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Michael Adams vs Garry Kasparov
Dortmund (1992), Dortmund GER, rd 8, Apr-25
Semi-Slav Defense: Stoltz Variation. Shabalov Attack (D45)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-06-04  Whitehat1963: What's the finish?
Apr-06-04  crafty: 23. ♘f3 ♗xf3 24. ♗xf3 ♘c5 25. ♖g4 ♘fe6 26. ♖xd8+   (eval -1.84; depth 14 ply; 500M nodes)
Apr-06-04  Whitehat1963: Where does Adams go wrong?
Apr-20-05  aw1988: Well, in Tarrasch's opinion, 7. g4...
Nov-27-05  alicefujimori: Actually, Adams went wrong by playing 8.e4. The simple 8.Bxc4 is enough to secure a decent advantage for white according to Peter Wells.
Feb-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: A massive crush by Garry!

I think this was the FIRST time these two ever clashed (OTB).

And ... joy of all joys ... it is a miniature as well.

Feb-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: The above was my 2001st post!!!!!
Feb-24-06  Fan of Leko: White has a bad position but it's much to early to just give up. These players treat Kasparov like he is some infallible chess god instead of human being who can make mistakes like anyone else.
Feb-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: This brings to mind a true story.

A few friends and I drove someplace (to Virginia?) for a chess tournament back in the 1970's.

I was playing a master - I was only a low "Class C" player at the time. I played a pretty strong attack, sacked a couple of pieces.

My opponent thought for about half an hour, then offered me his hand. "I don't want a draw," I responded. "No silly, I am resigning, its a forced mate in nine." I shook his hand, we signed each others scoresheets ... and went about our business.

The moral of the story? (The punchline?)

I have no clue what the mate was. (I was playing a little over my head.)

Feb-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: <Fan of Leko>
My last post was for you ... sorry that I did not label it.
Feb-24-06  Fan of Leko: That's really something, I don't even try to look nine moves ahead...Once when I was a C player I was 2 pawns down to an expert, so I sac a piece to go for perpetual. Repeat the position and with big smile offer a draw. My opponent says "of course" and I see that I had mate in 3 if I played a different check...was kicking myself for weeks for that one (would have been my first win against a player above 1800).
Feb-24-06  LIFE Master AJ: Thanks for your account, (I think I like yours better than mine).

My point was that I agreed with you. (It was way too early to give up!)

Feb-24-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: <My opponent thought for about half an hour, then offered me his hand. "I don't want a draw," I responded. "No silly, I am resigning, its a forced mate in nine." I shook his hand, we signed each others scoresheets ... and went about our business.>

I think the Tal story (which I don't believe) is much more believable than this latest yarn. A master resigning to a c- player (It's plausible). The master assuming the c-player saw a nine move forced mate. Highly doubtful. That, and the guy saying "no silly", had me disbelieving this BS story. Also, if a c- player beat a master, he would remember the name of the master, the place, (Virginia?) and the hour he pulled that upset off. The moral of AJ's post.(The punchline?) Don't believe every BS story that he tells.

Feb-26-06  hayton3: <"No silly, I am resigning, its a forced mate in nine.">

<I have no clue what the mate was. (I was playing a little over my head.)>

Thank God - the rest of players in hall were blissfully unaware of the implications of future minor master working out a forced mate in 9 and were thus spared the thunderous exclaims:- CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHECK, CHEEECKMAAATE.

Feb-27-06  abcpokerboy: Actually, I heard Shirov commenting on this opening, as I belive he was the first to play 7.g4. He beat Thorhallsen, then someone else (I can't remember who) and Adams saw the games and tried it against Kasparov. Kasparov thought about the move for some 20-25 minutes and replied 7...dxc4, the first such response to it, and Adams got wiped off the board in this mini-miniature. At least that's what Shirov related.
Mar-07-06  notyetagm: Wow, in and out of the d3-outpost. The Black c4-pawn provides an outpost deep in the White position on the d3-square for both of Black's knights. Impressive outpost play by Kasparov.

Just like Stean wrote in Simple Chess: <Pieces hate to defend pawns (weak pawns). Pawns love to defend pieces (outposts)>.

Mar-07-06  notyetagm: The position after 20 ... ♘cd3, shown below, offers a textbook example in the exploitation of <weak squares>.


click for larger view

2 c4 and 4 e3 weakened the d3-square, while 7 g4 and 8 e4 weakened the f4-square. Kasparov's knights occupied both of these <weak squares>, 18 ... ♘xf4 and 20 ... ♘cd3, with crushing effect.

Jan-03-08  nelech: i really don't understand why Adams resigned so prematurely
Jan-03-08  jamesmaskell: <nelech> Look at <crafty's> continuation. Thats why Adams resigned.
Jan-03-08  nelech: thanks but i am not conviced
Jan-03-08  newton296: <alicefujimori: Actually, Adams went wrong by playing 8.e4. The simple 8.Bxc4 is enough to secure a decent advantage for white according to Peter Wells.>

any good Q pawn player would play that. IMO this is a classic example of a lower rated player getting to creative for his own good , just because of who he is playing.

play the board not your opponent.

anyhow, kasparov seizes the chance to use the pawn to support his knights at the pretty d3 square. and white's toast.

Aug-13-09  ounos: <LIFE Master AJ:

I was playing a master - I was only a low "Class C" player at the time. I played a pretty strong attack, sacked a couple of pieces.

My opponent thought for about half an hour, then offered me his hand. "I don't want a draw," I responded. "No silly, I am resigning, its a forced mate in nine." I shook his hand, we signed each others scoresheets ... and went about our business. >

I also have trouble believing that one. For one, if I was in the situation the master is described in, I would respond something along "oh, you don't? alright..." and take my hand back, cuz you know it's fishy when your opponent doesn't realize you are resigning...

Sep-27-10  hedgeh0g: I'd have to agree that <LIFE Master AJ>'s story sounds a little fishy. Unless your opponent was wearing a tight leather outfit with a handlebar moustache, I doubt he'd be saying "No, silly".
Sep-27-10  mack: <Unless your opponent was wearing a tight leather outfit>

I can't help but feel that AJ is one of the last kibitzers here to be found playing skittles in Heaven.

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