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P-Q4 Krause called Fredthebear's house
Compiled by fredthebear
--*--

* VK plays P-Q4: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

Nov-02-12 Infohunter: Larger databases, because less picky about game quality, can be found at these sites: http://www.chesslive.de./ http://mychess.com/
http://www.chess.com/
http://www.365chess.com/

And I am sure there must be a host of others.

* Internet tracking: https://www.studysmarter.us/magazin...

Bughouse Rules

Bughouse is an outrageously fun team game in which one partner plays White and the other plays Black. As a player captures an opponent's piece, that captured piece is passed to the partner. The partner can either make a regular chess move, or place any one of the pieces passed by the partner anywhere on the board! (well, almost anywhere - there are certain rules to follow that we go over in class). To add to the excitement, Bughouse is played with clocks at a quick pace (5 minutes) and players are allowed to TALK!! In fact, you have to talk in order to effectively communicate strategies with your partner. Of course, your opponents might overhear you and plan their counter strategy. So you could whisper, or even talk in secret codes! But you can't hide captured pieces - they have to stay out in the open where everyone can see them. Not fair pulling a rook out from under your beard! These rules and others are contained in he official USCF Bughouse Rules 5th Edition, which will be posted on the walls for Bughouse events. It was interesting to note, during Grandmaster Nigel Davies' recent instructional clinics, that he greatly encouraged Bughouse as a tool for developing the imagination.

IMPORTANT! Because of the high level of noise, Bughouse will be played only on pre-advertised Bughouse tournament days (normally around Halloween, plus or minus a week, and sometimes at other times during the year).

BUGHOUSE RULES (adapted from http://raleighchessacademy.com/wp-c... )

1. Number of Players - There are exactly two players on a team; they are called 'team members,' 'partners' or 'pardners' (Texas only). No substitutions of players are allowed at any time during the tournament. Ya dances with the pardner what brought ya. A Tournament can have many competing teams.

2. Bughouse Game - A 'Bughouse Game' matches one team member against one opponent, and the other team member against that opponent's partner. Play is conducted by the four players on two regulation chess boards, each starting from the normal chess starting position, with white moving first and each using a chess clock (digital takes precedence over analog). One partner plays White; the other Black. The first checkmate or time forfeit on either board ends the Game. If either partner on a team wins their board, then their team wins the Game. Just as in regular chess, there are multiple Games (rounds) per tournament.

3. Colors - For each Game, the team decides which partner is to play white and which is to play black. Once a Game is started, partners may not switch boards (and although you can always give advice to your partner, you cannot touch your partner's pieces).

4. Time control - The time control is Game in 5 minutes. Use 2 second delay when possible.

5. Bring a clock- Each team is responsible for providing a clock. If a team does not have a clock and their opponents do have a clock, the team without a clock forfeits. If neither team has a clock then both teams forfeit.

6. Completion of Move - If a player's hand has released a piece then that move cannot be changed, unless it is an illegal move. A move is not Completed until the piece is released AND the clock is pressed. If the clock has not been pressed then the opponent may not move (this is under review)

8. Illegal moves lose, if they are caught before the next move is made. I. If an opponent makes a move and starts the opponent's clock, they have forfeited the right to claim that illegal move. II. Before play begins both players should inspect the position of the pieces and the setting of the clock, since once each side has made a move all claims for correcting either are null and void. The only exception is if one or both players have more than five minutes on their clock, then the tournament director may reduce the time accordingly. III. Illegal moves, unnoticed by both players, cannot be corrected afterwards, nor can they become the basis for later making an illegal move claim. If the King and Queen are set up incorrectly when the game begins, then you may castle short on the queen side and castle long on the kingside. Once each side has made a move, incorrect setups must stay.

9. Passing pieces - When a piece is captured, the captured piece is passed to the partner only after the move is completed (opponent's clock is started).

