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  1. Open Games
    Various games beginning with 1.e4 e5.
    1 game, 1982

  2. Opening traps
    75 games, 1848-2021

  3. Outrageous swindles
    15 games, 1843-2005

  4. Pawns Run Amok
    8 games, 1834-1984

  5. Puns I submitted
    Each of these games was made Game of the Day by chessgames.com using the pun I had submitted for it.
    183 games, 1769-2020

  6. Qg6!/...Qg3!
    These are games where the winning move is Qg6! by White or ...Qg3! by Black (not a capture in either case), placing the queen where it can be captured by at least one pawn, preferably two. Ideally, the move is a "quiet" one rather than a check.
    9 games, 1894-2011

  7. Quadrupled pawns
    7 games, 1907-2010

  8. Queen Traps
    Games in which a player's queen gets trapped.
    35 games, 1842-2019

  9. Reshevsky plays 11 world champions
    Reshevsky played every world champion from Lasker to Karpov, winning games against seven of them, and drawing at least one game against each of the other four.
    11 games, 1935-1991

  10. Semi-Tarrasch 8...Nc6!
    8 games, 1972-2009

  11. Spectacular draws
    9 games, 1863-2007

  12. Stalemate!
    48 games, 1846-2016

  13. Super-brevities
    These are decisive games of five or fewer moves.
    56 games, 1893-2017

  14. The Novotny theme
    These are games featuring the rare and beautiful Novotny theme, the sacrifice of a piece at the intersection of two lines (e.g. a rank or file, and a diagonal), with the result that one of the opponent's defensive lines is blocked, often resulting in an immediate win for the player playing the Novotny move. See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novot....
    6 games, 1910-2007

  15. Vidmar Memorial
    This tournament was contested in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia in June 1969, overlapping the end of the Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1969). It boasted ten International Grandmasters, three International Masters, and just three untitled players. FIDE classified it as Category 1A, then the highest category. Almost everyone expected that the battle for first place would be fought among experienced grandmasters like Svetozar Gligoric, Florin Gheorghiu, Wolfgang Unzicker, Aleksandar Matanovic, and Robert Byrne. [(1)]

    It thus came as a great surprise when the tournament was won by an untitled, little-known local player, Albin Planinc. Ludek Pachman wrote of Planinc's achievement in his 1975 book [[Pachman's Decisive Games]], "Can it happen that a player without a title at all can win a strong tournament and beat several grandmasters? In the last few decades there is only one case I know of."[(1)] Planinc's victory was well deserved. He took the lead in the first round, and throughout the tournament never stood lower than equal first. Mark Howard Horton remarked of the victor, "His style is rather similar to Tal, he having a preference for complicated tactical positions."[(2)] Later writers likened him to Don Quixote,[(3)] and observed, "An imaginative player, always seeking new ideas, he is capable of a win, or a loss, against almost anyone."[(4)]

    Planinc worked in the local bicycle factory. Pachman wrote that he "was probably the only competitor who was unable to take a day off to prepare for the tournament."[(1)] The 25-year-old amateur won in the first round against Janez Stupica, another untitled player, while all the other games were drawn. In the second round, Planinc kept the lead with a surprise victory over Matanovic. Planinc played the aggressive and risky Bishop's Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4), beating his grandmaster opponent with a king-side attack in 28 moves. Planinc drew in Rounds 3 and 4, enabling GM Georgi Tringov to catch up with him, but again took the outright lead in Round 5 with a win as Black against GM Gedeon Barcza.

    After drawing Tringov in Round 6, Planinc was finally brought back down to earth in Round 7 by Gligoric, who defeated his Modern Benoni in 52 moves. That brought about a four-way tie for first among Gligoric, Tringov, Planinc, and IM Stojan Puc at 4.5 points, with Unzicker, Gheorghiu, and Byrne just half a point behind.

    The loss only momentarily slowed Planinc, who won as Black against IM Gyozo Forintos in Round 8, drew Byrne in Round 9, and won a pretty game as Black against Unzicker in Round 10. After 10 rounds, Planinc and Puc (who was also having an excellent tournament) were tied for first with 7-3, a point ahead of Byrne, Gheorghiu, and Gligoric.

