rooks and gives black the passed pawn. I dont see the logic. Unfortunately black misses the win.

< psmith: No, not so complicated; 49...f4 wins for Black.>

or 49...h4

Jul-16-09  Artemi: An elegant finish by Steinitz! I can't believe it was played in the 19th century! Steinitz is well ahead of his time! He is like a chess god!
Feb-01-12  AVRO38: <I think this was an off hand game and Blackburne's whimsical opening was him playing to win - and in part the opening was concocted to irritate the serious Steinitz - but, also he was just screwing around.>

<Black's opening choice is a bit hard to understand>

<Entertaining,but not good...At first,white let black escape with his horrendeous setup>

This game was part of the 1862-63 match. For those who think the opening is a joke or unsound etc, it's worth remembering that Spassky used this setup twice in the 1966 World Championship and drew both games:

Petrosian vs Spassky, 1966

Petrosian vs Spassky, 1966

Dec-29-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Zenchess: 16. Nh5!! would have won immediately for White.
Jan-20-20  RandomVisitor: After 8...Ne7


click for larger view

Jan-20-20  syracrophy: In the position after 47.♔c6:


click for larger view

I liked the defensive resource suggested by Stockfish: 47...♖a7! 48.a4 ♔d8 49.♔xb6 ♖a8 <controlling the ♙'s from the front and relying on the fact that the ♗ must also control the enemy ♙'s advance> 50.♗e2 ♖b8+ 51.♔c5 ♖xb3.


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