10. Placing or moving pieces- A player has the option of either moving one of their pieces on their board or placing a piece their teammate has captured and passed to them. I. A captured piece may be placed on any unoccupied square on the board, with the exception that a pawn may not be placed on the first or last rank. II. Pieces may be placed to create or interpose check or checkmate. (under review - some variants do not allow "drop mates") III. A promoted pawn, which has been captured, reverts to a pawn and not the promoted piece.

11. Displaying captured pieces- A player may not attempt to hide pieces captured by their partner from the opponent. The first attempt will be a warning and the second attempt will result in forfeiture of the game.

12. Communicating allowed- Partners may verbally communicate throughout a game. It is legal for one partner to make move suggestions to the other partner. It is illegal and grounds for forfeiting the match if one partner physically moves one of their partner's pieces.

13. Clock Hand- Each player must push the clock button with the same hand they use to move their pieces. Exception: only during castling may a player use both hands. When capturing only one hand may be used. The first infraction will get a warning, the second a one minute penalty and the third will result in the loss of the game.

14. Touching a Clock- Except for pushing the clock button neither player should touch the clock except: I. To straighten it; II. If either player knocks over the clock his opponent gets one minute added to their clock; III. If your opponent's clock does not begin you may push their side down and repunch your side; however, if this procedure is unsatisfactory, please call for a director; IV. Each player must always be allowed to push the clock after their move is made. Neither player should keep their hand on or hover over the clock.

15. Define a win- A game is won by the player: I. who has mated their opponent's king; II. If the checking piece is not a knight or is not in contact (on an adjacent square) with the defending king and the defending player does not have any material to block the check, the defending player may wait until his or her partner supplies a piece provided their time does not run out. III. whose opponent resigns; IV. whose opponent's flag falls first, at any time before the game is otherwise ended, provided he/she points it out and neutralizes the clock while their own flag is still up; V. who, after an illegal move, takes the opponent's king or stops the clock; VI. an illegal move doesn't negate a player's right to claim on time, provided he/she does so prior to their opponent's claim of an illegal move. If the claims are simultaneous, the player who made the illegal move loses.

16. Defining a draw- A game is a draw: I. By agreement between the teams during the game only. II. If the flag of one player falls after the flag of the other player has already fallen and a win has not been claimed, unless either side mates before noticing both flags down. Announced checkmate nullifies any later time claims.

17. Replacing pieces- If a player accidentally displaces one or more pieces, he shall replace them on his own time. If it is necessary, his opponent may start the opponent's clock without making a move in order to make sure that the culprit uses his own time while replacing the pieces. Finally, it is unsportsmanlike to knock over any pieces then punch the clock. For the first offense the player will get a warning (unless this causes his flag to fall, in which case the opponent will get one extra minute added to his clock). For a second offense a one minute add-on for the opponent will be imposed. For a third offense the offender shall forfeit the game. Thereafter, the tournament director may use other penalties or expel a player from the event for repeated offenses.

18. Dispute between players - In case of a dispute either player may stop both clocks while the tournament director is being summoned. In any unclear situation the tournament director will consider the testimony of both players and any reliable witnesses before rendering his decision. If a player wishes to appeal the decision of a tournament director, the player must first appeal to the section chief then, if necessary, the player may appeal to the Chief floor director, whose decision in all cases is final.

19. TD touching the clock - The tournament director shall not pick up the clock; except in the case of a dispute.

20. Observer conduct - Spectators and players of another match are not to speak or otherwise interfere in a game. If a spectator interferes in any way, such as by calling attention to the flag fall or an illegal move, the tournament director may cancel the game and rule that a new game be played in its stead, and he may also expel the offending party from the playing room. The tournament director should also be silent about illegal moves, flag falls, etc. (unless there is an agreement with the players, before the game, to call them) as this is entirely the responsibility of the players.