    In the next four rounds, Planinc drew thrice and beat IM Vojko Musil. Meanwhile, Puc lost two games, falling out of contention. Gligoric scored 3-1 in Rounds 11-14, drawing to within half a point of Planinc.

    This set up a dramatic last round showdown. Gligoric, as White against tailender Stupica, was heavily favored to win. Planinc was also White, but had a much more dangerous opponent in GM Gheorghiu.[(1)] Pachman writes: "Many players in Planinc's place would have been content with a tie and have used the advantage of the White pieces to obtain the necessary half point. As things turned out this would have been easy to achieve, for Gheorghiu offered him a draw twice during the game. The young player, however, had other ideas and first sacrificed a pawn in an unclear position and then made a perfectly correct rook sacrifice. The game, which turned out to be one of the most beautiful of the tournament, gave Planinc the final point, which caused a great sensation in the world of chess."[(5)]

    FIDE awarded Planinc the International Master title for this tournament.[(6)] He had indeed satisfied the standard for the award of the grandmaster title, but could not receive it because the rules did not then allow a player to become a grandmaster without first obtaining the IM title.[(7)] Planinc became a grandmaster in 1972.[(8)]

    Planinc's Cinderella-like feat - winning a strong international tournament as a little-known amateur, ahead of numerous grandmasters - has few parallels in chess history. Comparable achievements include the first-place finishes of Harry Nelson Pillsbury at Hastings (1895), Jose Raul Capablanca at San Sebastian (1911), Garry Kasparov at Banja Luka 1979 (Game Collection: Banja Luka 1979), and Glenn C Flear at London 1986. Of these, perhaps only Pillsbury's stunning triumph at Hastings, ahead of both the reigning and former world champions, was more surprising than Planinc's victory. Capablanca had routed Frank Marshall in a match two years before; Kasparov, though only 16, had finished with an even score in the previous year's Soviet Championship; and Flear already had the IM title. Even Pillsbury had prior international experience, having played at New York 1893 (Game Collection: New York 1893, The Impromtu Tournament). Planinc was the darkest of dark horses.

    table[
    June 2-20, 1969

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts. Prize 1 Planinc * 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 10.5 1 2 GM Gligoric 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 10.0 2 3 GM Unzicker 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 9.5 3 4 GM Tringov ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 9.0 4 5 GM Byrne ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 8.5 5-6 6 GM Matanovic 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 8.5 5-6 7 GM Gheorghiu 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 8.0 7-8 8 IM Puc ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 8.0 7-8 9 GM Barcza 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 7.0 10 GM Damjanovic ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 7.0 11 GM Parma ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 7.0 12 IM Musil 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 6.5 13 GM Robatsch ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 6.5 14 Bajec ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 0 ½ 5.5 15 IM Forintos 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 * 1 5.5 16 Stupica 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * 3.0 ]table

    table[
    Progressive Scores:

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 Planinc 1 2 2½ 3 4 4½ 4½ 5½ 6 7 7½ 8 9 9½ 10½ 2 Gligoric ½ 1 1½ 2½ 3 3½ 4½ 5 5½ 6 7 7½ 8½ 9 10 3 Unzicker ½ 1 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 5 5½ 6½ 7½ 8½ 9½ 4 Tringov ½ 1½ 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 5½ 5½ 6 7 7½ 8½ 9 =5 Byrne ½ 1½ 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 6 6½ 7 7½ 8 8½ =5 Matanovic ½ ½ 1 1½ 2 2½ 3½ 4 4½ 5 5½ 6½ 7 8 8½ =7 Gheorghiu ½ 1 2 2 2½ 3 4 5 5½ 6 6½ 7 7½ 8 8 =7 Puc ½ 1 1½ 2 ½2 4 4½ 5½ 6 7 7 7½ 8 8 8 =9 Barcza ½ 1½ 1½ 1½ 1½ 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 6 6 7 =9 Damjanovic ½ ½ 1 1½ 2 2½ 3 3 3 4 4½ 5 5½ 6 7 =9 Parma ½ 1 1 1½ 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 5½ 5½ 6 7 =12 Musil ½ 1 1½ 2 2½ 3 3 3½ 4½ 5 5½ 6 6 6½ 6½ =12 Robatsch ½ 1 1½ 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4½ 5 5½ 5½ 6 6½ 6½ =14 Bajec ½ 1 1½ 2 2 2½ 3 3½ 4 4 4½ 4½ 4½ 5 5½ =14 Forintos ½ ½ 1 1½ 2½ 3 3 3 4 4 4½ 4½ 5 5½ 5½ 16 Stupica 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1½ 1½ 1½ 2 2½ 3 3 3 3 ]table