21. Replacing a promoted pawn - If a player promotes a pawn they must leave the pawn on the board and clearly indicate to their opponent to what piece the pawn is being promoted too. The promoted pawn will be laid on it's side to indicate that it is a promoted pawn (MCS&C local rule - to prevent later disagreements about what piece the pawn was promoted to, and to avoid pawns annoyingly rolling about and off the board, a spare piece quickly found from another set should be used and placed in the normal upright position, an upside down rook still signifying a queen. The argument against this is nuclear proliferation of Queens, but I don't think it is a strong argument).

22. Replacement clock - Only a tournament director may determine if a clock is defective and change clocks.

23. Player behavior - Excessive banging of pieces or clock will not be tolerated and the offending player may be penalized with loss of time (Director discretion)

24. Insufficient Losing Chances- Insufficient losing chances claims cannot be made in Bughouse games.

25. Rules Not Covered Above - The Official Rules of Chess, 5th edition, shall be used to resolve any situation not covered by these rules.

* Top Chessgames by ECO Code: http://schachsinn.de/gamelist.htm

* Freaky Fridays: https://allchessopenings.blogspot.c...

The Will Explained By Aesop

If what old story says of Aesop's true,
The oracle of Greece he was,
And more than Areopagus he knew,
With all its wisdom in the laws.
The following tale gives but a sample
Of what has made his fame so ample.
Three daughters shared a father's purse,
Of habits totally diverse.
The first, bewitched with drinks delicious;
The next, coquettish and capricious;
The third, supremely avaricious.
The sire, expectant of his fate,
Bequeathed his whole estate,
In equal shares, to them,
And to their mother just the same, –
To her then payable, and not before,
Each daughter should possess her part no more.
The father died. The females three
Were much in haste the will to see.
They read, and read, but still
Saw not the willer's will.
For could it well be understood
That each of this sweet sisterhood,
When she possessed her part no more,
Should to her mother pay it over?
It was surely not so easy saying
How lack of means would help the paying.
What meant their honoured father, then?
The affair was brought to legal men,
Who, after turning over the case
Some hundred thousand different ways,
Threw down the learned bonnet,
Unable to decide on it;
And then advised the heirs,
Without more thought, t" adjust affairs.
As to the widow's share, the counsel say,
"We hold it just the daughters each should pay
One third to her on demand,
Should she not choose to have it stand
Commuted as a life annuity,
Paid from her husband's death, with due congruity." The thing thus ordered, the estate
Is duly cut in portions three.
And in the first they all agree
To put the feasting-lodges, plate,
Luxurious cooling mugs,
Enormous liquor jugs,
Rich cupboards, – built beneath the trellised vine, – The stores of ancient, sweet Malvoisian wine,
The slaves to serve it at a sign;
In short, whatever, in a great house,
There is of feasting apparatus.
The second part is made
Of what might help the jilting trade –
The city house and furniture,
Exquisite and genteel, be sure,
The eunuchs, milliners, and laces,
The jewels, shawls, and costly dresses.
The third is made of household stuff,
More vulgar, rude, and rough –
Farms, fences, flocks, and fodder,
And men and beasts to turn the sod over.
This done, since it was thought
To give the parts by lot
Might suit, or it might not,
Each paid her share of fees dear,
And took the part that pleased her.
It was in great Athens town,
Such judgment gave the gown.
And there the public voice
Applauded both the judgment and the choice.
But Aesop well was satisfied
The learned men had set aside,
In judging thus the testament,
The very gist of its intent.
"The dead," Said he, "could he but know of it,
Would heap reproaches on such Attic wit.
What! men who proudly take their place
As sages of the human race,
Lack they the simple skill
To settle such a will?"
This said, he undertook himself
The task of portioning the pelf;
And straightway gave each maid the part
The least according to her heart –
The prim coquette, the drinking stuff,
The drinker, then, the farms and cattle;
And on the miser, rude and rough,
The robes and lace did Aesop settle;
For thus, he said, "an early date
Would see the sisters alienate
Their several shares of the estate.
No motive now in maidenhood to tarry,
They all would seek, post haste, to marry;
And, having each a splendid bait,
Each soon would find a well-bred mate;
And, leaving thus their father's goods intact,
Would to their mother pay them all, in fact," – Which of the testament
Was plainly the intent.
The people, who had thought a slave an ass,
Much wondered how it came to pass
That one alone should have more sense
Than all their men of most pretence.