    [ References: (1) Ludek Pachman, Pachman's Decisive Games, p. 233; (2) The Chess Player, Modern Chess Opening Theory as Surveyed in Ljubliana 1969 Complete with All the Games, p. 3 (this pamphlet is also the source of the dates of the rounds); (3) Dr. Petar Trifunović, Svetozar Gligorić, Rudolf Marić, and Dragoljub Janošević, Yugoslav Chess Triumphs, p. 43; (4) David Hooper and Kenneth Whyld, The Oxford Companion to Chess (2d ed. 1992), pp. 310-11; (5) Pachman's Decisive Games, pp. 233-34; (6) http://www.schack.se/tfsarkiv/histo..., p. 177; (7) Pachman's Decisive Games, p. 234; (8) The Oxford Companion to Chess, p. 310. ]

    120 games, 1969

  16. Weird checkmates
    7 games, 1862-2011

  17. World Junior Championship, Toronto 1957
    The World Junior Championship is open to players younger than 20 on January 1 of the year in which the tournament is played. The first World Junior was held in 1951, and it was held biennially thereafter. The 1957 event, played in Toronto, Canada, was the fourth. Since 1973 the tournament has been held annually. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World.... Four World Junior Champions (Boris Spassky, Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, and Viswanathan Anand) have gone on to become World Champions.

    The 1957 tournament included 12 players from 11 countries (Canada, Egypt, Finland, Mexico, the Netherlands, the Philippines, South Africa, Sweden, USA, USSR, and West Germany). Canada, as the host country, was allowed two representatives. The players from the Soviet Union, the Philippines, and Mexico were accompanied by seconds: Grandmaster Igor Bondarevsky, future FIDE President Florencio Campomanes, and Dr. R. Sernas, respectively.

    The participants were a varied lot. The tournament book reflects that William Lombardy of the United States was studying biochemistry at CCNY and would enter medicine in two years. (In fact, he entered the priesthood.) He had already had considerable success as a player, including winning the 1954 New York State Championship, tying for first at the 1956 Canadian Open, and narrowly losing a 1956 match to Samuel Reshevsky. Mathias Gerusel of West Germany was studying mathematics. Dutchman Alexander Jongsma was a first-class table tennis player, who also played lawn tennis, swam, played the piano, and participated in ballroom dancing. The Soviet, Vladimir Selimanov, was the stepson of reigning World Champion Vasily Smyslov and planned to study literature and philosophy in college. Rodolfo Tan Cardoso had played for the Philippines in the 1956 Chess Olympiad, winning the silver medal on fourth board. The month after this tournament, he played the Fischer - Cardoso (1957) match against American wunderkind Robert James Fischer. Ralph Hallerod of Sweden was in his last year of high school and planned to study engineering at university. Canadian Francois Jobin had completed his first year of university and planned to become a physician. The Mexican representative, Jorge Aldrete Lobo, had just learned the game in 1953, but had won the Mexican Junior Championship in 1955 and 1957. He was an avid sportsman and planned to study chemical engineering. Timo O Makelainen of Finland planned to enter the University of Helsinki next year. Bernard Rabinowitz of South Africa had competed in the 1955 Johannesburg International Tournament, drawing his game against former World Champion Max Euwe. An actuary student, on the sea voyage to Canada "he put his actuarial knowledge to good account each evening by a careful and remunerative calculation of the odds on the 'horse races'!" Ibrahim M Bahgat of Egypt, a pharmacy student at the University of Texas, was an avid stamp collector and weightlifter. Having bench-pressed 250 pounds, "Undoubtedly he was the strongest player in the tournament." The second Canadian, Peter Bates, intended to study mathematics in college.