<Jan-25-19 stole cheese for guy:

Only I's unsolved in sordid golden "conniptions" here at <MG>, so task my admission with grease of lightening.>

Riddle: If you drop a yellow hat in the Red Sea, what does it become?

Answer: Wet, duh!

Annabel Lee
by Edgar Allan Poe

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love— I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,
Went envying her and me—
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love Of those who were older than we—
Of many far wiser than we—
And neither the angels in Heaven above
Nor the demons down under the sea
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride, In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

"....his countrymen, Kolisch and Steinitz, are greatly indebted for their later success to their having enjoyed early opportunities of practicing with the departed amateur whose death is also greatly deplored amongst all who knew him personally." — Wilhelm Steinitz, regarding Karl Hamppe

The first appearance of the (John) Cochrane gambit against Petrov's defense C42 was in the year 1848 against an Indian master Mohishunder Bannerjee.

"Sorry don't get it done, Dude!" — John Wayne, Rio Bravo

"Gossip is the devil's telephone. Best to just hang up." — Moira Rose

"God's mercy and grace give me hope - for myself, and for our world." — Billy Graham

"Man has two great spiritual needs. One is for forgiveness. The other is for goodness." — Billy Graham

Queen Pawn Game: Symmetrical 5.Be3?! a5 (D02) 1/2-1/2
N Sarin vs N Kacharava, 2021 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 64 moves, 1/2-1/2

Game 296 in Three Hundred Chess Games by Siegbert Tarrasch
Blackburne vs Tarrasch, 1894  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 36 moves, 1-0

13 year-old Capa teaches the endgame from Colle Zukertort
Capablanca vs J Corzo, 1901 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 60 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 London System vs Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Rs ending
Von Scheve vs Blackburne, 1901 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 49 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Variation (D02) 1-0 Stockfish, KEG annotates!
Pillsbury vs Marshall, 1901 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 33 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Variation (D02) 1-0 KEG annotates!
E Delmar vs C S Howell, 1901 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 38 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Variation (D02) 0-1
Von Scheve vs Pillsbury, 1902 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 23 moves, 0-1

G17 in Chess Highlights of the 20th Century by Graham Burgess
Janowski vs Tarrasch, 1905 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 37 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Variation (D02) 0-1 Lively
Swiderski vs Spielmann, 1906 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 23 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Variation (D02) 0-1 Exposed King
Swiderski vs Marshall, 1906 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Notes by Stockfish
Maroczy vs Marshall, 1906 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 1-0

Q Pawn Game: Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Another FJM gem
Burn vs Marshall, 1906 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 40 moves, 0-1

Game 35 in Elements of Combination Play in Chess by F. Reinfeld
Janowski vs J N Berger, 1907 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 33 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var Copycat Def (D02) 1-0 Brutal Dbl B sacs
Schlechter vs Maroczy, 1907 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 28 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Rooks and Pawns ending
Swiderski vs J Mieses, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 52 moves, 1-0

The Reverse (Black) Queen's Gambit Accepted
Marshall vs Duras, 1908 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 35 moves, 0-1

Krause Def, Black loads 7th rank (D02) 1-0 WN beats BN to punch
Swiderski vs J N Berger, 1908 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 1-0

G5 inThe Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Chernev
Rubinstein vs Duras, 1908  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 EG lesson, trapped N
Rubinstein vs J Goldfarb, 1908 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 41 moves, 1-0

Middlegame Combinations by Peter Romanovsky
Janowski vs J Mieses, 1908 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 45 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1
Von Bardeleben vs J Mieses, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 32 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Which pin is poison?
Swiderski vs Spielmann, 1908 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2 Vienna
Rubinstein vs H Suechting, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Black must give material to stop mate
Teichmann vs Spielmann, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 17 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Notes by Lasker
E Cohn vs Duras, 1909  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 34 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2 Notes by Lasker
A Speijer vs Spielmann, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2 Notes by Lasker
Schlechter vs J Perlis, 1909  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

Krause 2.c5 vs Colle c3 (D02) 0-1 The proper capture matters
C Jaffe vs Marshall, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 53 moves, 0-1

Game 21 Veliki majstori saha 11 RUBINSTEIN (Petrovic)
Rubinstein vs J Mieses, 1909  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 44 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Notes by Leopold Hoffer
Rubinstein vs J Mieses, 1909  
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 28 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 notes by Stockfish
Rubinstein vs J Mieses, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 41 moves, 1-0

On move 27, Tarrasch makes the first rook move of the game.
Tarrasch vs E Dyckhoff, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 1-0

Reverse QGA: Krause Variation; Anastasia's Mate in one
Alekhine vs P S Leonhardt, 1910 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 1-0

Game 21 in Learn from the Legends by Mihail Marin. 3rd edition.
W John vs Alekhine, 1910 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 62 moves, 0-1

Krause Def. vs London System (D02) 0-1 Exchanges Ne5
Schlechter vs Rotlewi, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 40 moves, 0-1

Game 35 in Chess Highlights of the 20th Century by Burgess
Capablanca vs Spielmann, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 1-0

Zukertort-Stonewall expands on Qside (D02) 1-0
Capablanca vs A Anaya, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 1-0

July, p. 157 [Game 182 / 2218] American Chess Bulletin 1911
Vidmar vs Rubinstein, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 22 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Q trap
Nimzowitsch vs Alekhine, 1912 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 36 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1-0
Marshall vs P S Leonhardt, 1912 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 32 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1/2-1/2
E Cohn vs Breyer, 1912
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 24 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Kf8 is like being a rook down
Rubinstein vs S Levitsky, 1912 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 22 moves, 1-0

QGD: Tarrasch Def. Pseudo-Tarrasch (D30) 0-1 Stockfish notes
Janowski vs Lasker, 1914 
(D30) Queen's Gambit Declined, 52 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Threats on both sides
Alekhine vs A Kaufmann, 1918 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 8 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Stockfish notes
Alekhine vs A Kaufmann, 1919 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 38 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Brilliant! Notes by Stockfish
Alekhine vs H Wolf, 1922 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 40 moves, 1-0

Colle 3.c3 vs Krause Var (D02) 1-0central exchanges, dueling Bs
Maroczy vs Olland, 1922 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 61 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Gain time on Black Q
Rubinstein vs W Von Holzhausen, 1926 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 1-0

Game 58 Capablanca's Best Games by Harry Golombek
Capablanca vs Rubinstein, 1928 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 44 moves, 1-0

Krause 2...c5 Var. vs Stonewall Attk (D02) 1-0 Activity edge
Sultan Khan vs Rubinstein, 1931 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 57 moves, 1-0

(43) Battles Royal of the Chessboard by R.N. Coles
Sultan Khan vs Alekhine, 1933 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 108 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Overworked, but...
Flohr vs Grob, 1933 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Flohr vs H W Felderhof, 1933 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 78 moves, 1/2-1/2

Colle 5.c3 vs Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Black weakens his kingside
Ragozin vs Stahlberg, 1935 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 26 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Three possible mate patterns
Koblents vs Graf-Stevenson, 1935 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 33 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 g-pawn is immune due to R+ skewer
V Makogonov vs V Rauzer, 1937 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 1-0

G180 in The Fireside Book of Chess by Chernev & Reinfeld
Rellstab vs Petrov, 1937 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 26 moves, 0-1