    Shortly before the tournament began, the tournament organizer, Bernard Freedman, received word that Selimanov would arrive a day late because of a delay in getting his Canadian visa. Freedman decided to permit him to play; the tournament book reflects that this decision "was favourably received by practically every contestant." Selimanov's game against Lombardy, scheduled for Round 1, was played on the rest day between rounds 4 and 5. Lombardy won, giving him a 4-0 score and a one-point lead over Gerusel, whom he had routed in 18 moves in Round 3. M Gerusel vs Lombardy, 1957.

    No one could stop Lombardy, who won game after game. After six rounds, his lead had increased to two points over Gerusel and at least 2½ over everyone else. Gerusel won his remaining five games, but that was not enough, as Lombardy did the same. That gave Lombardy a perfect 11-0 score and the title of World Junior Champion. Gerusel was second at 9-2, and Jongsma took the bronze with 8½ points. Cardoso won the brilliancy prize for his game R Cardoso vs M Gerusel, 1957.

    Perfect scores are very rarely seen in any significant chess tournament or match. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_.... Lombardy's perfect score has never been matched in any World Junior Championship before or since, as everyone else has ceded at least two draws. The closest approaches have been by Karpov in 1969 (10/11 in the finals, 90.9%); Spassky in 1955 (8/9 in the finals, 88.9%); and Kiril Georgiev in 1983 (11.5/13, 88.5%).

    table[
    August 3-17, 1957

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 1 William James Lombardy * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11.0 2 Mathias Gerusel 0 * 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9.0 3 Alexander Jongsma 0 0 * ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8.5 4 Vladimir Selimanov 0 0 ½ * 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 8.0 5 Rodolfo Tan Cardoso 0 1 0 0 * 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 6.5 6 Ralph Hallerod 0 0 0 ½ 1 * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 5.0 7 Francois Jobin 0 0 0 0 0 ½ * 0 1 1 1 1 4.5 8 Jorge Aldrete Lobo 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 0 1 1 1 4.0 9 Timo O Makelainen 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 * ½ ½ 1 3.5 10 Bernard Rabinowitz 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 2.5 11 Ibrahim M Bahgat 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * ½ 2.0 12 Peter Bates 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ * 1.5 ]table

    table[
    Progressive Scores:

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 Lombardy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 Gerusel 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 Jongsma 1 2 2½ 2½ 2½ 3½ 4½ 5½ 6½ 7½ 8½ 4 Selimanov 0 0 ½ 1½ 2½ 3½ 4 5 6 7 8 5 Cardoso 1 1½ 2½ 2½ 3½ 3½ 3½ 4½ 5½ 5½ 6½ 6 Hallerod ½ ½ 1 2 2½ 3 3½ 3½ 3½ 4½ 5 7 Jobin 1 2 2½ 2½ 2½ 3½ 4½ 4½ 4½ 4½ 4½ 8 Aldrete Lobo 0 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 9 Makelainen 0 0 0 1 1½ 2 2 3 3½ 3½ 3½ 10 Rabinowitz 0 ½ 1 1½ 2 2 2 2 2½ 2½ 2½ 11 Bahgat ½ ½ ½ 1 1½ 1½ 1½ 1½ 1½ 2 2 12 Bates 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1½ ]table

    table[
    Prizes:

    First Prize: William Lombardy $200 and trophy Second Prize: Mathias Gerusel $100
    Third Prize: Alexander Jongsma $50
    Fourth Prize: Vladimir Selimanov $40
    Fifth Prize: Rodolfo Tan Cardoso $30
    Sixth Prize: Ralph Hallerod $15
    Seventh Prize: Francois Jobin $10
    ]table

    Source: Frank Ross Anderson and Keith Kerns, Fourth Biennial World Junior Chess Championship: August 3-17, 1957, Toronto, Canada

    66 games, 1957

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