Krause Copycat (D02) 0-1 Premature Greek Gift loses time
Najdorf vs Tartakower, 1938 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 44 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Rob the pin not Fredthebear
T Bergs vs J Fride, 1940 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 19 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Notes by Stockfish
F Lupi vs Alekhine, 1945 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Blunder ruins White
J Lynch vs P Michel, 1945 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Black ruins Kside, bad bishop
Kamsky vs Dlugy, 1989 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 38 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1/2-1/2
P Nikolic vs Seirawan, 1989
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 45 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Andersson vs O Peyrat, 1991
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 35 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Blitz
D Gurevich vs Dlugy, 1993
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 1-0
P Nikolic vs Leko, 1994
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 55 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1
T Thorhallsson vs O Dimakiling, 2006
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 47 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) · 0-1 rapid
Y Wang vs Mamedyarov, 2016
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 45 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Sally's secret of the Swiss Gambit
B Steinthorsson vs S Danielsson, 2018 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 35 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1-0 Internet
Y Wang vs Dreev, 2018
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 57 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 48
Janowski vs Von Scheve, 1902
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 48 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 48
Janowski vs Marshall, 1902
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 63 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 31
Janowski vs H Wolf, 1902 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 33
Janowski vs Marshall, 1905 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 33 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 46
Janowski vs Marshall, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 46 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 53
Janowski vs H Suechting, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 53 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 42
Janowski vs J Esser, 1910
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 42 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 31
Janowski vs P S Leonhardt, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1-0

D02 1-0 42
Janowski vs I S Turover, 1921
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 42 moves, 1-0

D02 1/2-1/2 34
Janowski vs J Bernstein, 1916
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 34 moves, 1/2-1/2

Schlechter vs Alapin, 1905
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 61 moves, 1-0

Schlechter vs Burn, 1907 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1-0

Schlechter vs Tarrasch, 1907 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 23 moves, 1/2-1/2

Schlechter vs Maroczy, 1907
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 1/2-1/2

Schlechter vs Spielmann, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1/2-1/2

Schlechter vs Tarrasch, 1911 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 106 moves, 1-0

Schlechter vs Tarrasch, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

Schlechter vs Tarrasch, 1911 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var Qxb2?1 (D02) 1-0 K flush
Schlechter vs P S Leonhardt, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 21 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2 Karlsbad 1911
Schlechter vs Spielmann, 1911 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 70 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2
Schlechter vs G Marco, 1915
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 1/2-1/2

D02 0-1 31
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs Duras, 1907 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 0-1

D02 1-0 49
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs Spielmann, 1907
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 49 moves, 1-0

D02 1/2-1/2 37
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs L Forgacs, 1909
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 37 moves, 1/2-1/2

D02 0-1 38
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs S von Freymann, 1909
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 38 moves, 0-1

D02 0-1 69
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs J Perlis, 1909 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 69 moves, 0-1

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1-0
Teichmann vs H Suechting, 1907
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 51 moves, 1-0

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1-0
Teichmann vs W Cohn, 1907
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 37 moves, 1-0

December, p. 240 [Game 260 /1280] American Chess Bulletin 1907
Teichmann vs W Cohn, 1907
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 1-0

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Teichmann vs J Perlis, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1/2-1/2

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Var (D02) 1/2-1/2 Vienna
Teichmann vs Maroczy, 1908
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 18 moves, 1/2-1/2

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Teichmann vs K Sterk, 1912
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 a sort of Anderssen's Mate w/extra Ps
R Gerber vs R Ekstroem, 2004 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 0-1

P-Q4: Krause Var (D02) 1-0 20.?
M Tauber vs P Bachmayr, 1991 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 24 moves, 1-0

London System vs Horwitz Def (A40) 1-0 Q trap w/Poisoned Pawn
P Donrault vs C Michaud, 1994 
(A40) Queen's Pawn Game, 10 moves, 1-0

Trompowsky Attack: Poisoned Pawn Var (A45) 1-0 madness
T Gareyev vs Sevian, 2015 
(A45) Queen's Pawn Game, 29 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 0-1 11...Nd6 Q trap
D Ponziani vs D Ercole Del Rio, 1770 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 10 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 0-1 Black owns the center
E von Feyerfeil vs Lasker, 1889 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 47 moves, 0-1

1.d4 d5 2.Bf4 c5: Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 1-0 Discovery
J Mason vs Chigorin, 1889 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 13 moves, 1-0

Q Pawn 2.Bf4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 0-1Trespasser rebuke
K Regan vs R P Michell, 1905 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 11 moves, 0-1

Q Pawn Game: Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 1/2-1/2 Vienna
Von Bardeleben vs Tartakower, 1908 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 1/2-1/2

P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) · 1-0
Spielmann vs S Landau, 1936 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 26 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit 0-0-0 vs 0-0 (D00) 1-0
Graf-Stevenson vs Menchik, 1937 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 24 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Chandler Gambit (D02) 1-0 Not my favorite gambit
Csom vs Chandler, 1983 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 1-0

2.P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 1-0 I'll be dogged ?!?
F Vass vs P Hogarty, 2006 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 16 moves, 1-0

Q Pawn Game: Morris Countergambit (D00) 0-1 messy scrap!
J Rowson vs M Stojanovic, 2006 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 0-1

QP 1.d4 d5 2.Bf4 c5 Steinitz Countergambit Poisoned P(D00) 1-0
B Boyle vs P Cafolla, 2008
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 31 moves, 1-0

P-Q4 Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 0-1 Open d- and b-files
E Danielian vs Qi Guo, 2012
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 50 moves, 0-1

Q Pawn Game: Morris Countergambit (D00) 0-1 Conversion to EG
Kharlov vs B Ofitserian, 2014 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 40 moves, 0-1

London System vs Steinitz CG (D02) 0-1 Delayed 0-0-0
Carlsen vs A Korobov, 2016 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 23 moves, 0-1

Q Pawn Game: Steinitz Countergambit (D00) 1-0 Fredthebear share
Indjic vs Gupta Prithu, 2019
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 55 moves, 1-0

Relocate
Indjic vs K Mona, 2017
(A45) Queen's Pawn Game, 35 moves, 1-0

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) 0-1 Correspondence
H Malmgren vs Keres, 1935 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 38 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Isolani blockaded Fredthebear
M Beltz vs H M Klek, 2013 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 Discovered+ is threatened
R Ravisekhar vs N Neelakantan, 1992 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 18 moves, 0-1

P-Q4 Krause Var (D02) 0-1 youth game; Notes by Stockfish
Carlsen vs L M Hansen, 1999 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 27 moves, 0-1

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) 1/2-1/2 New York, NY
Granda Zuniga vs Dlugy, 1988
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 16 moves, 1/2-1/2

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Flohr vs E Lundin, 1946 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 55 moves, 1/2-1/2

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Variation (D02) · 1/2-1/2
Seirawan vs V Zaltsman, 1986 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 46 moves, 1/2-1/2

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Var (D02) 0-1 KEG annotates
Von Scheve vs Tarrasch, 1902 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 79 moves, 0-1

P-Q4: Krause Variation (D02) 0-1 Duel of invading Queens
Von Scheve vs Teichmann, 1902 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 0-1

Queen Pawn Game: Krause Var (D02) 1-0 wrong interposition
A Stefanova vs M Vasiltseva, 1992 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 23 moves, 1-0

They went to Mickey D's afterward! (See final position.)
F Duz-Khotimirsky vs Maroczy, 1908 
(D02) Queen's Pawn Game, 30 moves, 1/2-1/2

delete
A Afonasieva vs L Dryaeva, 2022 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 16 moves, 1-0

134 games

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